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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

1-20 of 311 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The top 25 secret agents in film

27 August 2015 6:43 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ahead of American Ultra's arrival in UK cinemas, here's our pick of the 25 finest, sneakiest secret agents in film...

Operatives. Spies. Moles. Infiltrators. Secret agents go by many names. In fact, Britain's national security agency doesn't even call them agents - they're covert human intelligence sources, or simply “officers".

Whatever we choose to call them, secret agents lead necessarily furtive and obscure lives - so obscure that most of what we know about them is defined by what we've seen and read in books and movies.

During the Cold War, the image of the secret agent as a well-groomed sophisticate in a suit proliferated all over the world, and even in the high-tech landscape of the 21st century, that image still stands - just look at such movies as Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and, of course, the Bond franchise. But secret agents can come in many other guises, »

- simonbrew

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TV Is Not the New Film, But It’s Ok That Festivals Are Blurring the Lines

26 August 2015 6:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Peter Debruge: Looks like Toronto is the latest film festival to add a television section to its lineup. These days, everywhere from Sundance to SXSW to the Canadian “festival of festivals,” smallscreen content is getting a big push, which is intriguing — and even ironic — for all sorts of reasons (ironic because the state of distribution being what it is, many of the films in Toronto will end up trickling down to VOD, rather than ever getting a commercial theatrical run). On one hand, the trend isn’t exactly new: Classy longform features like “Carlos” (which premiered at Cannes in 2010), “Top of the Lake” (Sundance 2013) and “Olive Kitteridge” (Venice 2014) made their bows at top-tier film fests before going on to air as miniseries on Canal Plus, BBC Two and HBO, respectively.

But Toronto’s Primetime program — like SXSW’s Episodics, which launched last year — represents something different: Rather than expanding the »

- Justin Chang and Peter Debruge

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TV Is Not the New Film, But It’s Ok That Festivals Are Blurring the Lines

26 August 2015 6:56 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Peter Debruge: Looks like Toronto is the latest film festival to add a television section to its lineup. These days, everywhere from Sundance to SXSW to the Canadian “festival of festivals,” smallscreen content is getting a big push, which is intriguing — and even ironic — for all sorts of reasons (ironic because the state of distribution being what it is, many of the films in Toronto will end up trickling down to VOD, rather than ever getting a commercial theatrical run). On one hand, the trend isn’t exactly new: Classy longform features like “Carlos” (which premiered at Cannes in 2010), “Top of the Lake” (Sundance 2013) and “Olive Kitteridge” (Venice 2014) made their bows at top-tier film fests before going on to air as miniseries on Canal Plus, BBC Two and HBO, respectively.

But Toronto’s Primetime program — like SXSW’s Episodics, which launched last year — represents something different: Rather than expanding the »

- Justin Chang and Peter Debruge

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Why Mr. Robot is the summer’s most (and least) original new series

26 August 2015 9:16 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

In the opening minutes of the pilot for USA’s Mr. Robot, superhacker Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek) meets with the shifty proprietor of a chain of coffeeshops. Over the course of their conversation, Elliot reveals the flaws in his cybersecurity—flaws that enabled Elliot to uncover this fellow’s immense cache of child pornography. The topic shifts: Who is Elliot? What does he want? Money? Before long, though, Elliot heads out and the cops storm in to mete out justice. That, it would seem, will be the blueprint for Mr. Robot: the story of yet another maladjusted genius with One Weird Trick for solving crimes while disregarding the rules, man. He’ll track down hidden bad guys, overcoming his obvious social awkwardness and seemingly timid nature, and expose them to the world with the help of cutting-edge, buzzword-heavy technological innovation. After all, this is USA, the home of Burn Notice, »

- Simon Howell

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Review: 'Public Morals' Takes a Familiar World and Makes It Addictively Fresh

25 August 2015 10:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Hypothetical situation: There's a new TV show coming out from a well-known filmmaker. It's a period drama directed by a favorite of the festival circuit and penned by an innovative, independent screenwriter. In fact, all 10 episodes of the cable series about cops and gangsters working together to keep the peace in 1960s New York are directed and written by this same successful actor who also stars in the hour-long episodes. In addition to the filmmaker, it's got a solid cast — including one Oscar winner — and none other than Steven Spielberg as an executive producer.  If this show was on HBO, Netflix or AMC, the entire TV world would be abuzz with anticipation. The fervor might not equal that of "True Detective" — as this more-than-hypothetical series doesn't star anyone at Matthew McConaughey's level of fame — but the demand for auteur-driven television after the success of Nic Pizzolatto's anthology series, »

- Ben Travers

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Review: 'Public Morals' Takes a Familiar World and Makes It Addictively Fresh

25 August 2015 10:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hypothetical situation: There's a new TV show coming out from a well-known filmmaker. It's a period drama directed by a favorite of the festival circuit and penned by an innovative, independent screenwriter. In fact, all 10 episodes of the cable series about cops and gangsters working together to keep the peace in 1960s New York are directed and written by this same successful actor who also stars in the hour-long episodes. In addition to the filmmaker, it's got a solid cast — including one Oscar winner — and none other than Steven Spielberg as an executive producer.  If this show was on HBO, Netflix or AMC, the entire TV world would be abuzz with anticipation. The fervor might not equal that of "True Detective" — as this more-than-hypothetical series doesn't star anyone at Matthew McConaughey's level of fame — but the demand for auteur-driven television after the success of Nic Pizzolatto's anthology series, »

- Ben Travers

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How 'Brazil' gave me the answers to life, the universe, and everything

24 August 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I never had a crisis of faith, because I never had any real faith in the first place. My parents were not wildly religious, but it was important to their lives in a general sense. My father's mother was a church organist, and my mother's mother was active in her own church in any number of ways. Both of my grandmothers lived in Memphis, so when we'd visit them, we'd have to make sure to schedule a trip long enough to show up at each of their churches at least once, just so they got to show off their grandchildren to their friends. In the life of my parents, church always seemed to serve primarily a social function. We moved frequently because of my dad's work as an engineer, and every place we moved, they became active in their local church. Each time, they made friends and they found a »

- Drew McWeeny

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‘The Knick’s’ Production Designer Explains How He Re-created 1900s New York

20 August 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Howard Cummings’ creative partnership with director Steven Soderbergh stretches back over two decades, but Cummings never expected it would take him to 1900 New York.

“(Steven) called me the day before I was going to start another job,” Cummings says of the offer to work on period drama “The Knick,” which would result in his second Emmy nom. “I was about to fly to Argentina. He sent me a text saying, ‘Dude, you’re gonna pass up 1900 New York?’”

Besides already being committed elsewhere, Cummings couldn’t think of a reason to turn his friend down.

“How often do you get to do that?” he says of the project’s unique time and place. Besides, he notes that “other than ‘Behind the Candelabra,’ which we did together, no one would hire me for a period project,” and this would be a calling card like no other.

Soderbergh directed, shot and edited »

- Geoff Berkshire

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‘The Knick: The Complete First Season’ DVD Review

20 August 2015 6:53 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

What do you get if you cross a period drama set in the early twentieth century, and a medical drama? The answer is The Knick, a Steven Soderbergh directed television show at the deadly cutting edge of surgery… Set in New York’s Knickerbocker Hospital the show focuses on the lives of the people who work there. From Dr. John W. Thackery (Clive Owen) the cocaine addicted head surgeon, Dr. Algernon Edwards (Andre Holland) the brilliant new doctor looked down on because of his skin colour, to the rich families that fund the hospital, we get a taste of hospital life at its darkest.

There is an annoying undertone to The Knick, but this annoyance has a point. Edwards is a doctor who is quite simply brilliant, but this isn’t accepted by most around him. Because of prejudices against his skin colour the doctors push him down, even try »

- Paul Metcalf

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Andre Holland interview: The Knick

19 August 2015 9:52 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We sat down with Andre Holland, who plays Algernon Edwards in Steven Soderbergh's suberb period medical drama, The Knick...

The Knick offers a frantic tour of a racially-charged New York, difficult doctors and messy early twentieth century surgery. We caught up with Andre Holland, who plays surgeon Algernon Edwards, to talk about double consciousness, arrogant surgeons and finding fake blood under your fingernails... The Knick is a show that revels in tension and never more so than with Algernon, who falls between so many positions. Is this something that you’ve consciously built into the character? A lot of it was already there on the page but it’s definitely something that I felt like I understand and have lent a certain amount of dimension to. I did a lot a research on this part and one of the things I read was W. E. B. Du Bois and »

- michaeln

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DVD Review: 'The Knick'

18 August 2015 1:13 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Adding fuel to the long-running argument that quality television is overtaking and even overriding the contemporary cinematic landscape is The Knick (2014), whose first season establishes itself as the kind of expansive serial storytelling the likes of which, indeed, are scarcely seen on the big screen or even the small. Since Steven Soderbergh (Sex, Lies and Videotape, Behind the Candelabra) announced his retirement from feature directing, he has - like so many of his peers - turned his attention to both the aesthetic and narrative possibilities of television, serving as executive producer and director of all ten episodes of this bravura piece of televisual filmmaking.

»

- CineVue UK

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Box Office: ‘Straight Outta Compton’ Debuts to Scorching $56.1 Million

16 August 2015 7:20 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Straight Outta Compton” may take place more than two decades ago, but its themes of racial tension, poverty and police brutality still speak to moviegoers living in a post-Ferguson world.

The biopic about rap group N.W.A debuted to a blistering $56.1 million this weekend in 2,757 theaters, surpassing “American Pie 2” to become the biggest-ever August debut for an R-rated movie. It’s the kind of opening usually reserved for so-called tentpole movies that trade in costumed heroes and special effects, not urban violence.

“The movie tapped into something in our culture and that made it more of a must-see,” said Phil Contrino, vice president and chief analyst at BoxOffice.com.

Its debut nearly doubles “Straight Outta Compton’s” budget of $29 million in a single weekend, meaning the film could be among the most profitable releases of the summer. N.W.A members Ice Cube and Dr. Dre helped produce »

- Brent Lang

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The Knick, The Duff, The Town That Dreaded Sundown, Run All Night, Song One, Still the Water, Open Range – reviews

15 August 2015 11:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Steven Soderbergh’s gory hospital drama is grotesquely human, Pygmalion is reworked with sass and Kevin Costner puts soul into the sagebrush

“There is simply too much television,” opined John Landgraf, CEO of cable network FX, last week, prompting applause and derision in approximately equal measure. For the purposes of this humble column, he’s right: several much-discussed recent series make their DVD debuts tomorrow, and while I’d like to weigh in on Wayward Pines or Humans, the 24-hour day has other ideas. I can, however, join the chorus of approval for The Knick (Warner, 15), which admittedly jumped ahead in my small-screen queue owing to some big-screen bias on my part: Steven Soderbergh retains must-see status in any medium for this dedicated follower.

Because of his supposed retirement from feature film-making, this 10-episode medical drama is the most Soderberghian viewing experience we’re going to get. Set in New »

- Guy Lodge

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Weekend Report -'Compton' Another Universal Smash

15 August 2015 8:39 PM, PDT | Box Office Mojo | See recent BoxOfficeMojo.com news »

Universal is estimating that Straight Outta Compton made $56M in 2,757 theaters, a remarkable $20,345 per screen average. Compton easily bested the other wide release, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., which is under-performing with an estimated $13.5M. The Top 12, at $133.6M, is up 4% from last year when The Expendables 3 shocked many by opening in 4th place with $15.9M, beaten not only by holdovers Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Guardians of the Galaxy but by the other newcomer to the schedule, Let's Be Cops, which opened to $17.8M. If Compton ends up with actuals of $56M that would make it the sixth best August opening of all time, coming in ahead of 2011's Rise of the Planet of the Apes with $54M but behind Signs with $60M in 2002. The well-reviewed bio-pic of the rap group N.W.A., was produced, along with others, by original band members Ice Cube and Dr. Dre, as well as by their director, »

- Keith Simanton <mail@boxofficemojo.com>

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Review: "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." (2015) Starring Henry Cavill And Armie Hammer

15 August 2015 3:44 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

There's a tasteless old joke that defines "mixed emotions" as the reaction you would have upon hearing that your mother-in-law just drove off a cliff in your new Jaguar. As a die-hard fan of "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." TV series, I admit to having expectations of experiencing mixed emotions at  last Monday's world premiere of Guy Ritchie's feature film version of the show at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York. For those of us who grew up during the spy craze of the mid-1960s, espionage movies are always close to our hearts. With Bond, Bourne and Mission: Impossible still big box-office, it's clear that the younger generation is in synch with our passion for this genre. The Bond films have earned respect for enduring for more than 50 years with six different actors giving vastly different interpretations of Agent 007, each successful in his own way. However, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Thomas S. Hammock: The Hollywood Interview

14 August 2015 2:23 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Thomas S. Hammock Digs Deep With The Last Survivors

By Terry Keefe

With the growth of technology over the past decade, it’s become possible for literally anybody to record a song, write a book or make a movie. With the inundation of content into the marketplace, it’s become more difficult than ever before for real filmmakers to get their work made, seen and, perhaps most significantly, monetized. Hollywood wants $300 million-budgeted tentpole comic book movies that will play as well in Beijing and New Delhi as they do in Muncie and Canoga Park. The indie film movement, once occupied by names like Quentin Tarantino, P.T. Anderson and Steven Soderbergh during its 1990s heyday, is basically non-existent now, those filmmakers having moved on to big-budget (or at least bigger than their salad days), more epic filmmaking. Many aspiring directors and producers find this landscape to be a bleak one, akin »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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The objective is to dramatically overreact in new trailer for Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Sicario’

14 August 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

While 2014 saw Emily Blunt take up arms against an invading alien army in Edge of Tomorrow, she’ll be wielding a gun later this year as part of the Us War on Drugs in Sicario.

The film is the newest directorial effort from Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve, and has just released a new trailer. Villeneuve directs from a script by actor and first-time screenwriter Taylor Sheridan, working with a cast that includes Emily Blunt, Benicio Del Toro, Josh Brolin, and Victor Garber.

The film’s synopsis is as follows:

An idealistic FBI agent is enlisted by an elected government task force to aid in the escalating war against drugs at the border area between the U.S. and Mexico.

The trailer sets the dialogue’s moral ambiguity against the thumping strains of Big K.R.I.T.’s “Saturday=Celebration”. This is Villeneuve’s second Us production, after 2013’s Prisoners, and cinematographer Roger Deakins, »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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The great poster riddle: why the Lance Armstrong movie promo looks familiar

14 August 2015 9:51 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

When inspired movie-poster art like The Social Network is created, similarities inevitably follow in promos from The Program to The Kings Speech

You might notice something familiar about the poster for Stephen Frears’s upcoming Lance Armstrong biopic The Program. To the left of Ben Foster’s face are the words “Champion Hero Legend Cheat,” and while this effectively articulates what makes the disgraced cyclist such a compelling figure, the inspiration for the tag line is instantly recognisable. Like so many other efforts from recent years, The Program arguably owes a debt to the most surprisingly influential movie poster of the past decade: Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg was likewise represented on the poster for 2010’s The Social Network as “Punk Prophet Genius Billionaire Traitor.”

The Social Network poster was the work of Neil Kellerhouse, the go-to graphic designer for Steven Soderbergh and David Fincher, noted for his minimalist technique and unconventional use of type. »

- Jason Ward

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'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' (2015) Movie Review

12 August 2015 1:10 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

From top to bottom, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. is a good movie and good in some surprising ways. A pair of performances from Henry Cavill and Elizabeth Debicki are outstanding in a movie that's not only fun, but so tongue-in-cheek it's almost sincere. There are some nits to pick and overall it's rather slight, which prevents it from being downright wonderful, but none of this takes away from its overall entertainment value. Henry Cavill's performance as post-World War II smuggler-turned-cia-spy Napoleon Solo trumps any recent iteration of James Bond when it comes to playing the suave, debonaire and downright cool secret agent. This isn't to say that's necessarily what they were going for, but I'll be damned if director Guy Ritchie's intent wasn't to throw a little jab 007's way, dressing Cavill in Savile Row suits, almost visibly winking at Sean Connery along the way. Come to think of it, »

- Brad Brevet

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‘Man From U.N.C.L.E.’: Guy Ritchie’s Journey to Bring Spy Series in From the Cold

12 August 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Directors including Steven Soderbergh, Quentin Tarantino and Matthew Vaughn once circled the project, as did stars like George Clooney, Bradley Cooper, Ryan Gosling and Channing Tatum. However, the hoped-for bigscreen adaptation didn’t get real traction at Warner Bros. until Guy Ritchie, the director who reimagined the studio’s 2009 blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” and its sequel two years later, pitched his take.

“There were several screenplays along the way, but it never got to the starting line before Guy,” says Greg Silverman, president of creative development and worldwide production at Warner Bros. Pictures. “It needed a direction, it needed someone who had a point of view and a real voice. It’s very particularly Guy Ritchie’s ‘Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ ”

That said, “U.N.C.L.E.,” which cost $75 million to produce, and tens of millions more to market and release, poses a sizable risk for the Burbank studio. »

- Jenelle Riley

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

1-20 of 311 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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