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Cinepocalypse 2017 Review: Psychopaths is Mickey Keating’s Most Ambitious Film Yet

  • DailyDead
At the age of just 26 or 27, writer/director Mickey Keating already has five feature films under his belt. These aren’t just homemade backyard projects shot with his buddies for $200, either; these are movies with major stars of the indie horror scene (Graham Skipper, Lauren Ashley Carter, Pat Healy, Larry Fu**ing Fessenden) and getting actual distribution through companies like Glass Eye Pix and IFC Midnight. While his previous films have shown major chops behind the camera, they’ve also all had an air of familiarity about them; Keating is a director who wears his influences proudly, and some of his past work has played more like him riffing on an existing piece than like something borne of his own interests and obsessions.

With his fifth feature, Psychopaths, Keating has really come into his own as a director. It is his most original, most ambitious, most audacious work to date
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: ‘American Satan’ is a Nightmare of Sex, Drugs, and Heavy Metal

American Satan is the kind of film that might very well pop up as an Alamo Drafthouse Weird Wednesday screening in the coming years. It’s a shame its distributor will probably not strike a 35mm print for the occasion. The film is a maddening hyper-nightmare of smoke, hypodermic needles, and hard rock that somehow is far more endearing than it ought to be, with a cast led by musician Andy Biersack as Johnny Faust, a recent high school graduate from Columbus, Ohio who lands in La seeking fame and fortune. Johnny and Vic (Booboo Stewart) fortunately have a plan: they hook up with UK-based group The Relentless — who’ve also come out to La seeking fame with manager Ricky (John Bradley) — and add a sexy rebel Cassandra (Tori Black) to the group. Pure talent isn’t enough as Johnny learns the hard way and soon the group finds themselves
See full article at The Film Stage »

Movie Poster of the Week: “Maigret Sets a Trap” and the Art of Nathan Gelgud

  • MUBI
This beautiful pair of illustrated posters for two late 50s Maigret adaptations by Jean Delannoy is the work of Nathan Gelgud, an artist who by now should be well known to cinephiles in New York and Los Angeles. Nathan is the creator of the auteur tote bag, an essential cinephilic fashion accessory for the 2010s, more on which later. Full disclosure: I was involved in the art direction on these posters at Kino Lorber, whose repertory division is re-releasing Maigret Sets a Trap (originally released in the Us as Inspector Maigret and later re-released as Woman Bait) at Metrograph today and will be releasing both films on Blu-ray in December. I’d been aware of Nathan’s work for a while, but it was his comic-book style resumé poster for Metrograph’s Alain Tanner retrospective this summer that convinced me he’d be perfect for Maigret. And, as luck would have it,
See full article at MUBI »

Canon Of Film: ‘Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans’

This week, we will be taking a look at Werner Herzog’s ‘Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans’. For the story behind the genesis of Canon Of Film, you can click here.

Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans (2009)

Director: Werner Herzog

Screenplay: William Finkelstein

If there ever was a better example of how to show the old adage true that it’s not what the film is about but rather, how it’s about it… Abel Ferrara’s 1992 masterpiece ‘Bad Lieutenant‘, took place on the streets of New York and starred Harvey Keitel as a “bad lieutenant”. He wasn’t even given a name in the film. He did every drug he could, he pulled over women to sexually harass them, he screwed hookers, and gambled large amounts of money. In between, he tries to solve a crime, haphazardly involving the rape of a local nun. I met
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

A ‘mother!’ of a Vicious Commentary

There’s no easy way to describe Darren Aronofsky’s latest film, the appropriately titled mother! (appropriate once the pieces start crashing into place). It’s oppressively heavy on symbolism, it’s profoundly unsettling, it’s guaranteed to piss off practically audience member in one way or another. To be blunt: it’s pure Aronofsky and, if its reception from both the Venice and Toronto Film Festivals to the scathingly polarizing reaction its had in its first weekend of release are any indicator, it’s going to cement itself with ease as one of the most thoroughly debated experiences of the 21st century. Whether that’s a good thing or a bad thing is up to you.

In a beautiful countryside manor amidst lush fields and the warmest sunsets (all beautifully brought to life by regular Aronofsky Dp Matthew Libatique and production designer Philip Messina) lives a couple – given no names in the story,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Crime of Passion

Witness the ‘fifties transformation of the femme fatale, from scheming murderess to self-deluding social climber. Barbara Stanwyck redefines herself once again in Gerd Oswald’s best-directed picture, a searing portrayal of needs and anxieties in the nervous decade. With fine support from Raymond Burr, Virginia Grey and Royal Dano.

Crime of Passion

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1957 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 84 min. / Street Date September 5, 2017 /

Starring: Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling Hayden, Raymond Burr, Fay Wray, Virginia Grey, Royal Dano.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Art Direction: Leslie Thomas

Original Music: Paul Dunlap

Original Story and Screenplay by Jo Eisinger

Produced by Herman Cohen, Robert Goldstein

Directed by Gerd Oswald

A key title in the development of the Film Noir, 1957’s Crime of Passion shows how much the style had departed from the dark romanticism and expressive visuals of the previous decade. The best mid-’50s noirs strike a marvelously cynical and existentially bleak attitude regarding crime and society.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tiff: Elle Fanning is "Mary Shelley"

Our ongoing adventures at Tiff

In the summer of 1816 legendary Romantic literary figures Mary Shelley (and stepsister Claire Clairmont), Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and Dr John Polidori were holed up in a Swiss estate and challenged each other to write scary ghost stories. From that fateful contest two famous works of horror emerged ("Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus" in 1818 and "The Vampyre" in 1819 -- neither of them actual ghost stories!). Ken Russell attacked this collision of authors with his trademark sexual abandon and visual insanity in Gothic (1986) and his wasn't the first or last film to stare with fascination at that morbid contest 201 years ago. We return to that summer for a good chunk of Haifaa al-Mansour's Mary Shelley but with far different intent.

Haifaa al-Mansour, the first Saudi female film director (she previously directed Wadjda) is more interested in the trailblazing of Mary Shelley (née Godwin) as a
See full article at FilmExperience »

Have Your Say: What is Your Favorite "Altered State" Movie?

After last week's epic discussion on the future of movie watching, I figured it best to approach this week's Hys with something a little less... daunting. Kinda. This past Saturday I unexpectedly found myself rewatching Ken Russell's Altered States for the fourth time. Despite any shortcomings the film may have (look up its troubled production history to get a taste of the root problems) I found myself falling back in love with Russell's wildly exciting ride through the very stuff of life and the cosmos. This got me thinking about the mutability of cinema and how it is a medium that easily attracts stories of transformation, great and small, of the mind, and of the body... and of the spirit. So I present to you...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Best War Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Dunkirk’ to ‘The Hurt Locker’

The Best War Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Dunkirk’ to ‘The Hurt Locker’
Ron Perlman would have us believe that war never changes, but the movies about it certainly have. The last 15 years have brought no shortage of films about the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan (for obvious reasons), but World War II continues to fascinate filmmakers most of all. That includes Christopher Nolan, whose recent hit “Dunkirk” manages to bring something new to a genre that constantly feels at risk of becoming old hat.

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Is Too Loud For Some Viewers, But Christopher Nolan Says That’s the Way He Likes It

And while those two conflicts have dominated the genre of late, everything from the Civil War to the Battle of Red Cliffs has found powerful expression onscreen. Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” tells us that “war is a drug,” and the films below suggest that movies about war are just as addictive — maybe even more so.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Jonathan Sothcott interview: producing independent films in the UK

Kirsten Howard Aug 8, 2017

Producer Jonathan Sothcott talks about running an independent film company in the UK, finding the right project and a post-Brexit industry.

Jonathan Sothcott has had a hand in producing a whole lot of independent films here in the UK over the last decade. You may have even seen a fair few of them yourself, especially if you’re a Danny Dyer completest.

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He’s the man behind Hereford Films, the production and financing company he runs with partner Damien Morley. If that name rings a bell, it might well be because Morley owns a modelling agency that takes care of most of the Page 3 girls, and the entrepreneur has even recently launched a bid to buy the Page 3 brand off The Sun himself.
See full article at Den of Geek »

What is the purpose of Art without transgression? Arachny in the UK - Salem Kapsaski's Spidarlings (2016)

I first got to know Salem in 2006 when we discussed the writings of Andrea Dworkin and Emma Goldman in an online group. We started to correspond in private, exchanged our writings and ideas and finally met in person, when Salem directed my theatre play "That Abortion Play" at “T-Decadence” in Athens in 2010 where he also studied Film at the New York Film School. In the previous year Salem had worked as a production assistant at Argento's “Giallo” and we had talked often about him making a horror film. This is where I got to read first scenes of “Spidarlings” In 2011 production of “Spidarlings” started in London and was right away over-shadowed by the sudden death of the unforgettable Ken Russell who had...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Best Queer Films You Didn’t Know Were Queer, From ‘Fight Club’ To ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’

  • Indiewire
The Best Queer Films You Didn’t Know Were Queer, From ‘Fight Club’ To ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’
Hanky codes. Septum piercings. A knowing glance. Since we’ve been around (at least as far back as ancient Greece), queer people have learned to read between the lines to find kindred spirits out in the world — and onscreen. While straight cinephiles scratched their heads at the recent claim that Jennifer Kent’s “The Babadook” is a queer icon, Lgbt audiences were unsurprised: We have always known how to make our own fun.

Read More: The 11 Most Exciting Queer Films of 2017 So Far

Old Hollywood movies had to dance around overtly queer stories, although that didn’t stop them from scoring big with thematically queer classics “Some Like It Hot,” “Rope” and “Rebecca.” (To say nothing of any movie musical ever made). The tides of change slowly but surely progressed throughout the ’70s and 80’s, on to the New Queer Cinema boom of the ’90s. However, even after the success of “Moonlight,
See full article at Indiewire »

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)
(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in July

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in July
Sundance goes online in July, with a trio of buzzy, well-reviewed indie pictures from the festival surfacing on streaming sites. Meanwhile, Netflix drops a star-studded dramedy, a cult video-game series adaptation awash in blood and Jason Bateman breaking bad; Amazon presents both an original F. Scott Fitzgerald adaptation; and Shudder offers a tour of the unhinged, psychotronic mind of Flying Lotus. You need a guide to July's streaming highlights? Boom. We've got your back.

Altered States (Hulu, July 1st)

During the Sixties, scientist John C. Lilly was a pioneer on the frontier of consciousness,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tilda Swinton Reveals How Ivanka Trump Inspired Her Villainous ‘Okja’ Character

  • Indiewire
Tilda Swinton Reveals How Ivanka Trump Inspired Her Villainous ‘Okja’ Character
Tilda Swinton is precisely as enigmatic, eloquent, and insightful as you think she is. In a recent interview with The Wrap, the Oscar-winner mused thoughtfully about her sixth film to play the Cannes Film Festival, Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja.” Swinton is an executive producer on the project, a fantastical political satire about a friendship between a young girl and a hippo-like creature named Okja. Set in an alternate reality, Okja was genetically engineered by a greed-fueled corporation. Swinton plays an eccentric villain named Lucy Mirando, head of the Mirando Corporation.

Read More: ‘Okja’ Review: Bong Joon Ho Delivers His ‘E.T.’ With Delightful Tale of a Mutant Pig and the Girl Who Loves Her — Cannes 2017

In the interview, Swinton describes her character as “heir to a rotten great fortune built on the corrupt and morally repugnant initiatives carried out by her father.” Sound familiar? Yes, but Swinton being Swinton, she
See full article at Indiewire »

The Young Girls of Rochefort

Perhaps motivated by the success of La La Land, Criterion has reissued two impressive Jacques Demy musicals as separate releases. This all-singing, all-dancing homage to candy-colored vintage Hollywood musicals is a captivating Franco-American hybrid that allows free rein to Demy’s marvelously positive romantic philosophy.

The Young Girls of Rochefort

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 717

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 125 min. / Les Demoiselles de Rochefort / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 11, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Catherine Deneuve, Françoise Dorléac, Danielle Darrieux, George Chakiris, Gene Kelly, Michel Piccoli, Jacques Perrin

Cinematography: Ghislain Cloquet

Production Designer: Bernard Evein

Film Editor: Jean Hamon

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Produced by Mag Bodard, Gilbert de Goldschmidt

Written and Directed by Jacques Demy

I was going to squeak by reviewing only Jacques Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, but the interest in the new La La Land prompted some emails and messages that tell me a revisit of the charming
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Ghostwatch’ Scared So Many People That BBC Only Aired It Once — 25 Years Later, You Can Finally Watch It Again

‘Ghostwatch’ Scared So Many People That BBC Only Aired It Once — 25 Years Later, You Can Finally Watch It Again
You don’t have to believe in ghosts to believe in “Ghostwatch.” BBC aired the infamous, ahead-of-its-time mockumentary on Halloween night, 1992, creating such an uproar with the program that it never made the airwaves again. Twenty-five years later, “Ghostwatch” can finally be seen again: As it did with “The Devils,” Ken Russell’s oft-censored, long-unavailable act of feature-length blasphemy, horror streaming platform Shudder has made the film available to stream.

Presented by the Beeb as a totally above-board enterprise, the 90-minute special purports to seek (and perhaps even offer) irrefutable proof that ghosts do in fact exist. The organizers do so by spending the night in a house that’s said to be haunted, with an entire team both in the studio and out in the field live; the coverage resembles that of a high-profile footie match. Well-known presenters play themselves in the production, which only makes it more understandable
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Ghostwatch’ Scared So Many People That BBC Only Aired It Once — 25 Years Later, You Can Finally Watch It Again

  • Indiewire
‘Ghostwatch’ Scared So Many People That BBC Only Aired It Once — 25 Years Later, You Can Finally Watch It Again
You don’t have to believe in ghosts to believe in “Ghostwatch.” BBC aired the infamous, ahead-of-its-time mockumentary on Halloween night, 1992, creating such an uproar with the program that it never made the airwaves again. Twenty-five years later, “Ghostwatch” can finally be seen again: As it did with “The Devils,” Ken Russell’s oft-censored, long-unavailable act of feature-length blasphemy, horror streaming platform Shudder has made the film available to stream.

Presented by the Beeb as a totally above-board enterprise, the 90-minute special purports to seek (and perhaps even offer) irrefutable proof that ghosts do in fact exist. The organizers do so by spending the night in a house that’s said to be haunted, with an entire team both in the studio and out in the field live; the coverage resembles that of a high-profile footie match. Well-known presenters play themselves in the production, which only makes it more understandable
See full article at Indiewire »

Faux Supernatural Documentary Ghostwatch (1992) Comes to Shudder

  • DailyDead
Officially streaming for the first time in the United States on Shudder is the infamous BBC faux documentary, Ghostwatch. For those not familiar with Ghostwatch, it was presented to viewers as part of a BBC anthology series called Screen One as a legitimate live investigation of the paranormal.

Press Release: Today, Shudder, the premium thriller, horror, and supernatural streaming service backed by AMC Networks, releases the BBC’s infamous faux-paranormal documentary Ghostwatch for the first time ever in the United States.

Produced as a part of the BBC anthology series Screen One, it was presented as a live television investigation of paranormal activity, not as a scripted TV movie. It was banned after the premiere because of disturbed viewers making an estimated 30,000 panicked calls to the BBC switchboard in a single hour. Ghostwatch was never re-aired on UK television, it never aired in the United States, and has never been
See full article at DailyDead »
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