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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2002

14 items from 2015


More Than 'Star Wars' Actress Mom: Reynolds Shines Even in Mawkish 'Nun' Based on Tragic Real-Life (Ex-)Nun

23 August 2015 5:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Debbie Reynolds ca. early 1950s. Debbie Reynolds movies: Oscar nominee for 'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,' sweetness and light in phony 'The Singing Nun' Debbie Reynolds is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 23, '15. An MGM contract player from 1950 to 1959, Reynolds' movies can be seen just about every week on TCM. The only premiere on Debbie Reynolds Day is Jerry Paris' lively marital comedy How Sweet It Is (1968), costarring James Garner. This evening, TCM is showing Divorce American Style, The Catered Affair, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and The Singing Nun. 'Divorce American Style,' 'The Catered Affair' Directed by the recently deceased Bud Yorkin, Divorce American Style (1967) is notable for its cast – Reynolds, Dick Van Dyke, Jean Simmons, Jason Robards, Van Johnson, Lee Grant – and for the fact that it earned Norman Lear (screenplay) and Robert Kaufman (story) a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination. »

- Andre Soares

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Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

5 August 2015 11:27 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills. »

- Andre Soares

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1978’s The Legacy Makes its Bluray Debut

20 July 2015 8:42 PM, PDT | Horror News | See recent Horror News news »

1978’s The Legacy Makes its Bluray Debut

Scream Factory Presents The Legacy On Blu-ray September 15, 2015 Starring Katherine Ross, Sam Elliott and Roger Daltrey It is a birthright of the living death…Scream Factory proudly presents the Blu-ray debut of The Legacy on September 15, 2015. This release comes complete with a new HD transfer and bonus features, including new interviews with ...

Hnn | Horrornews.net - Official News Site »

- Horrornews.net

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Scream Factory Set To Unleash Sam Elliot-led shocker The Legacy This September

20 July 2015 5:22 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

2015 has already been a good year for DVD/Bluray releases from the gang at Scream Factory, with many new and old titles being released quite regularly. Everything from Tobe Hooper’s Invaders From Mars to the upcoming special feature-heavy Bluray of Wes Craven’s The People Under The Stairs, Sf have given genre fans exactly what they’ve asked for. While those fan favorites are awesome and are most definitely worth picking up, the films I’m excited for the most, are the somewhat forgotten gems that Scream Factory are set to unleash, like the Pierce Brosnan-led Nomads and the subject of this announcement, the 1978 Sam Elliot film The Legacy. The film, which also stars Katherine Ross and The Who’s Roger Daltrey in supporting roles, and was directed by Return Of The Jedi director Richard Marquand is hitting Bluray on September 15th, complete with new special features as well. »

- Jerry Smith

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The Legacy Blu-ray Release Details & Cover Art

20 July 2015 2:24 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Scream Factory has detailed their plans for the Blu-ray release of The Legacy, revealing the list of bonus features and the fact that this this will be a new HD transfer from the inter-positive:

"It is a birthright of the living death...Scream Factory proudly presents the Blu-ray debut of The Legacy on September 15, 2015. This release comes complete with a new HD transfer and bonus features, including new interviews with film editor Anne V. Coates and special effects artist Robin Grantham.

How far would you go to inherit everlasting life? When Margaret (Katharine Ross, The Stepford Wives) and her boyfriend Pete (Sam Elliot, Frogs, Road House) have a car accident in the English countryside, the other driver offers to take them to his lavish country estate to make amends. But once there, they are surprised to learn that all of the other houseguests are already expecting them! It's not long »

- Jonathan James

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Songs on Screen: 'Streets of Fire's Lost Masterpiece 'I Can Dream About You'

25 June 2015 11:10 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Songs On Screen: All week HitFix will be featuring tributes by writers to their favorite musical moments from TV and film. Check out all the entries in the series here.  When we talk about underrated directors, it's hard not to mention Walter Hill.  Hill is an underrated director, the way Michael Ritchie and Peter Yates were underrated directors, the way Roger Donaldson, Joe Dante, and Fred Schepisi are underrated directors. They’re all underrated because it’s only when you look at their filmographies that the numbers start to total up and you realize, boy, he directed a lot of really good movies.   In Hill’s case, that list includes "The Warriors," "48 Hours," "The Long Riders," "Southern Comfort,: "Hard Times," "Trespass," and "Wild Bill."  Some great.  Some solid.  (My personal favorite of those is Hard Times, a pulpy film about bare-knuckle boxers in the Great Depression.)  There were clunkers »

- Michael Oates Palmer

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Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

19 June 2015 4:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The »

- Andre Soares

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Ten Weddings and No Funerals: The Greatest Cinematic Nuptials

18 May 2015 5:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

There are few rituals in life more chaotic, confounding and magical than the wedding. Appropriately, marriages have provided the backdrop for many a story spun through the ages. Whether it’s sending out multitudes of wedding invitations, choosing the right dress, or whether to seat Aunt Mabel next to her second or fifth ex-husband at the reception, weddings both in life and on film are almost always guaranteed to bring forth a surge of emotions. Below are a few of our favorite cinematic nuptials:

1. The Searchers (1956)

John Ford’s western masterpiece is full of many iconic moments, not the least of which is one of the screen’s greatest knock-down, drag-out fights between Jeffrey Hunter and Ken Curtis for the hand of comely Vera Miles. Martin Scorsese loved this scene so much, he paid homage by having his characters watch it in Mean Streets (1973).

2. Rachel Getting Married »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Round-Up: Mad Max: Fury Road Legacy Featurette, The Legacy (1979) & Innerspace Blu-rays

16 April 2015 4:53 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

"I remember a time of chaos... but most of all, I remember the Road Warrior. The man we called 'Max.'" In anticipation of the Mad Max: Fury Road premiere, the 35+ year history of George Miller's dystopian franchise is celebrated in a new featurette. Also included in our latest round-up is a newly announced Blu-ray from Scream Factory that should please Sam Elliott and Katharine Ross fans, as well as the special features and cover art for Warner Bros.' Innerspace high-definition home media release.

Mad Max: Fury Road: Press Release -- "From director George Miller, originator of the post-apocalyptic genre and mastermind behind the legendary “Mad Max” franchise, comes “Mad Max: Fury Road,” a return to the world of the Road Warrior, Max Rockatansky.

Haunted by his turbulent past, Mad Max believes the best way to survive is to wander alone. Nevertheless, he becomes swept up with »

- Derek Anderson

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The Graduate Screens Friday Night at Webster University

14 April 2015 8:59 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Oh no, Mrs. Robinson. I think, I think you’re the most attractive of all my parents’ friends. I mean that!”

The Graduate  will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium Friday April 17th at 7:30pm.

The Graduate (1967), director Mike Nichols’ second feature after he debuted with Who’S Afraid Of Virginia Wolf? (1966), is still a delightful classic and a nostalgic piece of its time, to say the least. Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman, 30 years old at the time, convincingly playing someone a decade his junior) is fresh out of college, and comes back to his rich parents’ house in a California suburb. Bored and undecided about what to do with his life, Benjamin is seduced by a friend of the family, middle-aged Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft, who was actually only 36). When Mrs. Robinson’s daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross) shows up, Benjamin is forced to take her on a date. »

- Tom Stockman

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Stop in the Name of Love: Top Ten Forbidden Romances in the Movies

13 March 2015 6:12 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Human beings and their affectionate vibes are something special. After all, we as individuals are going to love who we feel are worth loving. However, society demands that the protocol of loving should be straight-forward and “natural”. The rule of thumb: stick to your own kind! Whether it is being loyal to your own kind racially or culturally or either with your own age range the expectation of romance is defined…do not make waves and keep things safe and mainstream!

Well, human beings can be also unpredictable and live for going against the grain especially certain characters and personalities in the movies. Love and romance make for great film fodder but when the notion of such on-screen amorous activities takes its theme to a whole new challenging level then the gloves are off!

In Stop in the Name of Love: Top Ten Forbidden Romances in the Movies we will »

- Frank Ochieng

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Katharine Ross Looks Back on Being a Young TV Star in the ’60s

5 February 2015 2:09 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Before Katharine Ross garnered an Oscar nomination for “The Graduate,” the actress was working in a San Francisco theater troupe and starting to catch fire with guest roles on TV in the early 1960s. She’s onstage on Valentine’s Day at the Malibu Playhouse production of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters,” starring opposite her real-life husband, Sam Elliott.

Your first notice in Variety was for the San Francisco Actors Workshop production of something called “Twinkling of an Eye.”

And I’m not even sure that we even opened!

So it was more learning experience than thespian breakthrough?

It was where I learned I was bitten by the acting bug. But I actually learned a lot because we all did all of the jobs on the production from acting to ticket-taking to props.

Did your stage work lead to getting cast on television?

I did hear about a casting call »

- Steven Gaydos

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Two of Redford's Biggest Box-Office Hits on TCM Tonight

6 January 2015 5:20 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Redford movies: TCM shows 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,' 'The Sting' They don't make movie stars like they used to, back in the days of Louis B. Mayer, Jack Warner, and Harry Cohn. That's what nostalgists have been bitching about for the last four or five decades; never mind the fact that movie stars have remained as big as ever despite the demise of the old studio system and the spectacular rise of television more than sixty years ago. This month of January 2015, Turner Classic Movies will be honoring one such post-studio era superstar: Robert Redford. Beginning this Monday evening, January 6, TCM will be presenting 15 Robert Redford movies. Tonight's entries include Redford's two biggest blockbusters, both directed by George Roy Hill and co-starring Paul Newman: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which turned Redford, already in his early 30s, into a major film star to rival Rudolph Valentino, »

- Andre Soares

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The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

30. Apollo 13 (1995)

Lost to: Braveheart

In 1995, director Ron Howard brought a true life story of hope in the face of peril and started sweeping up awards. He won the Directors Guild Award. He won the Producers Guild Award. He won the Screen Actors Guild Ensemble Award. He lost the Golden Globe Drama to “Sense and Sensibility,” though he was nominated. Nothing could beat “Apollo 13.” Oscar night came and the Academy decided to hand the award to Mel Gibson’s historical epic about William Wallace, whose only precursor award was a surprise directing win at the Golden Globes. I’m not saying “Apollo 13″ is a greater film than “Braveheart.” It’s just proof that even the mighty may fall if a charismatic actor/director is at the helm.

29. L.A. Confidential (1997)

Lost to: Titanic

Curtis Hanson’s neo noir wasn’t the only quality loser from 1997 (“Good Will Hunting, »

- Joshua Gaul

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2002

14 items from 2015


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