IMDb > Mickey Rooney > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Mickey Rooney (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 67 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Top 10 films Of 2012: The Muppets

22 December 2012 3:01 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Simon Brew Dec 27, 2012

Our countdown of our favourite films of 2012 arrives at the cinematic revival of The Muppets...

Soaring back onto the big screen for the first time since Muppets From Space, The Muppets finally made it to the UK in 2012. It was worth the wait. It's made it up this high in our top ten films of the year poll amongst our writers not necessarily by earning lots of first place placements, but instead by appearing on so many people's top five lists somewhere. Ladies and gentlemen, The Muppets...

6th place: The Muppets

The decision by Disney to keep the UK waiting an extra three months for the British release of The Muppets has had, you might have noticed, an unexpected side effect. Whilst the film is ostensibly a 2011 release, it didn't make it to the UK until February 2012. And given that our criteria for film of 2012 is »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


The 5 Most Ridiculous Movies to Win the Golden Globe for Best Picture

14 December 2012 7:16 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Every year the Hollywood Foreign Press Association announces its Golden Globe nominations, and every year we wonder why this rococo freakshow matters. In years past, clunkers like The Tourist and Burlesque have been nominated for Best Picture, and to the HFPA's credit, neither of those ridiculous movies ended up winning Best Picture. Unfortunately, the five I've listed below either won Best Comedy/Musical or Best Drama, and you'll likely agree that these embarrassments remain stinky all these years later.

Here they are, the five worst movies to win the biggest Golden Globe of the night.

5. Evita

I'm obviously an elite-level Madonna fan, but I'm also the first to admit that Evita is un-special. Madonna's performance is serviceable and Antonio Banderas' is a bit better, but to me Andrew Lloyd Webber's rather muted spectacle is the least interesting thing about Madonna in the '90s. And yes, I remember "Nothing Really Matters. »

- virtel

Permalink | Report a problem


Which Movie Scenes Piss You Off?

5 December 2012 12:51 PM, PST | MTV Movies Blog | See recent MTV Movies Blog news »

You know how some scenes just really get to you and make you inexplicably mad? Whether it's a moral choice a character makes and you don't agree with or an old cliche that bugs you every time, there's no getting over these sequences.

Inspired by a recent Reddit thread, we asked some of our writers to voice their opinions and share the scenes that irk them to no end.

Harvey's Miraculous Car Crash in "The Dark Knight"

I believe in Harvey Dent. I don't believe in Harvey Dent being able to shoot the driver of a car he's riding in without getting completely destroyed in the ensuing crash. For a film series so firmly "grounded in reality," that scene (among others) makes absolutely zero effing sense. -Josh Wigler, MTV Splash Page Editor

Nuking the Fridge

If the idea of doing a fourth Indiana Jones weren't enough to dissuade viewers, then »

- MTV Movies Team

Permalink | Report a problem


Win! Brit-Flick ‘St. George’s Day’ On DVD!

29 November 2012 6:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

In association with Metrodome, we’ve got 3 DVD’s to giveaway of the brutal and brilliant UK Brit-flick St. Georges Day. The film is Frank Harper directorial debut. Starring Harper (Lock, Stock And Two Smoking Barrels), Craig Fairbrass (Cliffhanger), Vincent Regan (300), Neil Maskell (Kill List), Luke Treadaway (Attack The Block), Keeley Hazell (Like Crazy), Charles Dance (Game Of Thrones), Jamie Foreman (Nil By Mouth) and Ashley Walters (Anuvahood) this is a suspense filled drama of two cousins and their one last big job before retirement beckons.

At the top of their game, respected and revered by fellow gangsters, cousins Ray Collishaw (Craig Fairbrass) and Mickey Mannock (Frank Harper) plan the biggest robbery of their careers when a drug drop goes awry. Pursued by the angry Russian mob Mickey persuades reluctant Ray to do one last job for the family. Under the guise of an England vs Germany football friendly, masked by football hooliganism, »

- Dan Bullock

Permalink | Report a problem


'Giant,' 'Cleopatra' and 8 more of Elizabeth Taylor's best movies

25 November 2012 9:00 AM, PST | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

"National Velvet" (1944): Elizabeth Taylor's star-making role casts her as a young jockey who teams with a novice trainer (Mickey Rooney) to enter England's celebrated Grand National horse race.

"Father of the Bride" (1950): Taylor is a charmer as the original "Bride" whose upcoming wedding turns her father (Spencer Tracy) into a nervous wreck.

"A Place in the Sun" (1951): Director George Stevens won an Oscar for guiding Taylor and others through the drama of an ambitious man (Montgomery Clift) torn between two lovers.

"Giant" (1956): It's easy to see how Taylor's lovely Leslie becomes the woman between a Texas rancher and a rebel (Rock Hudson, James Dean) as she teams again with director Stevens - again an Oscar winner here - on this sprawling version of Edna Ferber's novel.

"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958): Taylor makes an excellent Maggie to Paul Newman's Brick and »

- editorial@zap2it.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Dick Van Dyke And Carl Reiner At "The Comic" Screening November 20, L.A.

16 November 2012 8:55 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Carl Reiner’s 1969 film The Comic stars Dick Van Dyke as Billy Bright (the film’s original title), a character inspired in part by the life of  an aspiring silent film comedian who ultimately ends up ruining his career due to his troubled and self-destructive nature. Co-starring Michele Lee and Mickey Rooney, The Comic is a film that most contemporary audiences are not aware of. Rarely (if ever) aired on television or cable, the film received both VHS and laserdisc releases in the 1980’s and 1990’s, respectively. Audiences will have their chance to see the film on a big screen on November 20, 2012 when the New Beverly in Los Angeles presents a rare screening of the movie. Actor Dick Van Dyke and director Carl Reiner are due to make personal appearances at the screening.

Click here to find out more information and purchase tickets.

Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Simon Pegg: 'I don't like the idea of visibility'

20 October 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

I still get star-struck on set It's not even being nerdy; I'm just being honest. I was involved in Paramount's 100th anniversary photograph and it was the most incredible day; everyone from Mickey Rooney to Justin Bieber and all in between were there – Nicholson, De Niro, Scorsese, Spielberg – and I was sat with them having pictures taken. And I was like, "I'm from Gloucester, so what does this mean?" The truth is, it means nothing, but it was extremely exciting. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Martin Landau: without a Hitch

18 October 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

He was friends with James Dean, dated Marilyn Monroe and made his movie debut with Hitchcock: Martin Landau, the voice of Mr Rzykruski in Frankenweenie, talks about his 60-year acting career

Midway through the interview, at the end of a monologue during which he has first marvelled at the way I can access the internet on my tape-machine (I can't) and then upset the coffee table by crossing his legs, Martin Landau checks and gives a rueful smile. "Anyway," he says. "You asked me a question a while ago. I'm sort of going on and on like a dial-tone here."

By this point it's clear that an audience with Landau will not run on conventional lines. Questions are not so much questions as prompts: an invitation for the actor to embark on another strolling pastoral through his 60-year career. He talks about the craft of acting, the actors he has »

- Xan Brooks

Permalink | Report a problem


The Forgotten: Slow Fade

17 October 2012 9:44 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

There are films from late in the great directors' careers which inspire passionate devotion among the more avid fans, films for which excuses have to be made, and films which inspire pained embarrassment. For me, the late films of Blake Edwards sometimes fall into all three camps, but then some of his earlier films do too: Mickey Rooney's enthusiastic personation of Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany's must surely cause pangs of discomfort to even the most devoted admirers of Audrey Hepburn.

Sunset (1988) perhaps has the edge on some the films immediately before and after, because it's clearly inspired by real love, not so much of movies or movie people, but what Alan Rudolph has called "movie-ness." Let's unpick that.

The loose and unsatisfying plot involves the 1929 murder of a Hollywood madam at a brothel where the prostitutes are styled to resemble movie stars (cue truly cringe-worthy don't-look-alikes and »

- David Cairns

Permalink | Report a problem


Does Homeland just wave the American flag? | Rachel Shabi and Alex Andreou

16 October 2012 3:07 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Take two: Homeland viewers Rachel Shabi and Alex Andreou debate the politics of the hit TV drama series

The debate rages on among Homeland fans. Some find the Emmy-winning TV show to be a tool for Us propaganda, others see it as a show willing to take political risks. We asked two of our contributors to debate the issue.

Rachel Shabi

We were gripped by the first series of Homeland, Alex, but didn't you also find it annoying? Leave aside the too-perfect-looking actors, the dummy wife and the wooden script – a greater irritation is that this drama was billed as a nuanced take on the Us "war on terror".

Instead, Homeland presents a retuned version of the same unshakeable assurance that, even when things are really complicated, American values are the fairest, the most right and the best. Sure, the series shows Us forces doing terrible things: covering up a »

- Rachel Shabi, Alex Andreou

Permalink | Report a problem


The Worst of Disney's Direct-to-dvd Sequels Arrives on Blu-ray

1 October 2012 1:01 AM, PDT | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Typical of Disney’s direct-to-dvd phase of sequels, Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp’s Adventure does a disservice to the original Lady and the Tramp by offering no creativity in its story, instead just reversing the formula and having a house dog who dreams of living the free life enjoyed by the mutts in the junkyard. What’s worse is that it also throws in a number of grating musical numbers that will make anyone who grew up on films from Disney’s golden age shudder in disgust. When the credits roll on this mercifully short but embarrassingly shameless money-grab, it’s obvious that having Chazz Palminteri, Alyssa Milano, and Mickey Rooney does nothing to elevate it.

Read more...

»

- Lex Walker

Permalink | Report a problem


TV listings and previews: plan your week's viewing - 1-5 October

1 October 2012 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

This week, Masters of Money takes a fresh look at Karl Marx, Mrs Biggs reaches its conclusion and Strictly Come Dancing gets serious

Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

MondayMasters Of Money

9pm, BBC2

In the final part of this timely series, BBC economics editor Stephanie Flanders urges us to shrug off our shackles and storm the barricades. Or at least asks us to consider whether Karl Marx had a point. The 19th-century German intellectual, of course, argued that while capitalism needed to be swept away, it would collapse by itself in any case. Flanders wonders whether his theories might provide answers to the mess we're now in – and also attempts to separate his economic analysis from atrocities committed in his name. Ali Catterall

Monroe

9pm, ITV1

James Nesbitt's brain surgeon/miracle worker/purveyor of witty one-liners returns for a new series of the medical drama. There's a new boss »

- Ali Catterall, Andrew Mueller, Phelim O'Neill, Martin Skegg, John Robinson, Ben Arnold, Mark Jones, Hannah Verdier, Jonathan Wright, David Stubbs, Gwilym Mumford, Julia Raeside

Permalink | Report a problem


John Moffatt obituary

16 September 2012 11:08 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Classical actor who graced the stage with decorum and stillness

Although perhaps best known as Hercule Poirot, Agatha Christie's moustache-twirling detective, on BBC radio, John Moffatt, who has died aged 89, was a devastatingly clinical and classical stage actor of irreproachable taste and valour. He seemed something of a throwback, but there are very few today who could rival his armour-plated technique, his almost uncanny empathy with comic style ranging from the Restoration to Rattigan – his trademark stillness and decorum on stage was at odds with false notions of flounce and frilliness – or his incisive articulation.

He was a beacon in his profession, greatly admired and loved, not least because he had worked with almost everyone of note in the business, from his idols Noël Coward and John Gielgud, to his best friends Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Alec McCowen and Joan Plowright, but chiefly because he was so funny and modest about his own contribution. »

- Michael Coveney

Permalink | Report a problem


Mel Stuart obituary

13 August 2012 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Film director known for Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and Wattstax

Mel Stuart, who has died aged 83, became widely known for directing two radically dissimilar films, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and Wattstax. The former, which Stuart called "the most rewarding experience of my career", was a garish and joyfully warped musical adaptation of Roald Dahl's novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Received without enthusiasm on its release in 1971, the movie became over the next few decades a children's favourite, though its psychedelic overtones extended its appeal beyond that core audience. "Although I have been a film-maker for over 40 years," Stuart wrote in 2001, "Willy Wonka is the one work that has reached out to and been embraced by a wide audience."

Wattstax, released two years later, also acquired a cult following, one which might have increased had music rights issues not made the film hard to see until the late 1990s. »

- Ryan Gilbey

Permalink | Report a problem


Extended Thoughts on ‘The Fox and the Hound 2′

31 July 2012 8:57 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Fox and the Hound 2

Directed by Jim Kammerud

Written by Roger S.H. Schulman and Rich Burns

Starring Reba McEntire, Patrick Swayze, Jeff Foxworthy

There are a few sure ways to get me uninvolved in a story, and prequels are at the top of the list. Considering how prevalent prequels are in our culture these days, it’s worth clarifying why they almost always do nothing for me. I’m sure, for example, I’ll go into more detail on this topic when we discuss Monsters University on the podcast next summer, but now’s just as good a time to get into it. What prequels do chiefly is eliminate tension. For this discussion, we can extend that into midquels, a shudder-worthy term referring to stories that take place within the larger timeline of its predecessor. Whether it’s a prequel or a midquel, such a story features as »

- Josh Spiegel

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Dance is the Highlight in Simplistic ‘Step Up Revolution’

28 July 2012 8:39 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The beauty of the movies is their ability to create weird parallel universes, where young dance crews have the choreography skills of a hip-hop Bob Fosse, the time/funding to create this dance and a law enforcement culture that allows it. Welcome to the “Step Up Revolution.”

Rating: 3.0/5.0

This the fourth installment of the Step Up series of films, and the first two helped launch the career of Channing Tatum. There is a major difference in this chapter – instead of dance crews competing with one another, they use their choreographic power to create flash mobs. This makes for some energetic and entertaining dance moments in this exercise, but the story between the grooves is ludicrous and laughable. But were there ever such complaints about a Mickey Rooney/Judy Garland similarity back in the day? As in those features, it’s not about the story, it’s about hey-kids-let’s-put-on-a-flash-mob. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Extended Thoughts on ‘The Fox and the Hound 2′

28 July 2012 2:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Fox and the Hound 2

Directed by Jim Kammerud

Written by Roger S.H. Schulman and Rich Burns

Starring Reba McEntire, Patrick Swayze, Jeff Foxworthy

There are a few sure ways to get me uninvolved in a story, and prequels are at the top of the list. Considering how prevalent prequels are in our culture these days, it’s worth clarifying why they almost always do nothing for me. I’m sure, for example, I’ll go into more detail on this topic when we discuss Monsters University on the podcast next summer, but now’s just as good a time to get into it. What prequels do chiefly is eliminate tension. For this discussion, we can extend that into midquels, a shudder-worthy term referring to stories that take place within the larger timeline of its predecessor. Whether it’s a prequel or a midquel, such a story features as »

- Josh Spiegel

Permalink | Report a problem


Ted Review

25 July 2012 5:30 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: Seth MacFarlane

Cast: Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis, Seth MacFarlane, Jessica Stroup, Giovani Ribisi, Norah Jones, Patrick Stewart

Running time: 106 minutes

Certificate: 15

Synopsis: When John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) was a little boy, he wished for his teddy bear to come to life and be his friend forever. His wish came true, but as John grew up, so did Ted (voiced by Seth MacFarlane), into a pot smoking, foul mouthed slacker. John’s lifelong friendship with Ted is putting his relationship with Lori (Mila Kunis) under pressure. Can John grow up enough to leave his teddy bear behind?

Regarding comedy, Seth MacFarlane is known mainly for two things: bad taste and letting jokes run for far too long. Both apply to Ted, which is a very funny film that doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. It also seems reluctant to give any jokes to women, but let’s start at the beginning. »

- John Sharp

Permalink | Report a problem


Not Available On DVD – Baby Face Nelson

23 July 2012 8:18 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Director Don Siegel’s low-budget 1957 crime drama Baby Face Nelson is a fast -paced portrait of a cold-blooded, trigger-happy sociopath with a memorable mad-dog performance by Mickey Rooney in the title role and is a film that deserves to be rediscovered.

Baby Face Nelson (real name Lester Gillis) was a petty thief who gained much celebrity (and a spot on the FBI’s 10 most wanted list) when he joined John Dillinger’s gang in 1933. Baby Face Nelson opens with Nelson being approached to kill a union boss. He refuses, is framed for the murder anyway, sent to jail, escapes, and gets bloody revenge on the men who framed him. His loyal girlfriend Sue is with him when he robs a pharmacy and Nelson is shot. Sue drives him to a country hospital run by a crooked underworld doctor. It’s here that Nelson meets Dillinger and joins his crew. The »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


It’S A Mad Mad Mad Mad World Screens At The Academy

12 July 2012 3:59 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

On Monday evening the Academy presented a cast and crew reunion from director Stanley Kramer’s It’S A Mad Mad Mad Mad World. It was the inaugural film in “The Last 70mm Film Festival” series. The first guest I noticed at the reception was writer Bruce Vilanch wearing his Simpsons “Krusty the Clown” t-shirt. When I asked him about his choice of wardrobe he said, “because it was going to be a night filled with Clowns.” The evening was off to a fun start.

Script Supervisor Marshall Schlom, Casting Agent Lynn Stalmaster, Mrs Karen Kramer, and actors Marvin Kaplan, Barrie Chase, Carl Reiner, Jonathan Winters, and Mickey Rooney were all there at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. The evening was hosted by surprise emcee Billy Crystal. As I moved about the filled room, I couldn’t help but be in awe of the Hollywood history that had gathered together. »

- Michelle McCue

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 67 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners