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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997

14 items from 2017


40 Years Ago in a Galaxy Far, Far Away, ‘Star Wars’ Was Born

12 May 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

On March 24, 1976, Variety reported that George Lucas had begun filming “Star Wars,” an $8 million film for Fox, in Tunisia. Alec Guinness would play “a bearded old desert rat who was once a leading general in galactic wars.” The article continued that the three younger leads hadn’t yet been revealed, but a few weeks later, Mark Hamill was announced as Luke Starkiller — yes, that was his name then — in “the outer-space comedy-adventure.”

After the movie’s May 25, 1977, opening, our front page proclaimed “Star Wars Best Start Since Jaws,” citing the nearly $2.6 million at 43 locations (an average of almost $60,000 per theater). On June 10, Variety reported “The direct cost of the film was about $10 million. Fox has 60% of the profits, Lucas 40% (from which he dealt out points to others). Break-even is estimated in the neighborhood of $22 million-$25 million.”

In 2017, it’s shocking to think anyone even speculated about whether “Star Wars” would break even. »

- Tim Gray

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Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art

26 April 2017 2:25 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The great filmmakers who came to prominence in the 1970s — and Jonathan Demme, who died Wednesday, was one of them — had stylistic traits that made them iconically identifiable. Robert Altman had his multi-character hubbub, Martin Scorsese had his volcanic rock ‘n’ roll virtuosity, and Francis Ford Coppola had his lavishly scaled operatic grandeur. But Demme, vivid and stirring as his filmmaking voice was, had no such obvious signature. You could almost say that he was defined by his lack of signature.

What defined a Demme film was the open-eyed flow of its humanity, the way his camera drank in everyone on screen — it didn’t matter whether the character was a goofy truck driver, a derelict billionaire, the troubled wife of a mobster, a new wave rock ‘n’ roller, or a serial killer — and took the full measure of their life and spirit. For Demme, the magic of movies resided »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Oscar-Winning Director Jonathan Demme Passes Away at 73

26 April 2017 10:53 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Director Jonathan Demme, who won an Oscar for directing the 1991 Best Picture winner The Silence of the Lambs, has passed away earlier this morning at the age of 74. According to a source close to the family, the filmmaker passed from esophageal cancer and complications from heart disease. The filmmaker had been treated for esophageal cancer in 2010, and while he did recover, the cancer came back in 2015, and sources said his condition had deteriorated in recent weeks. We have assembled a number of tweets below from filmmakers and actors paying their respects to this iconic director.

IndieWire first broke the news this morning, as tributes have started to flood in from filmmakers such as Edgar Wright, James Wan and actors such as Denis Leary, Michael Chiklis and many more. Jonathan Demme was born February 22, 1944 in Baldwin, Nassau County, New York to Dorothy Louise (Rogers) and Robert Eugene Demme, a public relations executive. »

- MovieWeb

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Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs’ Director, Dies at 73

26 April 2017 8:10 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme died Wednesday in New York of cancer complications, his publicist told Variety. He was 73 years old.

Demme is best known for directing “The Silence of the Lambs,” the 1991 horror-thriller that was a box office smash, a critical triumph, and introduced moviegoers to Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal Lecter, a charismatic serial with a yen for Chianti, fava beans, and cannibalism. The story of a novice FBI analyst (Jodie Foster) on the trail of a murderer became only the third film in history to win Academy Awards in all the top five categories ( picture, actor, actress, director, and adapted screenplay), joining the ranks of “It Happened One Night” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Though he had his greatest success terrifying audiences, most of Demme’s work was looser and quirkier. In particular, he showed a great humanism and an empathy for outsiders in the likes of “Melvin and Howard, »

- Brent Lang and Carmel Dagan

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18 actors whose characters were cut out of movies in post-production

24 April 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Apr 28, 2017

The actors whose role in a film was shot, but chopped out of the final cut...

Yep, I know. I’ve read lists like this too, and I know that Eric Stoltz was cut out of Back To The Future. If it’s all well and good, I’ll leave that example out.

See related  Alien 5 to ignore Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection Alien 5: will it ever happen?

What I’ve tried to find here is a mix of reasonably known and less known instances of an actor being cut out of a film after they’ve filmed sequences for it. I’ve also tried to get to the reason they were left out as well.

Whilst all this may still sound like an exercise in clickbait, being cut out of a production does have a consequence beyond ego hurting a bit. For the side effect »

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Newswire: R.I.P. Don Rickles, comedy icon

6 April 2017 12:14 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

As confirmed by Variety, legendary insult comic Don Rickles—who is probably better known to younger people as the voice of Mr. Potato Head in the Toy Story movies—died this morning from kidney failure. He was 90.

Born in Queens and raised in a Yiddish-speaking household, Rickles described himself as the clown of his high school and, later, his naval unit. As an 18-year-old, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy during World War II with the intention of entering the Special Services as an entertainer; instead, he was put on board the U.S.S. Cyrene as a Seaman First Class. Rickles served in the Philippines for two years, returning to the U.S. in 1946 to begin his career as a performer in earnest.

Hoping to become an actor, Rickles attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, where his classmates included Grace Kelly, Jason Robards, and Anne ...

»

- Sam Barsanti, Kyle Daly

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Review: Sam Peckinpah's "Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia", Blu-ray Special Edition From Arrow

8 March 2017 5:22 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Darren Allison

Attending a film festival in the mid-seventies, Sam Peckinpah was once questioned about how the studios regularly bastardised his vision, his intension and more specifically, if he would ever be able to make a ''pure Peckinpah'' picture. He replied, '’I did 'Alfredo Garcia' and I did it exactly the way I wanted to. Good or bad, like it or not, that was my film.''

The overall narrative for Alfredo Garcia is neither complicated nor convoluted. Warren Oates plays Bennie, a simple pianist residing in a squalid barroom in Mexico. He is approached by two no-nonsense Americans (Robert Webber and Gig Young) who are attempting to track down Alfredo Garcia. The womanising Garcia is the man responsible for the pregnancy of Theresa (Janine Maldonado) the teenage daughter of a powerful Mexican boss El Jefe (Emilio Fernández). In a display of power, El Jefe offers »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Spielberg, Hanks and Streep to team for The Post

7 March 2017 12:10 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Steven Spielberg is set to direct Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep in a new film called The Post. The dream team was announced yesterday via trade blog Deadline.

The Post is a drama about the Washington Post’s role in exposing the Pentagon Papers in 1971, and how the Post’s editor Ben Bradlee and publisher Kay Graham challenged the federal government over their right to publish them.

The Pentagon Papers was the name given to a secret Department of Defense study of U.S. political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967, prepared at the request of Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara in 1967.

Jason Robards won a 1974 Best Supporting Actor Oscar portraying a Watergate-era Bradlee in All the President’s Men. In this film Hanks is set to play Bradlee, while Streep would play Graham.

This will be the fifth time that Hanks has worked with Spielberg, following the films Saving Private Ryan, »

- Paul Heath

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Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep to Star in Steven Spielberg's Pentagon Papers Film

6 March 2017 6:16 PM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Multiple Oscar winners Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep will appear together on the big screen for the first time in Steven Spielberg's The Post, a film about the Pentagon Papers scandal.

Hanks will portray legendary Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee while Streep will play the newspaper's publisher Kay Graham, the Hollywood Reporter writes.

The film focuses on the Post's battle against the federal government over the right to publish the top-secret documents from Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara's voluminous, warts-and-all account of the Vietnam War.

After military analyst »

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Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, and Meryl Streep Team for ‘The Post’

6 March 2017 11:38 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Adding yet another title to his packed slate, Steven Spielberg‘s is partnering his Amblin Entertainment with Fox for The Post, which Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep will lead and which has a Liz Hannah-penned screenplay concerning one of the most horrifying pieces of information ever uncovered by American journalists. The stars will, respectively, play Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee and publisher Kay Graham, whose discovery of documents known as the Pentagon Papers revealed the extent to which the then-recent Johnson administration had lied about the Vietnam war — the extent of various campaigns, the outright existence of others, and how effectively the battle was being waged. [Deadline]

The New York Times first published information that was then carried on by the Washington Post following Nixon and co’s attempts to squelch the leaks, thus linking the story, in some sense, to All the President’s Men, in which Bradlee was portrayed by Jason Robards. »

- Nick Newman

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Hollywood Flashback: When Julianne Moore's 'Magnolia' Monologue Bloomed in Berlin

13 February 2017 10:59 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Berlin Film Festival attendees were dropped into the San Fernando Valley back in 2000, when Paul Thomas Anderson screened his California-set ensemble drama Magnolia, Julianne Moore’s second film with her Boogie Nights director. Also starring Tom Cruise, William H. Macy, John C. Reilly, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jason Robards and Patton Oswalt, among many others, the 188-minute tapestry of intertwining Los Angeles lives and their coincidental losses already had been met with mixed reviews in the weeks before its Berlinale gala screening.

The Hollywood Reporter summarized the debate as either “a masterful work of the cinematic arts or a self-indulgent day-in-our-lives concept »

- Ashley Lee

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70s Rewind: Comes A Horseman, James Caan and Jane Fonda in a Western

3 February 2017 7:00 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Who would follow up a tense, real-life political drama with a relaxed Western set in the 1940s? Alan J. Pakula, that's who. Pakula directed All the President's Men, which was released in April 1976, in the thick of the Watergate scandal. The movie received eight Academy Award nominations and won four, including Jason Robards for best supporting actor and William Goldman for best adapted screenplay. Released in October 1978, Comes a Horseman starred James Caan (?!), Jane Fonda and Jason Robards as ranchers in a gorgeous yet unidentified area of the western United States. Circa 1945, Frank 'Butch' Athearn (Caan) and Billy Joe Meynert (Mark Harmon, in the first film role for the former U.S. football player), are military veterans who have bought a small...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Robert Ellis Miller, ‘Reuben, Reuben’ Director, Dies at 84

30 January 2017 1:42 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director Robert Ellis Miller died Friday in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 84.

According to his nephew, the Emmy-nominated director, known for films “Reuben, Reuben” and “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter,” had been living at the Motion Picture Home for two years since his wife, documentarian Pola Chasman, died.

Miller had a varied career, working on features films, television films and on the board of the the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He also was responsible for elevating the profile of several well known actors such as Anthony Hopkins and Sondra Locke.

Beginning his career while a student at Harvard University, Miller served as president of the Harvard Dramatic Club before returning to his hometown of New York. There, during what he called his “repertory period,” he worked off-Broadway shows and in TV on the likes of “Route 66” and “The Twilight Zone.” This and other work earned »

- Dani Levy

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Robert Ellis Miller, ‘Reuben, Reuben’ Director, Dies at 84

30 January 2017 1:42 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Director Robert Ellis Miller died Friday in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 84.

According to his nephew, the Emmy-nominated director, known for films “Reuben, Reuben” and “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter,” had been living at the Motion Picture Home for two years since his wife, documentarian Pola Chasman, died.

Miller had a varied career, working on features films, television films and on the board of the the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He also was responsible for elevating the profile of several well known actors such as Anthony Hopkins and Sondra Locke.

Beginning his career while a student at Harvard University, Miller served as president of the Harvard Dramatic Club before returning to his hometown of New York. There, during what he called his “repertory period,” he worked off-Broadway shows and in TV on the likes of “Route 66” and “The Twilight Zone.” This and other work earned him both Emmy and DGA nominations before »

- Dani Levy

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997

14 items from 2017


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