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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87

9 July 2014 3:55 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rosemary Murphy, who appeared as the neighbor Maudie Atkinson in the classic 1962 film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” starring Gregory Peck, died Saturday in New York City. She was 87 and had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.BzHqOdBQ.dpuf Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash. »

- Carmel Dagan

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Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87

9 July 2014 3:55 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rosemary Murphy, who appeared as the neighbor Maudie Atkinson in the classic 1962 film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” starring Gregory Peck, died Saturday in New York City. She was 87 and had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.BzHqOdBQ.dpuf Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash. »

- Carmel Dagan

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Once Upon a Time in the West

3 July 2014 3:25 AM, PDT | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

One of the greatest westerns of all time, Sergio Leone's spaghetti masterpiece is the epic tale of a notorious outlaw (Jason Robards) and a harmonica-playing gunslinger (Charles Bronson) who join forces to save comely widow Claudia Cardinale from a ruthless railroad tycoon and his hired guns. In a casting masterstroke, perennial good guy Henry Fonda is a convincing candidate for the most cold-blooded killer in film history. »

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Cinema Centenarians: Among Oldest Film People Still Around Are Best Actress Oscar Winner; Actress with, gasp, Twilight Connection

17 June 2014 12:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Oldest person in movies? (Photo: Manoel de Oliveira) Following the recent passing of 1931 Dracula actress Carla Laemmle at age 104, there is one less movie centenarian still around. So, in mid-June 2014, who is the oldest person in movies? Manoel de Oliveira Portuguese filmmaker Manoel de Oliveira will turn 106 next December 11; he’s surely the oldest person — at least the oldest well-known person — in movies today. De Oliveira’s film credits include the autobiographical docudrama Memories and Confessions / Visita ou Memórias e Confissões (1982), with de Oliveira as himself, and reportedly to be screened publicly only after his death; The Cannibals / Os Canibais (1988); The Convent / O Convento (1995); Porto of My Childhood / Porto da Minha Infância (2001); The Fifth Empire / O Quinto Império - Ontem Como Hoje (2004); and, currently in production, O Velho do Restelo ("The Old Man of Restelo"). Among the international stars who have been directed by de Oliveira are Catherine Deneuve, Pilar López de Ayala, »

- Andre Soares

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Arthur Gelb, Longtime NY Times Editor, Dead at 90

20 May 2014 3:38 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Arthur Gelb, a longtime New York Times editor who served as Managing Editor from 1986-1989, died Tuesday, the Times said. He was 90. Gelb, who became president of the New York Times Co. Foundation after his mandatory retirement at age 65, joined the paper as a copy boy in 1944. Born Feb. 3, 1924 in East Harlem, he had a passion for theater and wrote articles that jump-started the careers of Woody Allen, Barbra Streisand, Lenny Bruce and Jason Robards. Along with his wife, Barbara, Gelb penned a biography of Nobel-winning playwright Eugene O'Neill in 1962. Also read: New York Times Publisher »

- Matthew Bramlett

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'The West Wing' oral history: 9 things you didn't know or forgot

13 May 2014 1:40 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Since Frank Underwood became president on Netflix’s House of Cards, I’ve had this geek fantasy of him debating Josiah Bartlet, Martin Sheen’s idealistic and professorial president from The West Wing. Bartlet’s Washington, D.C., was the proverbial shining city on a hill, a place where intelligent, well-intentioned people gravitated to do the peoples’ business. Underwood’s capital is the nasty underbelly of a trough coated by man’s craven pursuit of power for power’s sake. It’s practically Kennedy’s Camelot versus Nixononian realpolitik. To paraphrase Anthony HopkinsNixon in Oliver Stone’s 1995 movie, “When look at The West Wing, »

- Jeff Labrecque

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'Fitzcarraldo' (1982) Movie Review

6 May 2014 2:13 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Ten years after they first worked together on Aguirre, the Wrath of God, writer/director Werner Herzog would reteam with star Klaus Kinski for the fourth time, though it wasn't originally envisioned that way. In fact, I doubt Herzog would say much of Fitzcarraldo was how he originally envisioned it. This ambitious piece of genius cinema would take he and Kinski back into the Peruvian jungle for a film that seems to have been cursed from the start, but even curses are meant to be broken given the proper enchantment. Kinski came aboard the project, replacing original star Jason Robards, playing the lead role of Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald (aka Fitzcarraldo), an opera-loving Irishman determined to bring the opera to the jungles of Peru. Alongside him was to be his assistant Wilbur (Mick Jagger), but as production was delayed and Robards fell ill with dysentery, the production almost fell to pieces. »

- Brad Brevet

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On 'Star Wars' Day, a look at the franchise's Oscar history

4 May 2014 1:35 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Today is "Star Wars Day." You know, "May the fourth," because it sounds like "May the force (be with you)." Get It??? There has been plenty of "Star Wars" discussion this week as the people threatening to give us a seventh film in this storied franchise dropped a few casting details on the world. People like Oscar Isaac and Max von Sydow and Adam Driver will be joining old timers Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher for "Star Wars: Episode VII - Whatever Nifty Subtitle They Give It," and we'll probably be hearing about it constantly as the film forges on through production and post-production. To mark today's occasion, director J.J. Abrams and screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan offered up a video howdy, which you can watch below if these movies are your thing. In case it's not readily evident, they're certainly not my thing, but I can't very well be »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Al Capone In "Cicero"

25 February 2014 2:32 PM, PST | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

Development continues on "Cicero" starring actor Tom Hardy ("The Dark Knight Rises") as ruthless 1920's gangster 'Al Capone'.

Hardy said he has been working closely with Warner Bros, "watching their gangster films — the ones with James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart and Edward G. Robinson...it’s interesting to get them, and a bit of Capone, into the bloodstream… The idea isn’t to remake those films but to get a flavour of them as we explore Capone’s career as a racketeer."

The "Cicero" screenplay is by Walon Green, noted for writing director 'Bloody Sam' Peckinpah's classic western "The Wild Bunch".

Actors previously playing Capone in film include Rod Steiger, "Al Capone" (1959), Neville Brand, "The George Raft Story (1961), Jason Robards, "The St. Valentine's Day Massacre" (1967), Buddy Lester, "Poor Devil" (1973), Ben Gazzara, "Capone" (1975), Robert De Niro, "The Untouchables" (1987), Eric Roberts, "The Lost Capone" (1990), Anthony Lapaglia, "Road to Perdition" (2002), Jon Bernthal, »

- Michael Stevens

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James Woods interview: Leone, Casino, Oliver Stone, Hemdale

25 February 2014 8:23 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Interview Simon Brew 27 Feb 2014 - 05:44

In the first of a two part look back at his career, James Woods chats to us about family, Scorsese, Stone, Leone and more...

It took a false start or two before we finally got James Woods on the end of the phone. There was no agent connecting us, no middle person to monitor what we were saying. Just a problem with a charging cable, oddly enough.

When we were connected, we launched into an interview that was intended to last 15 minutes, but as it turned out, it passed the hour mark. And heck, we got through a lot: so much, that we've split this interview into two articles. A genuinely fascinating man.

Regular readers will know that we've been long-time fans of James Woods - as highlighted by our look at some of his least appreciated films, here - and as our conversation started, »

- sarahd

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9 Actors Who Earned Oscar Nominations For Playing Real People And Didn’t Deserve It

17 February 2014 8:35 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

We’re less than two weeks away from the Oscars, and that means it’s once again time for my favorite activity: griping about the past!

One of my biggest Oscar pet peeves is when actors who portray real-life roles garner more attention — for no good reason — than actors who portray fictional characters. The Academy has long been too pleased with big-named thespians who prove they can imitate recognizable figures. Sometimes the attention is justified (Sean Penn in Milk and Marion Cotillard in La Vie en Rose come to mind), but often real-life roles become filler nominees in the supporting categories. Here are nine examples of Oscar-nominated performances that caught fire with the academy simply for being based on a known personality.

1. Jason Robards as Howard Hughes in Melvin and Howard

Melvin and Howard is a movie that teaches you to appreciate its examination of a Utah man’s humdrum lower-middle-class existence, »

- Louis Virtel

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Touchstones & Legacies: Paul Thomas Anderson & Philip Seymour Hoffman

8 February 2014 8:52 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

On Sunday, February 8th, 2014, Philip Seymour Hoffman died at the untimely age of 46 in his New York City apartment. It was a piece of news that carried a variance in reaction and response, due to circumstance and of course timing. There can be no doubting that the primary emotion was shock; Hoffman joined the likes of Heath Ledger, River Phoenix, and James Dean as part of a club of actors who passed on before their time and left behind a towering legacy as well as a pall of resonant sadness. An actor leaving us is the most strange of phenomenon. As participants of travails into escapism, they form an emotional and cathartic bond with us, touching ours souls, making their demise far more powerful, far more sorely felt, than anyone else save friends or family. Through their on-screen journeys and the connections they make with the film fan, they truly become friends or family. »

- Scott Patterson

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Philip Seymour Hoffman was the one great guarantee of modern American cinema

4 February 2014 2:23 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In two decades of faultless performances, Philip Seymour Hoffman proved that his particular talent was to take thwarted, twisted humanity and ennoble it

The day after the premiere of Paul Thomas Anderson's 2012 film The Master, I was interviewing the director in the upstairs ballroom of a Venice hotel when Philip Seymour Hoffman walked past our table. The windows were flung open and the place was bathed with light, and the big, rangy actor bounced by gracefully, like a golden lion walking on air. "Phil's actually a really good dancer," Anderson confided, referencing the parlour routine in the middle of The Master, when the title character performs a jig with his nubile acolytes. "You might not think that to look at him, but he seriously is."

I don't know why we should have been surprised. Every good actor possesses a peculiar grace. Even Philip Seymour Hoffman, an ostensibly foursquare American Job, »

- Xan Brooks

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Philip Seymour Hoffman: Remembering the stage actor

3 February 2014 1:05 PM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Taking stock of an actor’s legacy on the stage is trickier than summing up a career on screen. After all, we can all go back and watch a film performance with the click of a mouse or by sliding in a DVD. Movies are endlessly available to us. The stage, on the other hand, is a living thing that varies from night to night. Some nights are magical, others less so. But when a show’s run ends, so does its life. It can be remembered, but not relived.

Maybe that’s why I feel incredibly lucky to be »

- Chris Nashawaty

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Top Five Philip Seymour Hoffman Performances

3 February 2014 11:30 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

In commemoration of the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, we’ve searched the archives and found a brilliant feature pinpointing his best performances, originally posted to celebrate the release of The Master. May he rest in peace.

In Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film, The Master, Philip Seymour Hoffman plays Lancaster Dodd, the leader of a philosophical movement who takes Joaquin Phoenix’s Freddie Quell under his wing and who definitely isn’t based on L. Ron Hubbard. Honest.

To celebrate the release of The Master, we looked at Hoffman’s filmography and attempted to narrow it down to his five greatest performances. In a career absolutely filled with them, it’s been tough to whittle them down, but these are the five roles that best exhibit his versatility; truly a modern master of the craft.

Magnolia (1999)

Magnolia is an ensemble piece largely remembered for Tom Cruise’s role, yet »

- Nathan Rhodes-Brandon

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The Adventures of Huck Finn

3 February 2014 2:18 AM, PST | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

Elijah Wood stars as Mark Twain's young runaway Huckleberry Finn in this smartly handled Disney drama. Set in America's Deep South during the 1840s, it follows the irrepressible vagabond as he befriends the escaped slave Jim (Courtney B Vance) only to find that their destinies are already intertwined. Ron Perlman, Robbie Coltrane and Jason Robards are amongst the many rogues and chancers who stand in the way of their freedom while director Stephen Sommers demonstrates the sense of adventure that made him a perfect fit for The Mummy series. »

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Earliest Best Actor Oscar Winner Has Died

1 February 2014 6:52 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Maximilian Schell dead at 83: Best Actor Oscar winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ (photo: Maximilian Schell ca. 1960) Actor and filmmaker Maximilian Schell, best known for his Oscar-winning performance as the defense attorney in Stanley Kramer’s 1961 political drama Judgment at Nuremberg died at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, on February 1, 2014. According to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, Schell died overnight following a "sudden and serious illness." Maximilian Schell was 83. Born on December 8, 1930, in Vienna, Maximilian Schell was the younger brother of future actor Carl Schell and Maria Schell, who would become an international film star in the 1950s (The Last Bridge, Gervaise, The Hanging Tree). Immy Schell, who would be featured in several television and film productions from the mid-’50s to the early ’90s, was born in 1935. Following Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938, Schell’s parents, Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Margarete Schell Noé, »

- Andre Soares

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Academy Award Winner Maximilian Schell Dies at 83

1 February 2014 11:59 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The AP is reporting that Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell, a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who became a Hollywood favorite and won an Oscar for his role as a defense attorney in “Judgment at Nuremberg,” has died.  He was 83.

Schell’s agent, Patricia Baumbauer, said Saturday he died overnight at a hospital in the Austrian city of Innsbruck following a “sudden illness.”

It was only his second Hollywood role, as defense attorney Hans Rolfe in Stanley Kramer’s classic “Judgment at Nuremberg,” that earned him wide international acclaim. Schell’s impassioned but unsuccessful defense of four Nazi judges on trial for sentencing innocent victims to death won him the 1961 Academy Award for best actor. Schell had first played Rolfe in a 1959 episode of the television program “Playhouse 90.”

Despite being type-cast for numerous Nazi-era films, Schell’s acting performances in the mid-1970s also won him renewed popular acclaim, earning him »

- Michelle McCue

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Maximillian Schell (1930-2014)

1 February 2014 8:08 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The most famous Austrian born actor prior to Schwarzenegger, and Oscar's favorite Austrian/Swiss actor ever, died overnight at 83. Maximilian Schell film debut came with the German anti-war film  Kinder, Mütter und ein General (Children, Mother, and the General) but it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling. 

He won a role supposedly through a misunderstanding/accident in the Brando/Clift vehicle Young Lions (1958). Global fame was just a few years away when he co-headlined the mega-star cast of the seminal Oscar Bait giant Judgement at Nuremberg (about Nazi war crime trials) with Hollywood legend Spencer Tracy and they were both were nominated for Best Actor - it's a oft-repeated fallacy of modern Oscar campaigning that people say that splits your vote and prevents you from winning; see also Amadeus. Schell also won the Golden Globe for that film. (As Rhett from Dial M for Movies pointed out on Twitter this morning, »

- NATHANIEL R

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Austrian-born Actor Maximilian Schell Dies at 83

1 February 2014 7:52 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell, a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who became a Hollywood favorite and won an Oscar for his role as a defense attorney in “Judgment at Nuremberg,” has died. He was 83.

Schell’s agent, Patricia Baumbauer, said Saturday he died overnight at a hospital in Innsbruck following a “sudden and serious illness,” the Austria Press Agency reported.

It was only his second Hollywood role, as defense attorney Hans Rolfe in Stanley Kramer’s classic “Judgment at Nuremberg,” that earned him wide international acclaim. Schell’s impassioned but unsuccessful defense of four Nazi judges on trial for sentencing innocent victims to death won him the 1961 Academy Award for best actor. Schell had first played Rolfe in a 1959 episode of the television program “Playhouse 90.”

Despite being type-cast for numerous Nazi-era films, Schell’s acting performances in the mid-1970s also won him renewed popular acclaim, earning him a best »

- Associated Press

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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