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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

21-40 of 84 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Will Reeve: Remembering My Superman Dad

16 June 2016 8:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

While to the rest of the world Christopher Reeve was Superman, to his son Will, he was just Dad. In an exclusive interview to be aired on the June 18 episode of People's List on ABC, Will Reeve, now 24, opened up about his beloved father and mother, Dana, who famously cared for her husband after he became paralyzed after a horseback-riding accident in 1995. "They were the people who told me to turn off the TV, to eat my broccoli, to go to bed," says Will. "I understand that not every child experiences going to the grocery store and seeing their dad »

- Jeff Nelson, @nelson_jeff

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Here's why Jude Law turned down the role of Superman

9 June 2016 1:25 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

There's a famous story about Warren Beatty turning down the role of Superman (which ultimately went to newcomer Christopher Reeve) after taking the suit home for the weekend and deciding he looked ridiculous. That's a solid reason! Now you can add Jude Law to the list of actors who were unwilling to sacrifice their so-called dignity to play the Man of Steel; in a new interview with Stephen Colbert, the actor says he turned down the role in the project that eventually became Bryan Singer's Superman Returns partly because he's English ("I don't know, it just didn't seem to fit") but also, mostly, because he couldn't stomach the idea of wearing the red-and-blue spandex over the course of an entire movie. "This director was very keen to meet, and impressed it upon me and I was actually out in California, and he said, 'look, you gotta try the suit on, »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Jude Law on why he turned down the role of Superman

8 June 2016 6:32 PM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Behind many of Hollywood's most famous roles are a line of actors who didn't get it, either because someone better came along or because the actor passed on the project themselves. When Bryan Singer was developing what would become Superman Returns, he was faced with finding an actor who could not only embody the man of steel, but follow in the footsteps of the late Christopher Reeve.... Read More »

- Kevin Fraser

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Village Of The Damned: 1960 v. 1995

7 June 2016 10:45 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

*A big fan of both versions of Village Of The Damned, Icons of Fright’s Jovy Skol wrote this piece about the differences between the two. Read on! -Jerry Smith

When I was a kid, my parents worked long hours often leaving me to be on my own during the day. They knew not to worry about me too much as I was not an outdoors child so the thought of a predator snatching me was from a threat. My interests were heavy on reading and watching movies. I was introduced to plenty of old movies thanks to classic marathons, originating my love for the original Planet Of The Apes franchise and Psycho. Another classic I found was the original Village Of The Damned. I was around eight years old at the time and had seen some TV spots for the John Carpenter remake, leaving me with a curiosity »

- Jerry Smith

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Examining Hollywood Remakes: Man of Steel

29 May 2016 8:49 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Since it’s Memorial Day, this seems like a good time to dissect the remake of the film about a (super) man who represents “truth, justice and the American way.” This week, Cinelinx looks at Man of Steel.

 He may not be quite as popular as Batman anymore, but there is no comic book superhero is who is more iconic and influential than Superman. He is one of the most well-known fictional characters world-wide (along with Sherlock Holmes, Tarzan and Dracula). Just as the introduction of the man of steel in 1938 began the super hero genre in comics, the debut of Superman: The Movie (1978) in theaters initiated the cinematic super hero genre.  It spawned 4 sequels (counting Superman Returns) and a spin-off (Supergirl). Years later, after numerous Marvel films had pulled in big wads of box office cash, Warner Brothers joined forced with Legendary Pictures to re-film the story of the last son of Krypton. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Chris Evans Loves Playing Captain America. Would Do It In Space! Or With Spidey!

26 May 2016 6:46 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

It's funny to think of the skepticism that met the announcement of Chris Evans as Captain America. When Marvel Studios revealed that Evans would be playing Steve Rogers in Captain America: The First Avengers, there was a ton of "But he was already The Human Torch!" combined with "He always plays cool smart asses! That's all wrong for Cap!"

And then a funny thing happened: Not only did he hit it out of the park in that first movie, but he has since become the anchor of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. His last two movies are considered to be among the best of Marvel's 13 cinematic entries so far, and his portrayal of Captain America has been hailed as one of the best actor/character combinations in a comic book movie since Christopher Reeve first donned Superman's cape in 1978. 

In the months leading up to Captain America: Civil War, »

- Mario-Francisco Robles

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Mfr Explores The Dceu's Road To Ruin: Column #3

20 May 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Welcome back to a special ongoing look at Warner Bros. and how it's handled its DC Comics properties. It's going to be a weekly, ongoing miniseries here at Lrm. This entry will look at Batman Begins, Superman Returns, Green Lantern, and more. We'll explore all of the interesting parallels and forks in the road that brought us to where the Dceu is today. 

Last week, we left off in 2004. Warner Bros. was preparing to relaunch its two DC Comics icons Superman and Batman, after flirting with jumping straight to a Batman Versus Superman movie. They backpedalled on that idea and, instead, poured all of their resources into re-establishing the characters as solo entities first, with the hope that a team-up or clash would eventually be in the cards.

Batman Begins

The first of these new films would be Batman Begins. Christopher Nolan, fresh off of critical successes with a few smaller films, »

- Mario-Francisco Robles

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Mike Gold: Hokey Smokes, DC, You Gotta Be Kidding Us

18 May 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

I remember back around 1978 when DC Comics publisher Jenette Kahn thought it might be time to replace the Milton Glazer “bullet” logo. Paul Levitz – who may or may not have liked that logo – said consistency is critical to branding and the bullet was only two years old. He turned to their marketing and promotion guy, who at the time happened to be me, and I chirped in agreement.

I wasn’t happy about saying that. I disliked the logo because it boogied up when it was reduced, particularly with those Silly Putty plates World Color was using back in those sing-along days. But Paul was right, and the Glazer logo stuck it out until 2005.

It was replaced by that italicized swirly logo which looked great on the big screen – better than some of their movies. That lasted only a few years and was replaced by the one they are using this week… »

- Mike Gold

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[Review] Elstree 1976

17 May 2016 1:04 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Everybody knows Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill, and Carrie Fisher. When Disney bought Lucasfilm from George Lucas and announced they’d be producing a new Star Wars trilogy and spin-off features, everyone knew those three would be back in the fold. Even guys like Peter Mayhew, Anthony Daniels, and Kenny Baker were known commodities to consult if not star underneath the costumes they made famous. But what of the other actors — the nameless, sometimes faceless, and almost always uncredited performers who were a part of something so universally revered? Does their being extras mean they weren’t as important to the legend? Fans lining up for autographs don’t think so. Anyone on set and immortalized in one of history’s greatest cinematic franchises is an unequivocal hero.

To people like me who love the series but never rendered it into a cornerstone of daily life, however, these smaller, hidden roles prove an intriguing curio. »

- Jared Mobarak

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Adaptation vs. Reinterpretation: The Two Approaches to Making Comic Book Films

14 May 2016 6:44 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Comic book-inspired films are wildly popular right now. Disney, Fox and Warner Bros are the leaders in bringing Marvel and DC super heroes to the big screen. There are two techniques for doing this…Adaptations and Reinterpretations. Which company uses which method? Cinelinx takes a look at these two techniques.

“Adaptation” means transferring a literary source to a new medium, like stage, film or television.

“Reinterpretation” means to recreate or rethink a work of art as a new conception.

Looking at these two definitions, you can make the argument that Disney does adaptations, while Fox prefers reinterpretation, and DC is somewhere in between. Let’s look at the two methods of bringing the heroes of Marvel and DC Comics to the screen to see if this argument holds up.

We’ll start with the Disney superhero films: Marvel makes adaptations. Their films essentially lift the characters off the page and, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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'Civil War' vs. 'Batman v Superman': What Marvel Is Getting Right

9 May 2016 12:28 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The spring's big comic-book movies feature the superhero trend du jour of good guys fighting one other: Batman takes on Superman, Team Captain America versus Team Iron Man. But these all-star team-ups — specifically, Warners/DC Comics' Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Marvel/Disney's Captain America: Civil War — are in a fight of their own, and not just to see who can come up with the more unwieldy title.

For years, DC had the prolific, and sometimes even Oscar-nominated comic book franchises, while its chief competitor's characters were »

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Captain America is the best movie superhero, and here's why

6 May 2016 1:20 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Typically, I’m in favor of articles that emphasize the world “favorite” over the word “best.” If you want to have a conversation about who your favorite superhero in any modern superhero movie is, there are dozens of candidates, and I’m sure every single character is someone’s favorite. However, I’m here today to make a case for one character as standing above every other superhero in modern movies as the best, the ideal, the person who is simply better than anyone else. After all, he’s got his third movie opening this Friday, the fifth he’s appeared in overall, and it’s time we all acknowledge what is abundantly clear by now: Captain America is the best. All three of the Captain America films are credited to the same screenwriters. Stephen McFeely and Christopher Markus managed to do something that no one else has done so far at Marvel, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Mfr Explores The Dceu's Road To Ruin: Column #1

6 May 2016 12:40 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Welcome to a special ongoing look at Warner Bros. and how it's handled its DC Comics properties. It's going to be a weekly, ongoing miniseries here at Lrm. This first entry will offer a bit of history, as we build towards what's happening in the present day Dceu. We'll explore all of the interesting parallels and forks in the road that brought us to where the Dceu is today.

Humble Beginnings...

Long before comic book movies dominated Hollywood; Long before comic books were looked upon as anything other than campy, youth-oriented entertainment; Long before Hollywood titans like Disney and 20th Century got into the business of building worlds out of superhero titles, a struggling film company merged with another conglomerate in a seemingly innocuous merger transaction. 

Warner Bros., which had begun its life in 1923 and would become one of the most important studios in Hollywood, was in an extremely vulnerable place in the mid-1960s. »

- Mario-Francisco Robles

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Supergirl season 2: Christopher Reeve cited as Superman influence

6 May 2016 1:23 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Aug 26, 2016

Christopher Reeve and George Reeves, as well as other Supermen, will influence Tyler Hoechlin's portrayal in Supergirl season 2...

The CW superhero shows' producer Andrew Kreisberg has been chatting to Collider about Tyler Hoechlin's Superman, who'll make his debut on the network in the opening episodes of Supergirl season 2. Here's what he said, which explains that the classic screen Supermen George Reeves and Christopher Reeve will be influencing Hoechlin's portrayal...

"I think our take on him is probably something a little bit more traditional. There’s certainly a little bit of the 'Aw shucks' about him, but he’s been Superman for awhile, so there’s a savviness about him as Superman and as Clark. If he’s been Superman for 12 years, that also means that he’s been Clark Kent for 12 years. He knows how to interview somebody. He knows how to get a story out of someone. »

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Christopher Reeve's Son Announces Creation of Accessible Toys: 'Everyone Deserves the Chance to Play'

2 May 2016 3:30 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Growing up, Christopher Reeve's son, Will, would have "loved to race cars or toss a ball with my dad, but the technology didn't exist." "Now, thankfully, it does," the 23-year-old son of the late actor and former Superman star tells People, announcing the creation of Adaptoys, which are adapted versions of popular toys that will give people living with paralysis the chance to play with their families. (Reeve was paralyzed in 1995 after being thrown from a horse, and spent his life afterward working on behalf of people with spinal cord injuries.) The Adaptoys prototypes - a race car that runs on sip-and-puff technology, »

- Sharon Cotliar

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Actors who Almost Played Famous Roles

30 April 2016 4:14 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Did you ever see an actor/actress in a famous role and then hear later that they were not the first, or even the second choice to play the iconic part? Many of the legendary movie characters began as a vehicle for a different star than the one who we know-and-love in the part. Here are a few of the greatest examples of famous "Almosts'.

 Christopher Walken As Han Solo: George Lucas had a very hard time finding his Han Solo in Star Wars: A New Hope (1977). This character was the last of the lead figures to be cast. Lucas’ leading contender at one point was none other than Christopher Walken. Just think about the possibilities in that performance! However, a chance meeting with Harrison Ford (Who was working as a carpenter at the time) inspired Lucas to cast Ford in the part instead, which launched him into super stardom in the 80s. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Captain America: Civil War shows why superheroes shouldn’t team up

25 April 2016 2:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Superman and Batman can only seem to summon their superpowers en masse. But I’ll take a Bourne or Bond over a pack of superheroes any day

Superheroes used to be loners. They were isolated by the exclusivity of their superpowers, the singularity of their origins, the particularity of their neuroses and the eccentricity of their garb.

The very earliest of the big-screen superheroes, Captain Marvel (1941) and Batman (1943), were marked out by their apartness. When the genre really took off, in1978, it found Christopher Reeve’s Superman grappling with his solitude. If Michael Keaton’s Batman (1989) was hardly companionable, Christian Bale’s was even less so. Through the 1990s and the 2000s, most of their burgeoning array of peers managed to cut the mustard by themselves.

Continue reading »

- David Cox

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Captain America: Civil War shows why superheroes shouldn’t team up

25 April 2016 2:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Superman and Batman can only seem to summon their superpowers en masse. But I’ll take a Bourne or Bond over a pack of superheroes any day

Superheroes used to be loners. They were isolated by the exclusivity of their superpowers, the singularity of their origins, the particularity of their neuroses and the eccentricity of their garb.

The very earliest of the big-screen superheroes, Captain Marvel (1941) and Batman (1943), were marked out by their apartness. When the genre really took off, in1978, it found Christopher Reeve’s Superman grappling with his solitude. If Michael Keaton’s Batman (1989) was hardly companionable, Christian Bale’s was even less so. Through the 1990s and the 2000s, most of their burgeoning array of peers managed to cut the mustard by themselves.

Continue reading »

- David Cox

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The Captain America Movie You Haven’t Seen (And Probably Don’t Want To)

24 April 2016 4:45 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week Neil Calloway looks at a forgotten Marvel comic book film from 1990…

With the release next week of Captain America: Civil War, it’s time to look back when Marvel Films weren’t blockbuster event movies with bottomless budgets and huge all star casts.

The 1990s were an odd time for superhero movies; the Batman films were doing well at the box office, and there were several attempts to get Superman back off the ground, but most of the films were substandard versions of relatively unknown superheroes. One exception to that rule – or at least to the unknown superheroes part of it – was 1990’s Captain America film.

Before the McU came into being, the film rights for Marvel characters were owned by different production companies. Cannon Films – who produced the last of the Superman films starring Christopher Reeve – had snapped up the rights to Captain America. When founder Menahem Golan left Cannon, »

- Neil Calloway

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A Town Called Vulcan: Star Trek Haven of the North

19 April 2016 10:48 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Stardate, 2016. We start off for… hold up. I have a confession. I am not a Trekkie. I owe no allegiance to the myriad TV iterations, although I am fond of the original mid-’60s series and their subsequent big screen adventures (except for The Final Frontier—I am reasonably lucid). However, this particular voyage is co-captained by my wife, Michelle, who has a deep fondness for the original gang and their follow-up crew of The Next Generation (which I don’t like, and yet she still married me). She can identify scenes by hearing orchestral movements from the series and the films. In short, she is a Trekkie (and yes, I asked her permission to call her that—I’m not insane).

Okay, let’s try this again. My wife and I leave the big city of Calgary, Alberta behind for a day trip to visit the Trekcetera Museum, located »

- Scott Drebit

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

21-40 of 84 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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