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Charlotte Rampling Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (2) | Trivia (32) | Personal Quotes (23)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 5 February 1946Sturmer, Essex, England, UK
Birth NameCharlotte Tessa Rampling
Nickname The Legend
Height 5' 6½" (1.69 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Tessa Charlotte Rampling was born 5 February 1946 in Sturmer, England, to Isabel Anne (Gurteen), a painter, and Godfrey Lionel Rampling, an Olympic gold medalist, army officer, and colonel, who became a NATO commander. She was educated at Jeanne d'Arc Académie pour Jeunes Filles in Versailles, France and at the exclusive St. Hilda's school in Bushey, England. She was a model before entering films in Richard Lester's The Knack... and How to Get It (1965), followed by roles in Georgy Girl (1966) and Luchino Visconti's The Damned (1969). Rampling is best known for her role in Liliana Cavani's The Night Porter (1974), where she played a concentration camp survivor who is reunited with the Nazi guard (Dirk Bogarde) who tortured her throughout her captivity. In 1974, she co-starred with Sean Connery in John Boorman's science fiction adventure Zardoz (1974), with Robert Mitchum in Farewell, My Lovely (1975), with Woody Allen in his Stardust Memories (1980), and with Paul Newman in Sidney Lumet's The Verdict (1982). An actress always willing to take on bold and meaningful roles, Rampling had perhaps the most off-beat one in Nagisa Ôshima's 1986 comedy Max mon amour (1986) as Margaret, a woman in love with a chimpanzee. She has also voiced video games, such as The Ring.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anonymous

Spouse (2)

Jean-Michel Jarre (8 October 1976 - 1996) (divorced) (1 child)
Bryan Southcombe (1972 - 1976) (divorced) (1 child)

Trivia (32)

Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#97).
She was awarded the O.B.E. (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in the 2000 Queen's Millennium Honours List for her services to acting and United Kingdom-French cultural relations.
Festival tribute at the Créteil International Women's Film Festival, France.
Mother of television director Barnaby Southcombe with Bryan Southcombe and of magician David Jarre (b. 1977) with Jean-Michel Jarre. Stepmother of Emily Jarre.
The British rock band Kinky Machine wrote a song about her, simply called "Charlotte Rampling." It includes the line "I always wanted to be your trampoline".
Was included as one of People Magazines 50 Most Beautiful People in May 2001.
Winner of a Honorary Cesar from the French Academy of Cinema in recognition of her work (2001).
Has a house in Paris and another in Chelsea.
The character she played in François Ozon's Swimming Pool (2003), "Sarah Morton", was named after her elder sister, Sarah, who committed suicide at age 23. She told The Guardian, "I thought that after such a very long time of not letting her be with me that I would like to bring her back into my life".
Studied at Jeanne d'Arc Académie Pour Jeunes Filles at Versailles, France when her family moved there.
Invited to join AMPAS in 2005.
Member of jury at the Cannes Film Festival in 1976.
In the Extras section of the 2-disc-set Miramax release of The Beatles' A Hard Day's Night (1964), actor Jeremy Lloyd, who makes an uncredited appearance in the film's dance scene, claims that Rampling, his then-girlfriend, is also present in the dance scene.
Head of jury at the 2006 Berlin International Film Festival.
Her father Godfrey won silver in the 4x400m relay at the 1932 Olympics, and gold in the 4x400m relay at the 1936 Olympics. He died on 20 June 2009 at age 100.
Member of the jury at the Venice Film Festival in 1997.
After attending Jeanne d'Arc Academie pour Jeunes Filles in Versailles, France and St. Hilda's School in Bushey, England, she worked as a model, but shortly after decided to study acting at The Royal Court in London.
Daughter of Anne Isabelle Rampling and Godfrey Lionel Rampling.
Has a son with Bryan Southcombe named Barnaby Southcombe, born on September 1972.
Has been engaged to Jean-Noel Tassez, a French business consultant since 1998.
Her sister Sarah shot herself in Argentina after giving birth prematurely (1966).
Became a Dame of France's Legion d'Honneur in 2002.
Has supported Nicolas Sarkozy's 2007 presidential campaign.
Speaks French fluently and often stars in French films.
Member of the jury at the I've Seen Films International Film Festival, founded by Rutger Hauer. [October 2011]
The character of The Boss in Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (2004) was modeled after her.
Gave birth to her 1st child at age 26, a son Barnaby Southcombe in September 1972. Child's father is her 1st ex-husband, Bryan Southcombe.
Gave birth to her 2nd child at age 31, a son David Jarre on March 23, 1977. Child's father is her 2nd ex-husband, Jean-Michel Jarre.
She was considered for the role of Sarah Woodruff in The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981) by the time director Fred Zinnemann was attached to the project, but writer John Fowles- having been unimpressed with her acting in The Night Porter (1974)- didn't agree upon her casting. The movie was eventually directed by Karel Reisz and starred Meryl Streep.
She and Juliette Binoche are the only winners of 2 EFAs (European Film Awards) for Best Actress.
Director Tim Burstall met her for the title role in The Rollicking Adventures of Eliza Fraser (1976), but eventually felt she wasn't a comedy actress. Susannah York was cast instead.
Shared the cover of Vanity Fair magazine's 2016 Hollywood issue with, Jane Fonda, Viola Davis, Cate Blanchett, Jennifer Lawrence, Rachel Weisz, Lupita Nyong'o, Brie Larson, Alicia Vikander, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Helen Mirren, Diane Keaton and Saoirse Ronan. Photographed by Annie Leibovitz.

Personal Quotes (23)

[on her tendency to play villainous roles] I'd rather be thought of like that than to play Mary Poppins.
Difficult acting with a chimp? No, no. The emotions were the same. In a way it was like playing opposite Paul Newman. The chimpanzee reacted differently, that's all.
Oh, directors want me to be really stern sometimes. They like that quality in a woman. They find it compelling.
I didn't allow myself to have fun for a very long time, for all sorts of reasons. What's happened now is that I've lived through that, and I've come to a point where I can say that. I can feel happy too!
I'm just amazed. I'm glad to be alive, because I know what it's like not to want to be here, and glad that young directors want to put me in fantastic films. So say no more.
I had fun before, but if you can have fun the way I have when I'm nearly 60, that's quite interesting. If you don't worry about getting wrinkled and all that, and you just allow yourself to feel good, then maybe it's because your time has come.
I think you have to earn beauty. You can use it or abuse it however you want when you're young. It's a God-given gift. You have a visiting card - you can go into any room and someone will come and talk to you. But I've always thought from very early on that you have to be careful with that - not being vain or narcissistic. Have fun, but don't be obsessed with it.
There's an awful lot of pressure around the idea of a woman growing older and therefore losing that potential of being desirable, and that puts women into a situation where they feel almost embarrassed about the fact they don't have the kind of bodies that young women have, or they don't have the kind of sexual attraction that seems to go with a younger stage of their life. What does that mean, the fact that you're older? It means that you're not going to have the same kind of relationships you had when you were younger. I think we have to reinvent from a woman's point of view another way of being.
I generally don't make films to entertain people. I choose the parts that challenge me to break through my own barriers. A need to devour, punish, humiliate, or surrender seems to be a primal part of human nature, and it's certainly a big part of sex. To discover what normal means, you have to surf a tide of weirdness.
There are now different subjects coming up for us older women that certainly didn't before. Of course, sexuality and sensuality have always been forms that film is obsessed with, but it used to be a form for younger women because, well, they were much prettier, but now directors and audiences are using it to explore older women - it may not be quite so pretty but my God that won't stop me from investigating it.
[on posing nude with the Mona Lisa in the Louvre] It was such a powerful idea, a once-in-a-lifetime trip. It was really a magical experience, and there was something wildly audacious and naughty, too. You've got all these people looking at you from the extraordinary paintings, and it's a very spiritual feeling. You feel that you are part of hundreds of years of art.
[on living in France] I'm a legitimate foreigner. I'm an Englishwoman speaking French. They have no references for me, or my life, my childhood, my upbringing, my schooling. I'm exotic. They like that, and I like that.
He wanted to seduce all the pretty girls. That's for sure. As long as his wife wasn't there, I think he had a pretty good time with most of them. And that was Sean Connery.
When I take on something, I take the whole thing on. It's not even a question of separating, "Oh, am I going to be naked?" I go with my whole person.
I knew that was a world I couldn't survive in, that Hollywood world. I didn't consciously think about it, but I think I wanted to be a European.
I was brought up in the hard way. My parents were great, my dad was great, but we didn't talk about our feelings.
[on the kinds of roles she is attracted to] Films that come in quietly and actually do something to you. You could read them and think there's not much story there, but within that 'not much story', a hell of a lot actually goes on. The director wants to find out what goes on in between.
I like to wait and be invited to dance. I'm an old-fashioned girl.
[on Broadchurch (2013)] To act with David Tennant is the thing itself. You can't describe it. You just experience it.
[on Dexter (2006)] To come in at the very end of a series like that after so may seasons is like being a surprise relation arriving for the holidays. You feel welcome yet strange at the same time.
[on Stardust Memories (1980)] I thought I had retired from moviemaking and was just going to be a housewife, then [Woody Allen] sent me that script. Game over.
[on The Night Porter (1974)] With Dirk Bogarde beside me, I felt I could do anything. He would give you that cosy but creepy smile and you thought all was well.
[on The Damned (1969)] I just kept putting one foot in front of the other and doing what I was told. I knew it was very strange, but I didn't mind.

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