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1-20 of 74 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Marshall’ to ‘Black Panther’: Chadwick Boseman Is Redefining Black Icons as Lawmakers

8 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the opening frames of the “Marshall” trailer, the future U.S. Supreme Court justice gets a setup worthy of a superhero: In the trailer’s opening frames, 32-year old NAACP lawyer Thurgood Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) sips whiskey at a bar; a group of threatening racists gather around him. “You gentlemen are making a mistake,” says Marshall, in the tone of a calm badass as he steadies himself for the inevitable physical confrontation.

Boseman said a cocksure portrayal is the only logical interpretation. “His job was to be the lone attorney running around for the NAACP, dealing with cases in towns where there was racial prejudice and there was inequality,” he said. “Who has the arrogance to walk into those places and actually believe that they either will win, or they can set up the case in such a way that it can go to a higher level, and then you can win on that level, »

- Chris O'Falt

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Mirren to receive Chaplin Award by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-10-15 07:06:51

14 October 2017 11:06 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Helen Mirren will receive Chaplin Award Photo: Giles Keyte British actress Helen Mirren is to be honoured at the 45th Chaplin Award Gala next April. The star, who won an Oscar for her performance in The Queen, will receive the annual honour from the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York.

The 72-year-old, who received a BAFTA fellowship in 2014, joins previous winners of the award, including Robert De Niro, Bette Davis and Sidney Poitier, which was inaugurated in 1972, when Charlie Chaplin returned to the Us from exile to accept the commendation.

The society's board chairman Ann Tenenbaum said: “It is an honour and a pleasure for us to present Helen Mirren with our 45th Chaplin Award. From housemaid to Queen and everything in between, Ms. Mirren has delivered masterful performances of complex characters, upending stereotype after stereotype along the way.”

Executive director Lesli Klainberg added: “Ever since her debut »

- Amber Wilkinson

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Harvey Weinstein Produced One of My Favorite Movies. Now What? (Column)

13 October 2017 8:54 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

One of my favorite films is 2002’s “The Hours.” It is a melodramatic film in some ways, and hugely depressing, too. But at the age of 17 it was absolutely lyrical for me, and that sensibility has not faded for me in the nearly two decades since. But “The Hours” was crucial for other reasons, too. It’s not just a film I loved at a young age; it’s a film that prompted my entrée to critical thinking and awards-season reporting, as I tracked the movie’s progress from one dusty theater in my 24-screen multiplex to the Academy Awards. I was 17 years old when I first read the name Harvey Weinstein in the pages of my religiously perused Entertainment Weekly. I did not realize then, as I know now, that Weinstein was involved in four out of the five nominated Best Picture movies that awards season — “Gangs of New York,” his personal favorite, »

- Sonia Saraiya

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Harry Gittes, Producer and Longtime Friend of Jack Nicholson, Dies at 81

13 September 2017 2:26 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Harry Gittes, who produced multiple movies starring Jack Nicholson, died of natural causes on Sept. 2. He was 81.

Gittes attended the University of Massachusetts at Amherst before starting his career as an advertising copywriter and photographer in New York. In the ’60s, he began shooting album covers for the likes of Woody Allen and Cass Elliot at the Bitter End, New York’s oldest rock club. Gittes also photographed then-up-and-comers including Nicholson, Elliott Gould, and Liza Minnelli.

Related

Celebrities Who Died in 2017

He became friends with producer Roy Silver, who eventually sparked Gittes’ future as a film producer. Together, they produced the 1969 pilot of the animated special “Hey, Hey, Hey, It’s Fat Albert.”

Gittes also cultivated a friendship with Nicholson, and produced several projects with the actor-director, including “Goin’ South,” “Drive, He Said,” and “About Schmidt.” Nicholson’s character in 1974 classic “Chinatown,” private investigator J.J. Gittes, was named after the producer.

Gittes »

- Rebecca Rubin

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Harry Gittes, Jack Nicholson's Pal and Producer, Dies at 81

5 September 2017 1:56 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Harry Gittes, who produced the Jack Nicholson films Drive, He Said; Goin' South and About Schmidt and was the namesake for the actor's gumshoe character in Chinatown, has died. He was 81.

Gittes died Saturday of natural causes in Los Angeles, publicist Seth Horowitz reported.

Gittes also produced Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976), starring James Caan, Elliott Gould, Michael Caine and Diane Keaton; Richard Benjamin's Little Nikita (1988), starring Sidney Poitier and River Phoenix; Breaking In (1989), written by John Sayles and starring Burt Reynolds; and The Girl Next Door (2004), starring Emile Hirsch.

Born on May 6, 1936, in »

- Mike Barnes

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Harry Gittes, Jack Nicholson's Pal and Producer, Dies at 81

5 September 2017 1:56 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Harry Gittes, who produced the Jack Nicholson films Drive, He Said; Goin' South and About Schmidt and was the namesake for the actor's gumshoe character in Chinatown, has died. He was 81.

Gittes died Saturday of natural causes in Los Angeles, publicist Seth Horowitz reported.

Gittes also produced Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976), starring James Caan, Elliott Gould, Michael Caine and Diane Keaton; Richard Benjamin's Little Nikita (1988), starring Sidney Poitier and River Phoenix; Breaking In (1989), written by John Sayles and starring Burt Reynolds; and The Girl Next Door (2004), starring Emile Hirsch.

Born on May 6, 1936, in »

- Mike Barnes

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17 Films By and About Women to Check Out at Tiff 2017

5 September 2017 9:12 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Unicorn Store

The 42nd edition of the Toronto International Film Festival will kick off in just two days, and as always, there is an overwhelming amount of amazing-sounding films screening at the fest. We’ve collected some of the titles by and about women that have us most excited. This list is by no means exhaustive — there are plenty of other films written, directed, and about women in the program. These are just some of the highlights, which include directorial debuts, Oscar hopefuls, and more.

Tiff runs from September 7–17. Be sure to check out our interviews with women directors screening films at the fest, which will start rolling out today.

All summaries and images courtesy of Tiff.

Lady Bird” — Written and Directed by Greta Gerwig

What it’s about: A rebellious young woman (Saoirse Ronan) navigates the pressures and constraints of Catholic school and life in Sacramento.

Why we’re interested: Loosely based on writer-director Greta Gerwig’s own experiences, “Lady Bird” marks her solo directorial debut. She previously co-helmed “Nights and Weekends.” We’ve been fans of Gerwig’s writing in oddball comedies “Mistress America” and “Frances Ha” and it’s great to see her penning another female-led story, this time starring Saoirse Ronan, one of the most exciting actors of her generation. In a soon-to-be published interview with us, Gerwig said that the worst advice she received was “Women don’t really have the right personality traits to be directors.” We’re glad she didn’t listen.

“Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami” (Documentary) — Directed by Sophie Fiennes

What it’s about: Filmed over the course of a decade, the new documentary from director Sophie Fiennes (“The Pervert’s Guide to Ideology”) offers a stylish and unconventional look at the Jamaican-born model, singer, and New Wave icon.

Why we’re interested: “‘Grace Jones’ exists almost as a cultural construction — a visual fetish,” director Sophie Fiennes told us in a soon-to-be-published interview. “The film was a unique opportunity to explore the person beyond that fascinating surface.” Like another Tiff film, “Gaga: Five Foot Two,” “Grace Jones” looks like it will push past the public figure everyone thinks they know to present a real-life woman who is just as compelling as her persona.

Kings” — Written and Directed by Deniz Gamze Ergüven

What it’s about: A recluse (Daniel Craig) helps a woman (Halle Berry) and her multiple children when riots erupt in Los Angeles following the 1992 acquittal of the policemen charged with assaulting Rodney King.

Why we’re interested: Like so many others, we were bowled over by “Mustang,” Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s Oscar-nominated debut about oppressed sisters living in a small village in Turkey. “Kings” marks her first project in English, and is set during an important chapter in history that hasn’t received nearly enough attention. We’re also looking forward to seeing Halle Berry in a meaty dramatic role. The Oscar-winning actress has revealed that she herself hopes to start directing and also to produce more projects. “I want to start being a part of making more opportunities for people of color,” she said. “We have to start telling stories that include us and if stories don’t include us, we have to start asking, ‘Why can’t that be a person of color? Why can’t that white male character be a black woman? Why can’t it?’ We have to start pushing the envelope and asking these questions.”

Unicorn Store ”— Directed by Brie Larson; Written by Samantha McIntyre

What it’s about: Brie Larson stars in her directorial debut about a dreamer reluctant to abandon her childish wonder who is offered the most magical gift she can imagine.

Why we’re interested: A feel-good movie about an unconventional young woman who follows her dreams is just what the doctor ordered in these troubled times. When we asked star and director Brie Larson what drew her to the project in a soon-to-be-published interview, the Oscar winner said, “For me, the idea of going after this unicorn was dreaming the impossible dream. The fact that I wanted to be an actor for so long and was told ‘no’ so many times kind of made me feel a little crazy; I was like a person going after a unicorn. There were all these people scratching their heads and going, ‘Why are you doing this? This is obviously never going to work out,’” she recalled. “So, this is, in some ways, an homage to my life and my journey and hopefully a way to inspire others to keep going on their path, whatever their unicorn is.” The “Room” actress added, “It’s not an easy time in the world right now, so I hope that, in the spirit of film’s traditional escapism and a way to dream, this film can do that.”

“I, Tonya”

What it’s about: Margot Robbie stars as controversial Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding in this alternately tragic, hilarious, and absurd look at one of the biggest scandals in U.S. sports history.

Why we’re interested: “I, Tonya” focuses on Tonya Harding and her ex-husband Jeff Gillooly’s attack on figure skater Nancy Kerrigan in 1994. The buzzy script for the film landed on 2016’s Black List. We’re hopeful that the movie doesn’t just play the story for laughs. When the iconic pop culture moment is rehashed, most overlook Harding’s allegations of her ex-husband’s abuse. Harding has claimed that the attack was his idea, and she didn’t report his plan to the police because she was worried he’d try to kill her if she tried. We’re looking forward to seeing Robbie in a role unlike any we’ve seen her in. The “Suicide Squad” star is also producing the project.

Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts ”— Co-Written and Directed by Mouly Surya

What it’s about: A young widow violently turns the tables on her would-be attackers, in this powerful, provocative, and visually stunning Indonesian take on the “feminist western” genre.

Why we’re interested: Director Mouly Surya calls “Marlina” “a celebration of women power” — a far cry from the usual female revenge fantasy, which usually includes a woman becoming completely unhinged with rage and a thirst for blood. According to Surya, Marlina is a woman “on her way to redemption.” That’s a fresh perspective for a genre that’s usually plagued with vigilantes, victims, and little else.

Dark River ”— Written and Directed by Clio Barnard

What it’s about: Ruth Wilson stars in British filmmaker Clio Barnard’s atmospheric and layered drama about the old wounds and bitter new grievances that come to light when a woman returns home to settle the tenancy of her family’s Yorkshire farm.

Why we’re interested: Sibling drama, old grudges, and gendered societal expectations collide in “Dark River.” In a soon-to-be-published interview, Barnard told us that “it is a film about how damaging it is to be silenced and to bury the past, about how as children we can feel we failed to protect our siblings and can carry misplaced guilt with us for the rest of our lives. It is also about acceptance, putting the past to rest.”

“My Days of Mercy” — Directed by Tali Shalom-Ezer

What it’s about: The daughter (Ellen Page) of a man on death row falls in love with a woman (Kate Mara) on the opposing side of her family’s political cause.

Why we’re interested: Political arguments usually last a scene or two in film — and they hardly ever occur between two people in a romantic relationship. “My Days of Mercy” promises to be groundbreaking because it not only depicts two people with very different opinions falling in love, it depicts two women on opposite sides of an issue falling in love. Ellen Page’s Lucy has a father on death row and is vehemently against the death penalty, while Kate Mara’s Mercy supports capital punishment. “I wanted to explore the beautiful dynamic between Lucy and Mercy, which I believe is an expression of the transformative, healing power of love,” Tali Shalom-Ezer told us in an as-yet unpublished interview.

Disobedience” — Co-Written by Rebecca Lenkiewicz

What it’s about: Sebastián Lelio (“A Fantastic Woman,” “Gloria”) directs Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams in this adaptation of Naomi Alderman’s novel about a woman who returns home to her orthodox Jewish community in London and rekindles a romance with her cousin’s wife.

Why we’re interested: Lelio received raves for “Gloria,” his 2013 film about a vibrant older woman looking for passion and love. It appears that he’s helmed another story about an unconventional female protagonist with “Disobedience.” Even before Ronit (Rachel Weisz) embarks on an affair with her cousin’s wife (Rachel McAdams), she is considered a rebel; she lives a secular life far away from her devout family. “Disobedience” promises to be a nuanced take on women, faith, family, and living life on your own terms.

“The Seen and Unseen ”— Written and Directed by Kamila Andini

What it’s about: A 10-year-old girl retreats to a fantastical, evocative dream space to deal with the impending loss of her twin brother in this imaginative film from Indonesian director Kamila Andini.

Why we’re interested: “The Seen and Unseen” depicts a holistic culture and — unlike most other movies that do so — doesn’t present it through white, privileged characters. Instead, the film uses the philosophy of Sekala Niskala as a way to examine family, connection, and grief. “Bali is a place where holism is still strongly felt in daily life,” director Kamila Andini explained to Women and Hollywood in an as-yet unpublished interview. “The Seen and Unseen — or Sekala Niskala — is the philosophy they believe in life; life is in harmony with all the seen things, and the unseen as well.”

Woman Walks Ahead” — Directed by Susanna White

What it’s about: Jessica Chastain stars in the true story of Catherine Weldon, a 19th-century Brooklyn artist who travelled to the Dakota Territory and became the confidante of legendary Sioux chief Sitting Bull.

Why we’re interested: Jessica Chastain consistently delivers amazing performances, and it seems like “Woman Walks Ahead” handles its subject matter with respect and self-awareness. “In making this movie I was very conscious, of being, like Wheldon, an outsider. While I could relate to being a woman in late 19th century New York, I knew I had a huge amount to learn about Native American culture,” director Susanna White explained in an upcoming interview with us. “I asked for help from the community and had an amazing experience.” “Woman Walks Ahead” has a white protagonist but it doesn’t seem like it’ll present yet another white savior narrative. It’s based on a true story and White revealed she was “very moved when [the project’s] Lakota language adviser, Ben Blackbear, watched the movie and said he hoped it would change the way history was taught in schools because it was telling a story his community usually didn’t get told.”

“Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart” (Documentary) — Directed by Tracy Heather Strain

What it’s about: Filmmaker Tracy Heather Strain delivers a moving account of the life of Black playwright, communist, feminist, lesbian, and outspoken trailblazer Lorraine Hansberry (“A Raisin in the Sun”).

Why we’re interested: Tony winner Anika Noni Rose provides the voice for Lorraine Hansberry’s writing in this documentary. The film also features interviews with Ruby Dee, Sidney Poitier, and Louis Gossett Jr., all of whom acted in versions of Hansberry’s most famous work, the segregated Chicago-set play “A Raisin in the Sun.” While “Raisin” is a classic of literature and theater — and movingly portrays the struggles of a black family in the pre-Civil Rights era — it is far from the writer’s only accomplishment. “Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart” shines a much-needed spotlight on Hansberry’s entire story and legacy.

I Am Not a Witch ”— Written and Directed by Rungano Nyoni

What it’s about: Part magic realist fable and part gendered social critique, Rungano Nyoni’s debut feature focuses on a young girl who is banished from her village in Zambia and sent to a camp for exiled witches.

Why we’re interested: It’s rare to see a feature center on a young girl, and this fascinating project is not entirely a work of fiction. “These witch accusations are actually illegal in most parts of Africa, but it still continues. The practice of witchcraft is also illegal but it still continues,” writer-director Rungano Nyoni told us in an interview. “Sometimes people get very precious about it, they’re like, ‘You’re laughing at these witch accusations and that’s cultural tradition.’ We said, ‘No it’s not.’ You have to call it out for what it is, because it’s mostly aimed at women, and it always has been throughout history so we can’t wrap it in cotton wool. It’s misogyny — that’s all it is. I don’t know how else to express it. We have to embrace that truth before we can do something about it.”

Mary Shelley” — Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour; Written by Emma Jensen

What it’s about: Elle Fanning stars in this scintillating biopic of the “Frankenstein” author, chronicling her tempestuous marriage to dissolute poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and the fateful night at a Swiss chateau that inspired her most famous creation.

Why we’re interested: Haifaa Al-Mansour is following up her critically acclaimed debut narrative “Wadjda” with another female-led story, this one starring the fabulous Elle Fanning. “When I read Mary Shelley’s story I felt an instant connection with it. She grew up in this very conservative culture, where women’s roles were much more rigid and opportunities were extremely limited. But she rose above it, and wrote a story that continues to capture the imagination of readers to this day,” Al-Mansour explained in an upcoming interview with us. “What I love is that she chose to write a book that was so outside of the ‘acceptable’ realms of literature for women, and created a genre — science fiction — that continues to be dominated by male voices. She wrote a book that challenged religious doctrine and raised new ethical questions about the impact uninhibited scientific experimentation would have on a society.” Shelley’s trailblazing story is important, and we’re even happier to bear witness to it since it’s Al-Mansour and Fanning bringing it to the big screen.

Ava” — Written and Directed by Sadaf Foroughi

What it’s about: A 16-year-old girl’s relationship with her family is challenged after her mother takes her to a gynecologist in order to ensure she’s still a virgin.

Why we’re interested: Young women’s sexuality is still very much a taboo subject around the world. It definitely is in the world of “Ava,” in which the titular Iranian girl is forced by her mother to undergo a physical examination to confirm that she hasn’t had sex. After Ava’s is subjected to the invasion of privacy, she begins to see the hypocrisy and misogyny everywhere. This is the beginning of her feminist awakening.

The Children Act

What it’s about: Emma Thompson and Stanley Tucci star in this adaptation of the novel by Ian McEwan, about a high-court judge (Thompson) who finds personal and professional crises colliding when she is asked to rule in the case of a brilliant 18-year-old boy who is refusing the blood transfusion that would save his life.

Why we’re interested: Last seen as Mrs. Potts in the live-action “Beauty and the Beast,” it’s been awhile since Emma Thompson has had a starring vehicle. In a story reminiscent of real-life medical ethics cases, “Children Act” sees Thompson playing Fiona Maye, a judge coping with a troubled marriage and guilt over a past verdict when the new case is put on her desk. A successful, intelligent woman who’s conflicted and overwhelmed, but determined to do her job and do it well? We can’t think of a better character to showcase Thompson’s talents.

“Number One” — Directed by Tonie Marshall; Co-Written by Tonie Marshall and Marion Doussot

What it’s about: In this whip-smart drama about corporate sexism, top French star Emmanuelle Devos plays a high-ranking female executive who is forced to consider her options and marshal her forces when she realizes that the glass ceiling is fast approaching.

Why we’re interested: Like Meera Menon’s “Equity,” “Number One” explores a corporate culture from a female perspective — and shows how the professional world isn’t always a welcoming place for a woman, no matter how capable she is at her job.

17 Films By and About Women to Check Out at Tiff 2017 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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Larry Sherman, New York Actor and Onetime Donald Trump Publicist, Dies at 94

30 August 2017 9:31 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Character actor Larry Sherman, who also served as publicist for Donald Trump in the 1980s, died Aug. 26 in New York of natural causes. He was 94.

Sherman received degrees in theater and journalism from the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, kicking around Manhattan with some stage roles and bit parts before segueing into a successful career as a sports journalist. He covered the 1962 Rome Olympics, and wrote for The Herald Tribune and Newsday before landing at the Long Island Press, where he worked for 25 years.

When the newspaper folded in 1977, Sherman moved to Los Angeles to take a job as head writer for the game show “The Joker’s Wild.” When that program went dark, he moved back to New York looking for work. “He began calling on his friends, and it was a guy at the New York Times, I think, who said ‘I hear this guy Trump is looking for a guy to do »

- Paula Parisi

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Larry Sherman, New York Actor and Onetime Donald Trump Publicist, Dies at 94

30 August 2017 9:31 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Character actor Larry Sherman, who also served as publicist for Donald Trump in the 1980s, died Aug. 26 in New York of natural causes. He was 94.

Sherman received degrees in theater and journalism from the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, kicking around Manhattan with some stage roles and bit parts before segueing into a successful career as a sports journalist. He covered the 1962 Rome Olympics, and wrote for The Herald Tribune and Newsday before landing at the Long Island Press, where he worked for 25 years.

When the newspaper folded in 1977, Sherman moved to Los Angeles to take a job as head writer for the game show “The Joker’s Wild.” When that program went dark, he moved back to New York looking for work. “He began calling on his friends, and it was a guy at the New York Times, I think, who said ‘I hear this guy Trump is looking for a guy to do »

- Paula Parisi

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As America Reels from Charlottesville, ‘Lemon’ Finds Comedy in Unmasking Racism

17 August 2017 1:34 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The footage of white supremacists and neo-Nazis marching through Charlottesville is horrific, although there’s comic value in the absurdity of racist lunatics trooping to home improvement centers so they could wield tiki torches. Still, for late-night talk show hosts and other comedians, the prospects of mining humor from this peacock display of American bigotry was a strict no-fly zone.

Enter “Lemon.” When it premiered at Sundance in January, writer-director Janicza Bravo’s unnerving first feature was a fascinating deconstruction of white male privilege and racist ideology; in the shadow of Charlottesville, her satire echoes the headlines as it arrives in theaters and VOD on August 18.

Read More:‘Whose Streets?’: For the Charlottesville Resistance, this Documentary is Essential Cinema

In the movie, Bravo (a black woman born in Panama and raised in the U.S.) directs her husband, comedian Brett Gelman, who’s white. Gelman plays Isaac, a disgruntled and alienated playwright. »

- Eric Kohn

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1963 Convo Pt 2: Lilies of the Field

15 August 2017 3:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Previously, in this '63 Party:

The Supporting Actress Smackdown 

Podcast Conversation Part 1

To close out our little Oscar 1963 celebration, Nathaniel talks Lilies of the Field and more with this month's panel: Teo Bugbee, Keiran Scarlett, Séan McGovern, and Brian Mullin

Smackdown '63 Companion Podcast Part 2

(42 minutes)

In which we wrap up our discussion of big budget airport trifle The VIPs. Then the panel has differing opinions on the merits of the classic feelgood Lilies of the Field. Also up for discussion: Sidney Poitier's unique spot in Hollywood history, Denzel Washington comparisons, and an aside to Alfred Hitchcock and The Birds. And, as we say our goodbyes, we each offer up one must-see film from 1963 that we hope you'll watch.

You can listen to the podcast here at the bottom of the post or download from iTunes. Continue the conversations in the comments, won't you?  »

- NATHANIEL R

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Meet the Panelists - Smackdown '63

11 August 2017 2:15 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The Supporting Actress Smackdown of '63 is just 3 days away. So it's time to get your votes in on the nominees that year. Readers, collectively, are the final panelist, so grade the nominees (only the ones you've seen) from 1 to 5 hearts. Your votes count toward the smackdown win! 

Diane Cilento Tom Jones Edith Evans Tom Jones Joyce Redman Tom Jones

Margaret Rutherford The VIPs 

Lilia Skala Lilies of the Field 

Now that we're finally getting to this long delayed Smackdown. It's time to meet this month's talking heads...

The Panel

Seán McGovern and Brian Mullin

An Irishman and an American based in London, Seán McGovern and Brian Mullin are the hosts of Broad Appeal, the podcast that looks back at female-driven films from the not-so-distant past. Seán is a film festival programmer with Fringe! Queer Film & Arts Fest and has also worked for the BFI and the National Film and Television School. »

- NATHANIEL R

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Bored with blockbusters? Why Hollywood needs another Bonnie and Clyde moment

10 August 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This weekend marks 50 years since the release of the film that shook up studios and ushered in a new wave of auteurs including Coppola and Scorsese. Does the complacent Hollywood of 2017 need a similar shock?

We will never know the contents of Warren Beatty’s head once it became clear he had cued Faye Dunaway into wrongly naming La La Land this year’s best picture at the Oscars. Rooted centre stage, the cast and crew of the real winner, Moonlight, filing by, he wore the horrified blank stare of the veteran actor suddenly unable to remember his line. Or perhaps he found himself a happy place – lost in thoughts of Bonnie and Clyde, the transformative crime movie whose 50th anniversary was the reason he and Dunaway were there anyway.

In truth, that was a bit of Academy flimflam. Released in August 1967, Bonnie and Clyde didn’t win the Oscar for Best Picture, »

- Danny Leigh

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Introducing: The Supporting Actresses of 1963

8 August 2017 7:15 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Don't freak out but the Smackdown returns in exactly one week after endless delays (if you'd like to vote, details are at the bottom of the post). This time we're looking at 1963 but before we introduce our panel, or start tinkering around with '63 hijinx, let's look at how 2 of the 5 nominated characters are introduced in their films. 

First up... a stone-faced nun eyeing Sidney Poitier's muscles »

- NATHANIEL R

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Reviews: Sidney Poitier In "They Call Me Mister Tibbs!" (1970) And "The Organization" (1971); Kino Lorber Blu-ray Releases

6 August 2017 6:14 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

The year 1967 marked the high point of Sidney Poitier's screen career. He starred in three highly acclaimed box office hits: "To Sir, With Love", "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and "In the Heat of the Night".  The fact that Poitier did not score a Best Actor Oscar nomination that year had less to do with societal prejudices (he had already won an Oscar) than the fact that he was competing with himself and split the voter's choices for his best performance. "In the Heat of the Night" did win the Best Picture Oscar and immortalized Poitier's performance as Virgil Tibbs, a Philadelphia detective who finds himself assigned to assist a redneck sheriff (Rod Steiger, who did win the Oscar that year for his performance in this film) in a town in the deep south that has experienced a grisly unsolved murder. When Steiger's character, resentful for »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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'In the Heat of the Night': THR's 1967 Review

1 August 2017 4:25 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

On August 2, 1967, In the Heat of the Night, starring Sidney Poitier, opened in theaters in New York. The film would go on to win five Oscars at the 40th Academy Awards, including best picture. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below: 

In the Heat of the Night, a Norman Jewison-Walter Mirisch production for Mirisch Corp., for United Artists release, is a gripping and suspenseful murder mystery that effects a feeling of greater importance by its veneer of social significance and the illusion of depth in its use of racial color.

The greatest significance lies in the breakthrough of the Negro »

- THR Staff

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The Best TV Shows Based on Movies, Ranked

1 August 2017 9:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In the age of branding and franchises, every existing story has added value. But not every film is fit for TV.

The challenge of adapting movies to a new medium is a tricky one with no clear-cut way to do it. Many new series credit “Fargo” as their benchmark, citing its tone and setting as inspiration for creating a new world around the best parts of what came before. That’s all well and good, but there are as many failed attempts to replicate Noah Hawley’s strategy as successes.

Similarly, some carbon copies — using the same characters and plot points as the preceding movie — are just as good, if not better than their cinematic predecessors. Because any way can work, many various attempts have been made. There’s no right way to do it, but there are a lot of wrong ways; as evidenced by the growing pile of canceled shows based on movies. »

- Ben Travers and Hanh Nguyen

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The Best TV Shows Based on Movies, Ranked

1 August 2017 9:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the age of branding and franchises, every existing story has added value. But not every film is fit for TV.

The challenge of adapting movies to a new medium is a tricky one with no clear-cut way to do it. Many new series credit “Fargo” as their benchmark, citing its tone and setting as inspiration for creating a new world around the best parts of what came before. That’s all well and good, but there are as many failed attempts to replicate Noah Hawley’s strategy as successes.

Similarly, some carbon copies — using the same characters and plot points as the preceding movie — are just as good, if not better than their cinematic predecessors. Because any way can work, many various attempts have been made. There’s no right way to do it, but there are a lot of wrong ways; as evidenced by the growing pile of canceled shows based on movies. »

- Ben Travers and Hanh Nguyen

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Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

21 July 2017 4:01 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca »

- Andre Soares

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What You Need to Know about “The Defiant Ones”

11 July 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

The Defiant Ones is an HBO docuseries exploring the astonishingly successful careers of Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine. The careers of the two men have interesting turns and twists and contain a touch of defiance that made them emerge from oblivion and past upheavals to become the outstanding figures we know today in entertainment. The documentary shares the name with a 1958 movie of the same title starring Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier in which the convicted duo escaped prison and had to overcome their racial bias of their own to survive. Just like its classic namesake, Defiant Ones tells

What You Need to Know about “The Defiant Ones” »

- Nat Berman

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