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Amanda Plummer Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (3) | Trivia (10) | Personal Quotes (8)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 23 March 1957New York City, New York, USA
Birth NameAmanda Michael Plummer
Height 5' 5" (1.65 m)

Mini Bio (3)

The daughter of Christopher Plummer and Tammy Grimes, Amanda Plummer was born in New York City on March 23, 1957. Her breakthrough role came when she starred opposite Robin Williams in The Fisher King (1991). However, Plummer may be best remembered for her work in the Quentin Tarantino classic Pulp Fiction (1994). Tarantino wrote the parts of two robbers who hold up a restaurant specifically for Plummer and her partner-in-screen-crime Tim Roth. Since that stand-out role, Plummer has continued to appear in a wide variety of films, including The Prophecy (1995), Freeway (1996), and My Life Without Me (2003).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Azure_Girl

Amanda Plummer last appeared as Alma in Tennessee Williams's "Summer and Smoke" with Kevin Anderson, directed by Michael Wilson. At the Stratford Theater in Ontario, she was Joan of Arc in an original adaptation of "The Lark" by Jean Anouilh, directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg. She appeared as Polly in "The Gnadiges Fraulein" with Elizabeth Ashley, and as Kyra in the world premiere of "One Exception", both by by Tennessee Williams, at the Hartford Stage.

On Broadway: "A Taste of Honey" as Jo (nominated for a Tony Award, and Drama Desk Award, and received the Outer Critics Circle, and Theatre World Awards); as Agnes in "Agnes of God" with Geraldine Page (Tony Award, Drama Desk Award, Outer Critics Circle, and Boston Critics Awards); as Eliza in "Pygmalion" with Peter O'Toole and John Mills (Tony Award nomination); as Laura in "The Glass Menagerie" with Jessica Tandy; as Dolly in "You Never Can Tell" by George Bernard Shaw.

Among her off-Broadway shows are "A Lie of the Mind" as Beth, directed and written by Sam Shepard with Harvey Keitel, Aidan Quinn and Geraldine Page, "Killer Joe" by Tracy Letts, "The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Any More" by Tennessee Williams, and "A Taste of Honey" with Valerie French. In England, at the Guilford Theatre she appeared as Eliza Doolittle in "Pygmalion," and at the Royal Court Theatre did "This Is a Chair", directed by Stephen Daldry and written by Carol Churchill. Her regional work includes Juliet in "Romeo & Juliet" (Hollywood Dramalogue Award) and Sonya in "Uncle Vanya," Frankie in "A Member of the Wedding," "Two Rooms," and "The Wake of Jamey Foster" by Beth Henley.

Amanda's film work includes Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction (1994) (American Comedy Award nomination), Terry Gilliam's The Fisher King (1991) (BAFTA nomination), Michael Winterbottom's Butterfly Kiss (1995), Peter Greenaway's 8 ½ Women (1999)' Larry Clark's Ken Park (2002), Wim Wenders' The Million Dollar Hotel (2000), Sidney Lumet's Daniel (1983), Lamont Johnson's Cattle Annie and Little Britches (1981), and Isabel Coixet's My Life Without Me (2003), and Needful Things (1993) (Saturn Award).

In television she is the recipient of three Emmy Awards, one Emmy nomination, a Cable Ace Award, and a Golden Globe nomination. In 1988 she was honored with the Anti-Defamation League Award for Woman of Achievement.

She will be appearing as Lucky in the filmed workshop, "Core Sample - Goli Otok" with Vanessa Redgrave and Lynn Redgrave, directed by Lenka Udovicki, the artistic director of The Ulysses Theater on Brijuni, Croatia, and also in Lucky McKee's film Red (2008).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Marina PP

Amanda Plummer has appeared in a wide variety of films, including The Fisher King (1991) by Terry Gilliam [the British Film Academy Award nomination for her performance as "Lydia"], Pulp Fiction (1994) by Quentin Tarantino [American Comedy Award nomination for her performance as "Honey Bunny"], Butterfly Kiss (1995) as "Eunice" by Michael Winterbottom and in My Life Without Me (2003) by Isabel Coixet, Pax (1994) by Eduardo Guedes, Daniel (1983) by Sidney Lumet, Ken Park (2002) by Larry Clark and, lately, The Making of Plus One (2010) and Inconceivable (2008) both by 'Mary Mcguckian', among others. Her highly acclaimed work on Broadway has garnered her a Tony award and two Tony Award nominations as well as the Outer Critics Circle Award and Drama Desk Award. She was honored with three Emmy awards, and one Emmy nomination, a Saturn Award, and DVDX nomination, CableAce Award and Golden Globe nomination. She is the recipient of the Anti-defamation League award.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: amanda plummer

Trivia (10)

When she was a girl Amanda wanted to be a jockey. When she was 14, she passed an audition at the Belmont track, riding for Alfred Vanderbilt's stables. Of that she said: "Those were the greatest years of my life."
Great-great-granddaughter of John Joseph Caldwell Abbott, prime minister of Canada.
Nominated in 1981-1982 for a Tony award for outstanding performance by an actress in a play for "A Taste Of Honey".
Won Broadway's 1982 Tony Award for Best Actress (Featured Role - Play) for "Agnes of God." That same year, she also received a Tony nomination as Best Actress (Play) for a revival of "A Taste of Honey" -- making her one of only three actors (Dana Ivey and Kate Burton are the others) to receive two Tony acting nominations in the same year. In 1987, she received another Tony nomination as Best Actress (Play) for her role as Eliza Doolittle in a revival of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," opposite Peter O'Toole's Henry Higgins.
She and her father both received Emmy nominations in 2005. She won but he did not.
Two of her first four roles were in films adapted from John Irving novels: The World According to Garp (1982) and The Hotel New Hampshire (1984).
Stepdaughter of Elaine Taylor.
Ex-stepdaughter of Jeremy Slate.
Amanda's middle name is Michael, after her godmother, Michael Learned.

Personal Quotes (8)

I like devilish, thorny, dirty, mean roles, muck and mire, unbelievably sad, unbelievably happy, burdened. Inner conflict - that's where drama is.
Producers generally don't like me; directors do, generally. Convincing the producers is hard. They can't see the commercial value behind such a face, nor would they get a commercial value, necessarily - and I don't mean that in a good way or a bad way.
I like taking a path into new country, and I always take the darker path. Not because it's dark, but because there's a secret there that you can share when you get out. That's what I liked as a kid. That's how I approach my work. With a face like mine, it's lucky I have a heart that likes that.
I don't find anything interesting about the choices a character faces in major films or theater projects. The characters are just cut-out dolls with the American flag sewn on them.
I don't play roles everybody likes. I'd rather have a career I'm proud of. Like everyone else, I need to eat. But I'm a very unbusinesslike person, and I keep my price low. I'm not a mass product. I'm not everyone's cup of tea.
I prefer theater, but I love to do films, and I prefer theater primarily because I've done more. I know less about movies. You can't lie in either medium. The wonderful thing is that the camera, just like an audience, is made out of skin - because celluloid is skin.
I had a strong propensity, which I still have, to be invisible. In grade school, I'd try to disappear and become formless. I lived in a very imaginary world. I loved poetry and wrote my first novel when I was 9. It was about a little girl and the people she met in the woods.
Before college, I acted in my room, to classical music, because music tells stories. I'd put on a record and proceed, silently. I'd keep putting the needle back to a certain segment because I hadn't died well enough. I had to really, really feel dead. I'd love to do a death scene.

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