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Miles Teller talks playing the hero in Only the Brave and Thank You for Your Service

  • Cineplex
Miles Teller talks playing the hero in Only the Brave and Thank You for Your ServiceMiles Teller talks playing the hero in Only the Brave and Thank You for Your ServiceJim Slotek, Cineplex Magazine10/18/2017 9:52:00 Am

Even before he starred in last year’s boxing movie actually called Bleed for This, Miles Teller proved he was willing to bleed for his craft — all over his drum kit in his breakthrough, Oscar-nominated film Whiplash, for example.

Teller, whose acting has been defined by extreme choices of late, is back on screen testing his limits in two movies this month, playing a firefighter battling a killer blaze in Only the Brave and an Iraq War veteran in Thank You for Your Service. Both films are based on true stories.

Written and directed by American Sniper author Jason Hill, based on David Finkel’s 2013 non-fiction book, Thank You for Your Service tells
See full article at Cineplex »

Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs Screening This Saturday Night at Webster University

“Now listen up, Mr. Pink. There’s two ways we can do this job. My way… or the highway!”

Reservoir Dogs will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium Saturday September 16th at 7:30pm

Quentin Tarantino’s feature-length directorial debut, Reservoir Dogs (1992) depicts the events before and after a botched diamond heist. The film features Harvey Keitel (Mr. White), Michael Madsen (Mr. Blonde), Steve Buscemi (Mr. Pink), Chris Penn (Nice Guy Eddie Cabot), Lawrence Tierney (Joe Cabot), Tim Roth (Mr. Orange), and Tarantino (Mr. Brown). Tarantino displays many themes that have become his style and influenced a generation of filmmakers: choreographed violent crime, pop culture references, nonlinear storytelling, dialogue punctuated with profanity.

Somewhere along the way, opinions on Quentin Tarantino have become divided – some still loving his work, others calling it bloated and unnecessarily inflated. However, those are two criticisms that cannot be levelled at his first film. It
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Reservoir Dogs Turns 25! 10 Colourful Facts

  • Cineplex
Reservoir Dogs Turns 25! 10 Colourful FactsReservoir Dogs Turns 25! 10 Colourful FactsKurt Anthony9/1/2017 10:00:00 Am

They say that every dog has its day, and today is the 25th anniversary of Quentin Tarantino’s American crime thriller, Reservoir Dogs!

After competing in the dog-eat-dog world of film festival screenings, Reservoir Dogs made its theatrical debut in France on September 2, 1992. Pulling triple duty as writer, actor, and director, the independent heist flick was Tarantino’s first feature-length film and instantly cemented his place at the top of Hollywood’s dogpile, paving the way for future films like Pulp Fiction (1994) and Jackie Brown (1997).

With a budget of $1.2M and a domestic box office gross of over $2.8M, the independent underdog has since earned its bloody, cult classic status and is often referred to as “the greatest independent film ever made.”

Button up your suit jacket and join our pack as we unleash ten colourful facts
See full article at Cineplex »

Kevin Bacon and John Lithgow Reminisce About Filming ‘Footloose’

Kevin Bacon and John Lithgow Reminisce About Filming ‘Footloose’
John Lithgow is happy to say he only has one degree of separation from Kevin Bacon.

The two shared the screen in a little movie — cue laughs — that Bacon calls “the F-film.” The movie Bacon is referring to, of course, is the 1984 mega-hit “Footloose.”

In a conversation for Variety’s “Actors on Actors” series, Bacon and Lithgow shared stories from the only time the pair worked on a film together, in a role Bacon calls “life-changing.”

Lithgow’s first memory of working with Bacon was before the two even officially met.

“In my box at that dismal little motel where we all lived, it was a note from you saying what an honor it was to work with me. [It] made me feel very old,” Lithgow said.

Added Lithgow, “You definitely used the word ‘honored,’ which was more than I deserved.”

“It was true,” said Bacon, who admitted he didn’t remember leaving the note. “I
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Kevin Bacon and John Lithgow Reminisce About Filming ‘Footloose’

Kevin Bacon and John Lithgow Reminisce About Filming ‘Footloose’
John Lithgow is happy to say he only has one degree of separation from Kevin Bacon.

The two shared the screen in a little movie — cue laughs — that Bacon calls “the F-film.” The movie Bacon is referring to, of course, is the 1984 mega-hit “Footloose.”

In a conversation for Variety’s “Actors on Actors” series, Bacon and Lithgow shared stories from the only time the pair worked on a film together, in a role Bacon calls “life-changing.”

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Lithgow’s first memory of working with Bacon was before the two even officially met.

“In my box at that dismal little motel where we all lived, it was a note from you saying what an honor it was to work with me. [It] made me feel very old,” Lithgow said.

Added Lithgow, “You definitely used the word ‘honored,’ which was more than I deserved.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Happy Birthday, Bob Dylan! The Music Legend’s 10 Best Film Performances

Happy Birthday, Bob Dylan! The Music Legend’s 10 Best Film Performances
Bob Dylan turns 76 today and we’re ranking Dylan’s 10 best film performances, dating back half a century to 1967. The key word is “performances,” which encompass acting work, concert films, and documentaries. It’s often hard to know when Dylan is acting and when he’s being himself (whoever that is), but whenever the iconic singer-songwriter appears on film, one thing’s for certain: you’re watching a performance.

Bob Dylan’s ‘Don’t Look Back’ Gets Deluxe Treatment With New Blu-ray Set

For this reason, we’re lumping everything together, ranking the films based on the depth and richness of performance. It was hard not to include the televised 1965 press conference in San Francisco, which sees Dylan effortlessly (and hilariously) shoot down reporters’ attempts to have him label himself, but we limited this list to feature-length films. Don’t look for Todd Haynes’ “I’m Not There” or any
See full article at Indiewire »

7 Things You Don’t Know About ‘Reservoir Dogs,’ As Told by Quentin Tarantino and the Cast

7 Things You Don’t Know About ‘Reservoir Dogs,’ As Told by Quentin Tarantino and the Cast
Mr. White, Mr. Orange, Mr. Blonde, Mr. Pink, Mr. Brown: They all reunited for the 25th anniversary retrospective screening of “Reservoir Dogs” at the Tribeca Film Festival April 28. Cast members Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Steve Buscemi and writer-director-actor Quentin Tarantino all got together to reminisce after the 1992 movie screened to a packed house at the Beacon Theater. Here are seven fun facts they revealed.

1. Tom Waits auditioned.

Tarantino let this tidbit slip as he discussed the casting process. “We had the casting director from ‘L.A. Law,'” the director recalled. “A lot of really wild people came in and read the parts. Tom Waits came in and read. I had Tom Waits read the Madonna speech, just so I could hear Tom Waits say those lines. And actually, other than Harvey, he gave me one of the first profound compliments on the script. No one had ever
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Best Of The Best: The Greatest Movie Actors and the roles that made them great

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

The prospective candidates for admission to MiB were hand-picked because they were the best of the best of the best. That’s a lot of superlatives. Eric Roberts and Chris Penn were two of the more unlikely members of a Tae Kwon Do team that took on Korea in The Best of the Best and across pretty much every athletic and artistic theatre of endeavour you can think of, debate rages as to who is the best of the best. Today we look at the greatest movie actors.

This new series of articles is not intended to lay such arguments to rest. Instead it will hopefully prompt some discussion and (polite) debate as we consider, within certain film-making disciplines, who might be considered to be the best and what is their best work. Highly subjective, of course, but that is whence springs healthy debate. We’ll get to actresses,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Sundance 2017 Announces Late Additions, From The Collection Films and Quentin Tarantino Q&A

Sundance 2017 Announces Late Additions, From The Collection Films and Quentin Tarantino Q&A
The 2017 Sundance Film Festival may already have announced their premieres, Spotlights, Competition and Next lineup, among other films and installations, but there’s four more features joining the festival.

Sundance Institute has added two Documentary Premieres and two archive From The Film Collection movies to next year’s lineup. The two documentaries are “Bending the Arc” and “Long Strange Trip,” with the archive films being “Desert Hearts” and “Reservoir Dogs,” which premiered at Sundance in 1986 and 1992, respectively. The 25th anniversary screening of Quentin Tarantino’s classic will be followed by an extended Q&A with Tarantino and producer Lawrence Bender.

Read More: Sundance 2017: The Lineup So Far

The archive films are selections from the the Sundance Institute Collection at UCLA, a joint venture between UCLA Film & Television Archive and Sundance Institute, established in 1997. With these additions, the festival will present 118 feature-length films, which represent 32 countries and 37 first-time filmmakers. For
See full article at Indiewire »

Two docs, two from the archives join Sundance 2017 roster

  • ScreenDaily
Two docs, two from the archives join Sundance 2017 roster
Festival brass on Wednesday added two Documentary Premieres as well as a pair of favourites from the vaults – Desert Hearts and Reservoir Dogs.

Documentary Premieres are Haitian activism story Bending The Arc from Kief Davidson and Pedro Kos, and Long Strange Trip, about The Grateful Dead, from Happy Valley and The Tillman Story director Amir Bar-Lev.

Desert Hearts and Reservoir Dogs premiered at Sundance in 1986 and 1992, respectively. Quentin Tarantino and Reservoir Dogs producer Lawrence Bender will participate in a post-screening Q&A.

The archive films are selections from the Sundance Institute Collection at UCLA, a joint venture between UCLA Film & Television Archive and Sundance Institute established in 1997 that has grown to more than 4,000 holdings representing close to 2,300 titles.

The four additions boost the 2017 roster to 118 feature films representing 32 countries and 37 first-time filmmakers, including 20 in competition.

Entries were selected from 13,782 submissions including 4,068 features and 8,985 shorts. Of the feature submissions, 2,005 were from the Us and 2,063 were international. One hundred
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Short Cuts

Success in the ’90s gave Robert Altman the opportunity to experiment once again. Several short stories by Raymond Carver interlock in a mosaic of Los Angeles populated by scores of actors in ensemble mode. Clocking in at three hours, Altman’s epic has all the time and space it needs.

Short Cuts

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 265

1993 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 187 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 18, 2016 / 39.95

Starring Andie MacDowell, Bruce Davison, Jack Lemmon, Julianne Moore,

Matthew Modine, Anne Archer, Fred Ward, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Chris Penn, Lili Taylor, Robert Downey Jr., Madeleine Stowe, Tim Robbins, Lily Tomlin, Tom Waits, Frances McDormand, Peter Gallagher, Annie Ross, Lori Singer, Lyle Lovett, Buck Henry, Huey Lewis, Margery Bond, Robert DoQui.

Cinematography Walt Lloyd

Production Designer Stephen Altman

Art Direction Jerry Fleming

Film Editors Suzy Elmiger, Geraldine Peroni

Original Music Gavin Friday, Mark Isham

Written by Robert Altman, Frank Barhydt from writings
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Video: Nine Actors Whose Careers Got a Big Boost from Quentin Tarantino

  • PEOPLE.com
Video: Nine Actors Whose Careers Got a Big Boost from Quentin Tarantino
What jumps to mind when you hear the phrase "Quentin Tarantino movie"? Hyperviolence? A bunch of different B-movies pastiched into something new? A lot of dialogue with a lot of bad language? That one "F" word in particular? Any of those could be right, but there's another thing many of Tarantino's movies have in common: a big, meaty role for an actor who's maybe in need of a career boost. In the case of the Tarantino movie currently in theaters, The Hateful Eight, the role is that of Daisy Domergue, a wily, foul-mouthed criminal played by Jennifer Jason Leigh. Now Leigh hasn't been without work.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Patricia Arquette, Christian Slater Are Back and Cooler Than Ever in ‘True Romance’ Live Read

Patricia Arquette, Christian Slater Are Back and Cooler Than Ever in ‘True Romance’ Live Read
“There’s a lot of bad language in this one!”

So joked director Jason Reitman as he launched the latest installment of Film Independent’s popular Live Read series on Wednesday night with one of his most anticipated selections yet: Quentin Tarantino’s scorching script for the dark comic thriller “True Romance.”

“We’re going to be reading an early draft, so you’ll notice some changes,” Reitman said. “That’s one of the fun things about doing these. It’s a weird kind of archeology where you get to figure out how the movie you love started.”

With the announcement that original stars Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette would reprise their roles as lovers-on-the-run Clarence and Alabama Worley, demand for tickets increased, prompting a move from the 600-seat Bing Theater at Lacma to The Theater at Ace Hotel in downtown La, which seats 1,600.

As always, the reading was performed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

BFI Review – True Romance (1993)

True Romance, 1993

Directed by Tony Scott.

Starring Christian Slater, Patricia Arquette, Dennis Hopper, Michael Rapaport, James Gandolfini, Christopher Walken, Gary Oldman, Samuel L. Jackson, Val Kilmer and Brad Pitt.

Synopsis:

Two lovers are on the run after killing a small-time pimp and stealing his drugs …

“You’re so cool”. The three words Patricia Arquette’s Alabama has running through her mind during the finale of Tony Scott’s True Romance. With a script by Quentin Tarantino, a cast that places Brad Pitt in a minor role and a score that seems equally jarring yet perfect, this is a film no one forgets. These early days, when Tarantino simply took his pay check by providing pop-culture savvy scripts to Scott and Oliver Stone, has a comic-book playful tone that even Qt fails to create in his productions. True Romance is edgy, fast and a huge amount of fun. With a shotgun
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1986

From thrillers to sci-fi to horror, here's our pick of 20 films from 1986 that surely deserve a bit more love...

A fascinating year for film, 1986. It was a time when a glossy, expensive movie about handsome men in planes could dominate the box-office, sure (that would be Top Gun). But it was also a year when Oliver Stone went off with just $6m and came back with Platoon, one of the biggest hits of the year both financially and in terms of accolades. It was also a period when the British movie industry was briefly back on its feet, resulting in a new golden age of great films - one or two of them are even on this list.

As ever, there were certain films that, despite their entertainment value or genuine brilliance in terms of movie making, somehow managed to slip through the net. So to redress the balance a little,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Bart & Fleming: How TV Gives Second Acts To Movie Makers; Journo Eating Disorders; Late Summer Movie Burials

Bart & Fleming: How TV Gives Second Acts To Movie Makers; Journo Eating Disorders; Late Summer Movie Burials
Peter Bart and Mike Fleming Jr. worked together for two decades at Daily Variety. In this occasional column, two old friends get together and grind their axes, mostly on the movie business. Fleming: We broke news Thursday that Universal is setting James Foley to direct the second and possibly the third (if they shoot back to back) installments of the Fifty Shades Of Grey juggernaut. Remember him? Starting in the ’80s, he got great performances out of Sean and Chris Penn
See full article at Deadline »

Do audiences want quality movies? L.A. Earthquake Flick to Pass Domestic $100M Mark Today

'San Andreas' movie with Dwayne Johnson. 'San Andreas' movie box office: $100 million domestic milestone today As the old saying (sort of) goes: If you build it, they will come. Warner Bros. built a gigantic video game, called it San Andreas, and They have come to check out Dwayne Johnson perform miraculous deeds not seen since ... George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, released two weeks earlier. Embraced by moviegoers, hungry for quality, original storylines and well-delineated characters – and with the assistance of 3D surcharges – the San Andreas movie debuted with $54.58 million from 3,777 theaters on its first weekend out (May 29-31) in North America. Down a perfectly acceptable 52 percent on its second weekend (June 5-7), the special effects-laden actioner collected an extra $25.83 million, trailing only the Melissa McCarthy-Jason Statham comedy Spy, (with $29.08 million) as found at Box Office Mojo.* And that's how this original movie – it's not officially a remake,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 1989

From a crazy early Nic Cage role to a lesser-known film starring Robert De Niro, here's our pick of 25 underappreciated films from 1989...

Ah, 1989. The year the Berlin Wall came down and Yugoslavia won the Eurovision Song Contest. It was also a big year for film, with Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade topping the box office and Batman dominating the summer with its inescapable marketing blitz.

Outside the top 10 highest-grossing list, which included Back To The Future II, Dead Poets Society and Honey I Shrunk The Kids, 1989 also included a plethora of less commonly-appreciated films. Some were big in their native countries but only received a limited release in the Us and UK. Others were poorly received but have since been reassessed as cult items.

From comedies to thrillers, here's our pick of 25 underappreciated films from the end of the 80s...

25. An Innocent Man

Disney, through its Touchstone banner, had high hopes for this thriller,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Karlovy Vary to Celebrate 50th Festival With Free Concert, Chris Penn and John Cazale Tributes

Karlovy Vary to Celebrate 50th Festival With Free Concert, Chris Penn and John Cazale Tributes
The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, one of Europe’s longest-running festivals, will throw a massive public party to celebrate its 50th festival in July, as well as staging special salutes to the late actors John Cazale and Chris Penn. Kviff organizers announced details of the 50th festival on Tuesday, with the celebrations also including a concert by Czech rock band Lucie, a week of programming devoted to Lebanese cinema, a retrospective of the work of the late Soviet director Larisa Shepitko, and a program devoted to 10 young directors from European film schools. The festival, which takes place in a picturesque.
See full article at The Wrap »

Karlovy Vary Film Fest's 50th Anniversary Program Is a Love Letter to Cinephiles

Karlovy Vary Film Fest's 50th Anniversary Program Is a Love Letter to Cinephiles
Karlovy Vary's jubilee edition will include a retrospective of Lebanese films from the last 25 years, and tributes to late Soviet-Ukrainian auteur Larisa Shepitko and American actors John Cazale and Chris Penn. Karlovy Vary laureate Mel Gibson, returning to the festival this year after winning the 2014 Crystal Globe for Outstanding Artistic Contribution to World Cinema, will film a special festival trailer in Los Angeles in early May. The trailer will be written and directed by Martin Krejčí, who has helmed many of this historic festival's past trailers. A Week of Lebanese Cinema Kviff annually spotlights under-seen films from far-flung regions, from Young Greek Cinema to A Female Take on Russia, and this year has programmed eight Lebanese titles from the last 25 years. Making plenty of room for women directors, films include "Hors la Vie" (1991), director Maroun Bagdadi's Cannes Jury Prize winner about the abduction of a French journalist; Ziad Doueiri's.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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