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1-20 of 90 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Asian American TV Actors Expose the Difficulty of Landing Parts – With or Without an Accent

11 October 2017 12:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Daniel Dae Kim made headlines this year for leaving “Hawaii Five-0” over issues of pay inequality, and later, for replacing actor Ed Skrein as a Japanese-American character in the big-screen remake of “Hellboy.” Both instances involved how Asian Americans are still underrepresented in the entertainment industry, and it’s an issue that requires more discussion in order to foster understanding of how the so-called “model minority” continues to be marginalized.

It wasn’t that long ago that very few actors of Asian descent were even considered Hollywood stars. In an interview with IndieWire, Kim reflected on the few Asian actors who were his role models growing up.

“The only two that I can think of were Bruce Lee and George Takei. They were the only two,” he said. “I was a big ‘Star Trek’ fan when I was a kid, and I would watch Mister Sulu all the time. Bruce Lee, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Asian American TV Actors Expose the Difficulty of Landing Parts – With or Without an Accent

11 October 2017 12:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Daniel Dae Kim made headlines this year for leaving “Hawaii Five-0” over issues of pay inequality, and later, for replacing actor Ed Skrein as a Japanese-American character in the big-screen remake of “Hellboy.” Both instances involved how Asian Americans are still underrepresented in the entertainment industry, and it’s an issue that requires more discussion in order to foster understanding of how the so-called “model minority” continues to be marginalized.

It wasn’t that long ago that very few actors of Asian descent were even considered Hollywood stars. In an interview with IndieWire, Kim reflected on the few Asian actors who were his role models growing up.

“The only two that I can think of were Bruce Lee and George Takei. They were the only two,” he said. “I was a big ‘Star Trek’ fan when I was a kid, and I would watch Mister Sulu all the time. Bruce Lee, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Inside The Process by Anne-Katrin Titze

9 October 2017 3:32 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Rebecca Miller‬ on Tony Kushner and Mike Nichols: "Then I started thinking, well, I want some interviews that are a little bit about the work and to try and get as deep, as far, inside the process as you can." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

"I can't think in abstract terms too much," Arthur Miller says while working on a piece of wood in Rebecca Miller's very personal, marvelously alive and warm and informative documentary that emerged from the discrepancy she sensed between the father she knew and the public persona.

Marilyn Monroe's great attraction, Arthur Miller recalls, was "her honesty," that she was "utterly without guile." Here the flame is her fame. Photos and clips from behind the scenes of The Misfits show an exhausted John Huston and we hear Clark Gable say the same lines to Marilyn that Arthur Miller had said to her in real life. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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50 Years Later: Dustin Hoffman Recalls Mike Nichols’ Vision for ‘The Graduate’

8 October 2017 2:04 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mike Nichols’ “The Graduate,” an adaptation of Charles Webb’s “novel of today’s youth unlike any you have read” (so boasted first-edition copies) hit theaters on Dec. 22, 1967. It received seven Oscar nominations and became an instant classic, helping to launch a new wave of American cinema that would be the story of the next decade. Nichols, meanwhile — hot off a theater career and a film debut in “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” that set the industry ablaze — walked away with the Academy’s best director prize.

The film also launched the screen career of actor Dustin Hoffman, who can’t quite believe it’s been 50 years since this landmark entered the canon.

“It is stunning, because I’m only 47,” the 80-year-old legend quipped on a recent episode of Variety‘s “Playback” podcast while promoting his new film “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected).”

Hoffman recalled that few expected much of the film. “If »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Postcards from the Edge is One Great Classic Film

6 October 2017 8:45 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Postcards from the Edge is a 1990 comedy-drama film directed by Mike Nichols and starring Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine. The screenplay is written by Carrie Fisher which is based on her semi-autobiographical novel of the same title. The film is about the story of Suzanne Vale, a Hollywood actress who is a recovering drug addict. As she exits from rehab, she has to stay with her mother Doris in order to be part of the movie that she wants to be in. Now, she has to maintain her sobriety and sanity as she stays with Doris, who

Postcards from the Edge is One Great Classic Film »

- Michael Baculinao

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Author Erin Carlson on Her New Book “I’ll Have What She’s Having” and the Legacy of Nora Ephron

28 September 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Nora Ephron died in 2012, at the age of 71, but she left an indelible mark on the world as one of the most influential voices of our time. She left behind a strong legacy and continues to inspire new and emerging artists. So, it is no surprise that entertainment journalist Erin Carlson has chosen to write her first book about the late Hollywood powerhouse. In “I’ll Have What She’s Having” she takes readers behind the scenes of the writer-director’s three most successful movies: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” and “You’ve Got Mail.”

I spoke to Carlson about her research process and findings from authoring this book, what she learned about women in Hollywood, Ephron’s impact on the film industry, and more.

W&H: Nora directed her first movie, “This is My Life,” at 50 years old, and the rest is history. How would you describe her impact on the film industry, and rom-coms specifically?

EC: Nora’s gifts as a writer and journalist helped make her as iconic in the romantic comedy genre as her biggest stars and creative collaborators, Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. When Nora directed her own scripts, she was masterful — only she could envision and execute the words and dialogue she wrote and the characters whom she developed. Like any singular artist, she leaves an unmistakable imprint on her work; her sweet and tart voice courses throughout her finest films, which also happened to be her romantic comedies. And she was born to make them.

As the daughter of screenwriter duo Henry and Phoebe Ephron, who raised their four girls in Beverly Hills and specialized in romances, Nora witnessed firsthand the process of writing movies, and bringing them to the big screen. She despised the word “art.” Because she understood that filmmaking was a craft, and with more experience, something at which she could improve. The truth is male directors get more chances than their women counterparts to fail and then score another plum project.

Since her critically acclaimed debut film, “This Is My Life,” did poorly at the box office, TriStar, the studio behind “Sleepless in Seattle,” was initially skeptical about handing this novice the reins of a big-budget romantic comedy — of course, she proved everyone wrong, and that romantic comedy became one of the top-grossing offerings of 1993.

Nora knew that two things contributed to a successful romcom: writing and casting. And hers were wry, knowing, and urbane, yet drenched in the unabashed optimism of the Golden Age classics of her youth. She created strong woman characters who could stand up to the men in their lives, and show them a thing or two. For example, Sally turning the tables on Harry, and acting out a fake orgasm in a deli in “When Harry Met Sally.”

Nora truly believed in the possibility of love between equals, and it was important to her to infuse Sally Albright, Annie Reed, and Kathleen Kelly with a voice — and jokes — as strong as the male lead’s. Why should the guys have all the fun? Nora created worlds in which anything, and everything was possible — worlds that we all still want to live in, and we return to again and again.

W&H: How did you come to land on the three films that you chose to highlight from her career?

EC: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” and “You’ve Got Mail” are a trilogy of romantic comedies that represent Nora’s best and most enduring work, and through which her muse, Meg Ryan, played an instrumental part. These movies are her legacy, with “Julie & Julia” runner-up — because Meryl, Stanley Tucci … butter!

Sleepless in Seattle

W&H:You did a great deal of interviews for this book. Which women in her life did you know that you had to talk to and were there any women who did not want to speak to you?

EC: I knew that I absolutely had to speak with Delia Ephron, Nora’s sister and collaborator who worked with her on “Sleepless” and “You’ve Got Mail.” Delia told me she was the “guardian” of the sisters’ scripts, namely that Nora trusted her to protect the integrity of their screenplays during the filmmaking process. Delia had crucial insight into Nora’s vision and working style. I was lucky to interview her.

Meg Ryan, meanwhile, proved a challenge — just when I thought her publicist would connect me for an interview, she went radio silent even though Tom Hanks, her beloved colleague, had spoken with me. At the time, “Star” magazine had done a series of unflattering covers of Meg, and it appeared that she felt burned by the media and potentially even talking to journalists. Who can blame her? However, rather than Meg give me PR-approved soundbites about her own legacy in romantic comedy, it was more fascinating to put together a portrait of her based on my wide-ranging interviews with the folks who could speak openly and honestly about her transformation from ingenue to leading lady in the span of “When Harry Met Sally” to “Sleepless.”

W&H: I loved reading about Nora’s relationships with different men in Hollywood during the course of her career. Can you talk about these relationships, and particularly any sexism in the film industry that she faced during the course of her career?

EC: Nora was married three times. Her first husband was the comedy writer Dan Greenburg, whom she divorced amid the feminist movement that shook things up in the 1970s; her second was Carl Bernstein, who, together with Bob Woodward, linked Watergate to President Nixon. Bernstein left her for another woman while she was pregnant with their second child.

That experience traumatized and humiliated her — but she had the last laugh when she wrote the juicy novel “Heartburn,” a thinly veiled account of the demise of her marriage to Bernstein. That book, of course, became the movie with Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson; Bernstein did not want this movie to get made, though he reportedly loved that Jack, the hottest movie star of his day, was playing a fictional version of Carl.

Several years later, Nora married Nick Pileggi, her third — and best — husband. Pileggi is a “famously nice guy,” as Nora has written, and renowned for his reporting on the Mafia. He wrote the book which inspired Martin Scorsese’s “Goodfellas.” More importantly, he adored Nora and relished in her success, rather than harbor resentment toward it.

But you’re asking me about Nora’s relationships with men in Hollywood! Well, she and “When Harry Met Sally” director Rob Reiner were pretty tight. He trusted her and believed in her talent and gave her the credit of associate producer on his movie; even though he had a hand in co-writing the script for Harry and Sally, Nora received the sole credit as the screenwriter, as well as the only Oscar nomination for anyone involved with the film. That says a lot about Rob. He’s a mensch, with a strong mother.

Rob appreciated Nora and her contributions and what she brought to the character of Sally as well as her keen social observations and killer one-liners. They understood each other as comic writers and as the children of parents who were successful in showbiz. With Nora, Rob saw an equal. It is utterly mystifying to me that he still believes that men and women’t can’t be friends — how, then, could Nora continue to work in Hollywood and be friends with men like Rob, or Mike Nichols, or Tom Hanks? That is the great irony.

When Harry Met Sally

W&H: What did you learn about women’s roles in Hollywood while writing this book?

EC: It’s still a man’s world, with shitty roles for women and a dearth of directing opportunities. Like Nora, if women want to create movies and TV series centered on female characters, then they will need to write and direct material they originate and cultivate themselves.

W&H: Which modern women in Hollywood have been greatly influenced by Nora?

EC: Funny you ask: Since Lena Dunham was mentored by Nora, and is a hugely talented writer-director in her own right, people want to categorize Lena as the new Nora. She’s not. Lena is open and unfiltered where Nora was self-possessed, always aware of the boundaries between people.

If I had to choose a Nora heir, it would have to be Tina Fey. Tina led “Saturday Night Live” for years before “30 Rock,” and the two women share a similar arch, self-deprecating sense of humor and B.S. detector that have won them zillions of female fans. Plus, they set their movies and TV shows in New York, capturing the endless idiosyncrasies of the Greatest City in the World.

Another thing: I know it sounds weird, but Taylor Swift also reminds me of Nora. She just keeps bouncing back from shit, and reinventing herself, and writing about her love life and exes within a narrative in which Taylor always wins as the heroine, never the victim, of her own story. Her own romantic comedy. Harry Styles be damned!

“You’ve Got Mail”

W&H: How far have women come since then and how do you think Nora would feel about where women in Hollywood are today?

EC: Following a summer in which Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” kicked ass, and Nicole Kidman and Elisabeth Moss cleaned up at the Emmys, it’s easy to feel better about the state of women in Hollywood today. However, we have a long way to go toward creating roles for actresses that are as compelling as those men get to play — and not just love interests, mothers, wives, and daughters.

Nora, a barrier-breaking feminist, loathed panels on women in film. She hated labels and felt trapped by them and wanted to be known as a “director,” not a “woman director.” That said, she would doubtless be heartened by a newly energized feminist movement of women and girls who are taking less shit and taking more names. “Go out and get what you want,” she might tell them. “Just do it.”

“I’ll Have What She’s Having” is available now and can be purchased on Amazon.

https://medium.com/media/b944fd4727ea47477e9028d3530d9c97/href

Author Erin Carlson on Her New Book “I’ll Have What She’s Having” and the Legacy of Nora Ephron was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Holly Rosen Fink

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Exclusive: Ryan Eggold Talks Directorial Debut and Bittersweet Ride on ‘The Blacklist: Redemption’

26 September 2017 12:45 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

While Ryan Eggold has made a name for himself as the charming star of The Blacklist and the short-lived spinoff, Redemption, the actor has recently been expanding his career behind the camera. The same week he returns to NBC’s spy thriller, he makes his feature directorial debut with Literally, Right Before Aaron.

Starring Justin Long and Cobie Smulders, Eggold’s new film tells the story of a heartbroken Adam (Long), who is invited to his ex-girlfriend Allison's (Smulders) wedding. Adam, as it turns out, is the man Allison dated “literally right before” her fiancé Aaron (Ryan Hansen). As a writer and director, it is his attempt at one of the classic romantic comedies by the likes of Woody Allen, Mike Nichols and Nora Ephron, who all are referenced in the movie. Nichols’ films, Eggold notes, are all about people dealing with people, which is at the core of his story as Adam and Allison navigate a tumultuous »

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New York Film Festival Early Bird highlights by Anne-Katrin Titze

24 September 2017 9:55 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold director Griffin Dunne Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Spotlight on Documentary programme at the 55th New York Film Festival has a number of high profile authors in the spotlight, including Gay Talese in Josh Koury and Myles Kane's Voyeur. Griffin Dunne's Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold with interviews with Harrison Ford, David Hare, Anna Wintour, Calvin Trillin, and Vanessa Redgrave (her Sea Sorrow is in the festival with Emma Thompson and Ralph Fiennes), and Rebecca Miller's portrait Arthur Miller: Writer (with Tony Kushner and Mike Nichols commenting on her father's career) are two excellent insider depictions. Aki Kaurismäki's The Other Side Of Hope (starring Sherwan Haji, Sakari Kuosmanen) and Chloé Zhao's The Rider, screening in the Main Slate, round out the four early bird highlights.

The Rider is the winner of the <a href=" »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Hillary Clinton’s Craziest Pop Culture References in ‘What Happened’: ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Star Wars,’ ‘Veep,’ and More

22 September 2017 2:21 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

You can tell a lot about a person by the television they watch and the books they read — even while they reveal their theories as to why they lost a Presidential election.

Clinton’s new memoir, “What Happened,” chronicling her experiences surrounding the 2016 election, is surprisingly candid on a number of levels. For example, regarding her coping mechanisms following the loss of the election, “It wasn’t all yoga and breathing: I also drank my share of chardonnay.”

But even more fascinating are the ways in which she invokes current pop culture. Some of the references feel more forced than others. Some of them are truly bonkers.

This is not a complete list of every reference made, as we omitted some of the religious, spiritual, and historical texts upon which she drew to make her points. Instead, here is all the evidence you need that the Clintons know their way around a TV remote, »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Hillary Clinton’s Craziest Pop Culture References in ‘What Happened’: ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Star Wars,’ ‘Veep,’ and More

22 September 2017 2:21 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

You can tell a lot about a person by the television they watch and the books they read — even while they reveal their theories as to why they lost a Presidential election.

Clinton’s new memoir, “What Happened,” chronicling her experiences surrounding the 2016 election, is surprisingly candid on a number of levels. For example, regarding her coping mechanisms following the loss of the election, “It wasn’t all yoga and breathing: I also drank my share of chardonnay.”

But even more fascinating are the ways in which she invokes current pop culture. Some of the references feel more forced than others. Some of them are truly bonkers.

This is not a complete list of every reference made, as we omitted some of the religious, spiritual, and historical texts upon which she drew to make her points. Instead, here is all the evidence you need that the Clintons know their way around a TV remote, »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Mary Goldberg, Casting Director on 'Amadeus' and 'Alien,' Dies at 72

11 September 2017 10:31 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Mary Goldberg, an award-winning casting director who collaborated on plays with Joseph Papp and on films with Milos Forman, Ridley Scott and Mike Nichols, has died. She was 72.

Goldberg died Thursday at her home in Ojai, Calif., after a short battle with lung cancer, publicist Tamara Trione announced.

In 1985, the Casting Society of America presented Goldberg with an award for outstanding feature film casting at the inaugural Artios Awards ceremony for her work on Forman's Amadeus (1984), winner of eight Academy Awards, including best picture. She earlier teamed with Forman on Ragtime (1981), James Cagney's final movie.

Goldberg »

- Mike Barnes

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Mary Goldberg, Casting Director on 'Amadeus' and 'Alien,' Dies at 72

11 September 2017 10:31 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Mary Goldberg, an award-winning casting director who collaborated on plays with Joseph Papp and on films with Milos Forman, Ridley Scott and Mike Nichols, has died. She was 72.

Goldberg died Thursday at her home in Ojai, Calif., after a short battle with lung cancer, publicist Tamara Trione announced.

In 1985, the Casting Society of America presented Goldberg with an award for outstanding feature film casting at the inaugural Artios Awards ceremony for her work on Forman's Amadeus (1984), winner of eight Academy Awards, including best picture. She earlier teamed with Forman on Ragtime (1981), James Cagney's final movie.

Goldberg »

- Mike Barnes

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The Graduate Screens This Friday Night at Webster University

10 September 2017 5:47 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Oh no, Mrs. Robinson. I think, I think you’re the most attractive of all my parents’ friends. I mean that!”

The Graduate  will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium Friday September 15th at 7:30pm.

The Graduate (1967), director Mike Nichols’ second feature after he debuted with Who’S Afraid Of Virginia Wolf? (1966), is still a delightful classic and a nostalgic piece of its time, to say the least. Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman, 30 years old at the time, convincingly playing someone a decade his junior) is fresh out of college, and comes back to his rich parents’ house in a California suburb. Bored and undecided about what to do with his life, Benjamin is seduced by a friend of the family, middle-aged Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft, who was actually only 36). When Mrs. Robinson’s daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross) shows up, Benjamin is forced to take her on a date. »

- Tom Stockman

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Shelley Berman, Stand-Up Comic and ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Actor, Dies at 92

1 September 2017 7:49 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Famed stand-up comic Shelley Berman, who recently played Larry David’s father on “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” has died. He was 92.

Berman died early Friday morning due to complications from Alzheimer’s Disease at his home in Bell Canyon, Calif., his publicist confirmed to Variety.

The Grammy winner and Emmy-nominated actor was one of the most successful stand-up comedians of the 1950s and ’60s. His 1959 live record, “Inside Shelley Berman,” was the first comedy album to be certified gold (with more than 500,000 sales) and was the first non-musical recording to win a Grammy Award. Two other albums, “Outside Shelley Berman” and “The Edge of Shelley Berman,” also went gold.

Berman was the first stand-up comic to perform at Carnegie Hall. He appeared on “The Ed Sullivan Show” more than 20 times and was a guest on shows hosted by Steve Allen, Jack Paar, Dinah Shore, Perry Como, Andy Williams, and Dean Martin.

The »

- Maane Khatchatourian and Dave McNary

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‘Dirty Dancing’ at 30: How Baby and Johnny Won Over the Skeptics

18 August 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s been 30 years since Baby and Johnny had the time of their life, but “Dirty Dancing” remains as popular as when it opened on Aug. 21, 1987. Actually, it’s even more popular: When the ABC remake aired May 24 this year, fans immediately registered anger and/or disappointment on social media. It was a reminder that the magic of the 1987 version could not be duplicated.

The original “Dirty Dancing” was one of the summer’s biggest surprises. It was filmed on a $6 million budget and earned $213 million at the box office, plus has a long and booming afterlife in video and spinoffs.

Filming of the Vestron movie — written by Eleanor Bergstein and directed by Emile Ardolino — was done on two main locations: Lake Lure in N.C., and the Mountain Lake Lodge in Giles County, Va. Mountain Lake was responsible for many of the exterior shots. The lodge, built in the 1930s, had »

- Tim Gray

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We chat to The Graduate Producer Lawrence Turman to celebrate 50 years of the awesome classic

11 August 2017 6:13 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Adam Lowes

Here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson! The classic coming-of-age yarn The Graduate is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. To mark this very special occasion we spoke with the film’s producer, Lawrence Turman.

Having reached something of a landmark age himself last year in turning 90, Mr. Turman has had a long and illustrious career in Hollywood, with an array of iconic films under his belt as producer, including The Thing, American History X and Short Circuit. Taking time out from his schedule (still working, he teaches film classes at the University of Southern California) Mr. Turman chatted with us about the enduring legacy of the film.

HeyUGuys: Congratulations on this milestone. Firstly, what do you think it is about the film which has awarded it this longevity?

Lawrence Truman: I chuckle because if I knew, I’d have constantly repeated it.

How did the project materialise? »

- Adam Lowes

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‘Fast Times’ at 35: Cameron Crowe, Amy Heckerling on Courting David Lynch, Sean Penn’s Method Acting, Genital Equality

10 August 2017 2:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The seminal teen flick “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” is celebrating its 35th anniversary on Sunday.

Not only did the coming-of-age tale set in Southern California launch the careers of director Amy Heckerling and writer Cameron Crowe, the comedy catapulted Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Phoebe Cates, and Judge Reinhold into stardom.

And in 2005, “Fast Times,” which was based on Crowe’s 1981 book chronicling his adventures going undercover at a San Diego high school, was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Ironically, “Fast Times” had to overcome many obstacles during production and almost failed to get released.

Among the early difficulties the production encountered was finding a director for the comedy, which also featured future best actor Oscar winners Forest Whitaker and Nicolas Cage — billed as Nicolas Coppola — as well as Eric Stoltz and Anthony Edwards.

Universal executive Thom Mount surprisingly recommended David Lynch, who »

- Susan King

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Bad Books That Made Great Films

8 August 2017 6:07 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

In reference to movie adaptations of books, it is often said that “the book was better”. This is a look at some of the films where the opposite is true.

When I think about books that have made the transition to the big screen, I consider the reason that those books were chosen for adaptation. A lot of the time, I assume that the books are chosen because of their popularity. Movie studios want to make money, and by making a movie version of a popular book, they can cash in on that popularity. At other times, a book may be chosen because it has a unique concept that would make for an interesting film. In a time when it seems like script writers can’t come up with any new ideas, it makes sense to try and find inspiration in print. Likewise, a book may be chosen because of the person who wrote it. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Silkwood

5 August 2017 9:23 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

It’s a quality true-life mystery-exposé that doesn’t come off as tabloid trash or Oliver Stone hysteria — the true story of Karen Silkwood is told without cooking the books. The all-superstar cast is something too — Meryl Streep, Cher and Kurt Russell. Only a fine director like Mike Nichols could steer this one into good entertainment & memorable cinema territory.

Silkwood

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1983 / Color B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 131 min. / Street Date July 25, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Meryl Streep, Kurt Russell, Cher, Craig T. Nelson, Diana Scarwid, Fred Ward, Ron Silver, Charles Hallahan.

Cinematography: Miroslav Ondrícek

Production Designer: Patrizia von Brandenstein

Art Direction: Richard D. James

Film Editor: Sam O’Steen

Original Music: Georges Delerue

Written by Alice Arlen and Nora Ephron

Produced by Larry Cano, Michael Hausman, Buzz Hirsch, Mike Nichols

Directed by Mike Nichols

Remember when the big movies about adult themes were in the theaters, and not on cable TV? »

- Glenn Erickson

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Blu-ray Review – Silkwood (1983)

30 July 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Silkwood, 1983.

Directed by Mike Nichols

Starring Meryl Streep, Kurt Russell, Cher, Craig T. Nelson, Fred Ward, Ron Silver, David Strathairn, M. Emmet Walsh

Synopsis:

Silkwood, the 1983 film from Mike Nichols that was nominated for five Academy Awards, arrives on a new Blu-ray from Kino Lorber that features an interview with producer Michael Hausman. Meryl Streep, Kurt Russell, and Cher are the main stars of this film that’s based on a true story.

Silkwood is a movie about isolation. Based on a true story, it tells the tale of Karen Silkwood (Meryl Streep), who works at an Oklahoma nuclear material processing facility with her boyfriend, Drew (Kurt Russell), and roommate, Dolly (Cher). After becoming contaminated by plutonium, she becomes a union activist for safety issues at the plant, much to the chagrin of some co-workers who don’t want her to rock the boat.

The worst betrayals come from Drew, »

- Brad Cook

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