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How Much Shock Can You Stand?

Ghosts are famous for their flexibility, spiraling through keyholes and up from the floorboards in search of their next mark. But movies about ghosts can be flexible too. Three classics of the genre, The Uninvited, House on Haunted Hill and The Innocents, demonstrate that there’s more than one way haunt a house.

These films never appeared on any triple bill that I know of, but I’d like to think they did, somewhere in some small town with a theater manager that knew a good scare when he saw it. How could the programmer resist it? Each film is united by a beautiful black and white sheen, eerie locales and their ability to scare the bejeezus out of you. But they’re also alike in their differences, coming at their specters from distinctly different vantage points.

1944’s The Uninvited, a three-hankie haunted house tale with a dysfunctional family subplot,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

How ‘This Is Us’ Tackles Alcoholism Head On – and Not for Laughs (Guest Blog)

  • The Wrap
How ‘This Is Us’ Tackles Alcoholism Head On – and Not for Laughs (Guest Blog)
One of the most popular shows on network television, NBC’s “This Is Us,” has veered deeply into the world of alcoholism in season two. This may not seem like big news, especially for a show that tackles just about every other affliction. But making it the critical challenge facing the series’ core marriage (“Be a man and fix it”) is still worth applauding. Movies, of course, have long dealt with alcoholism, from Billy Wilder’s “The Lost Weekend” (which won a Best Actor Oscar for Ray Milland) to “Days of Wine and Roses” which featured a major detour for Jack Lemmon.
See full article at The Wrap »

It Came From The Tube: The Dead Don’T Die (1975)

Director Curtis Harrington always offered up solid, unassuming genre fare on the small screen (How Awful about Allan, the wonderfully goofy Devil Dog: The Hound of Hell); and when he collaborated with noted scribe Robert Bloch (Psycho), the result was NBC’s The Dead Don’t Die (1975), an effective throwback to the Lewton/Turneur era beloved by both, shot through with a big dose of pulpy goodness.

Originally broadcast on January 14th as an NBC World Premiere Movie, Tddd didn’t stand a chance against the likes of the ABC Tuesday Movie of the Week or the ironclad CBS lineup of M*A*S*H/Hawaii Five-o, and Bloch is on the record as not being a fan. Oh well; I still dig its entertaining mashup of neo noir and old fashioned zombies even if he doesn’t. And you might too if that particular elixir peaks your interest.

Crack
See full article at DailyDead »

The Forgotten: Billy Wilder's "The Emperor Waltz" (1948)

  • MUBI
Billy Wilder always more or less disowned his one real musical, which leaves the enthusiast with a choice: keep re-watching the classic Wilder films, of which there are many, or probe into the obscure, disreputable corners of the great man's oeuvre?The year was 1948. Wilder had been involved with the war effort. Lost Weekend had belatedly come out in 1945 and won an Oscar for Ray Milland. And while the rest of Hollywood was churning out movies that developed the film noir genre Wilder had helped launch with Double Indemnity, he made a Bing Crosby musical set in Austria. He claimed it was offered to him, but the script is credited to Wilder and Charles Brackett, so he can't distance himself that easily."On a December night, some forty-odd years ago, His Majesty Franz Joseph the First, Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, Galicia,
See full article at MUBI »

Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part Three: Psychology

It’s not exactly remarkable that cinema has been around long enough to chart the rise of modern psychology. The first century of film covers society’s entire 20th, a hundred-year span rife with innovation in a great many fields. But as art is keen on investigating the psyche, it’s little surprise that cinema would try to keep pace in some way with the study and expression of it. From the psychological thriller to the psychodrama to most horror films, the study of the mind onscreen sometimes unfolds perfectly naturally, and other times feels like a stiff lecture from somebody who read a really fascinating article in Time the month before. Look no further than Psycho for an example of both, but look to three films that played at the TCM Classic Film Festival for some pretty wild takes.

Based on a novel by a prominent psychologist (once president
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘The Assignment’ Review: Michelle Rodriguez Snarls Through Tacky Trans-sploitation Saga

  • The Wrap
‘The Assignment’ Review: Michelle Rodriguez Snarls Through Tacky Trans-sploitation Saga
In “The Assignment,” director and co-writer Walter Hill handles the medical and psychological complexities of transgender surgery with all the subtlety and anatomical understanding of Ray Milland’s head being sewn onto Rosey Grier’s body in “The Thing with Two Heads.” Never mind that the transgender community in this country (and in much of the world) has become a target for hate, with trans individuals more likely to face discrimination, violence and homicide than almost any other segment of the population because of the fear and ignorance promulgated by conservative pundits and politicians: For Hill and co-writer Denis Hamill
See full article at The Wrap »

Manchester by the Sea

Manchester by the Sea

Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD

Lionsgate

2016 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 137 min. / Street Date February 21, 2017 / 39.99

Starring – Casey Affleck, Kyle Chandler, Lucas Hedges, Liam McNeill, C.J. Wilson, Gretchen Mol, Michelle Williams, Matthew Broderick.

Cinematography – Jody Lee Lipes

Film Editor – Jennifer Lame

Original Music – Lesley Barber

Produced by Lauren Beck, Matt Damon, Chris Moore, Kimberly Steward

Written and Directed by Kenneth Lonergan

A major Oscar contender, Kenneth Longergan’s Manchester by the Sea is certainly sobering, yet is nowhere near as depressing as the initial word on the street would have had us believe. We all know of tragedies that happen all the time, things that we go to sleep at night praying won’t happen to us. Bad things happen to people and not all of it is their own fault — accidents, weather-related calamities, sudden catastrophic health issues. The rule of positive thinking tells us to continue onward like herd animals,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

It Came From The Tube: Black Noon (1971)

Truth be told, I’ve never been too big on Westerns. I don’t know why; I just don’t connect with most of them, or maybe I feel that there’s something missing. Perhaps…Satan?!? Yes, of course we’re heading back to the ‘70s where the Behooved One thrived, even on the small screen. Saddle up for Black Noon (1971), a long forgotten horror/western TV movie that laid the groundwork for some well-regarded horror films.

First airing on The New CBS Friday Night Movies on November 5th, Black Noon had no real competition from the NBC World Premiere Movie or ABC’s Love, American Style, with audiences taking to this insidiously laid back demon oater.

Let’s crack open our telegrammed copy of TV Guide and have a look see:

Black Noon (Friday, 9:30pm, CBS)

A preacher and his wife deal with mysterious forces in a small western town.
See full article at DailyDead »

Wait Until Dark

Is this a genuine classic? I think so. Sure, it’s the old story of the blind girl in jeopardy, but it’s been worked out so well. Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna and Jack Weston shine in a keen adaptation of Frederick Knott’s play, which could be titled, Dial C for Can’t See Nuthin’.

Wait Until Dark

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1967 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 108 min. / Street Date January 24, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna, Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Jack Weston, Julie Herrod, Samantha Jones.

Cinematography Charles Lang

Art Direction George Jenkins

Film Editor Gene Milford

Original Music Henry Mancini

Written by Robert Howard-Carrington & Jane Howard-Carrington

from the play by Frederick Knott

Produced by Mel Ferrer

Directed by Terence Young

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This old-fashioned, semi- stage bound thriller is a real keeper: I must have seen it six times
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Brazil (1944)

Good neighbor policy? Wartime exigencies inspired an intra-hemisphere cultural exchange, with the movies seizing on the new popularity of Latin music. Republic’s contribution gives us the great songs of Ady Barroso and a full soundtrack of his compositions — in a featherweight musical romance, of course.

Brazil

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 91 min. / Street Date December 6, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring Tito Guízar, Virginia Bruce, Edward Everett Horton, Robert Livingston, Veloz and Yolanda, Fortunio Bonanova, Richard Lane, Frank Puglia, Aurora Miranda, Billy Daniel, Dan Seymour, Roy Rogers.

Cinematography Jack A. Marta

Film Editor Fred Allen

Songs Ary Barroso, Hoagy Carmichael

Written by Frank Gill Jr., Laura Kerr, Richard English

Produced by Robert North

Directed by Joseph Santley

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The wartime ‘Good Neighbor Policy’ was a P.R. blitz intended to steer South America toward the U.S. and away from the Axis.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Prince Albert Buys Mom Princess Grace’s Childhood Home in Philadelphia: ‘The House Is Very Special’

Prince Albert Buys Mom Princess Grace’s Childhood Home in Philadelphia: ‘The House Is Very Special’
Prince Albert of Monaco is an American homeowner!

The prince confirms exclusively to People that he recently purchased the childhood home of his mother, actress-turned-royal, Princess Grace.

“It feels good,” he tells People of the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, home. “I’m very happy to have saved this old family home from a near certain death or development.

“We’re still trying to figure out what we’re going to do with it. We’re looking at having it contain some museum exhibit space and maybe use part of it for offices for some of our foundation work.”

Albert will travel to
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Horror disc round-up: Ghoulies, The Burning, Frogs vs Slugs

Nick Aldwinckle Oct 25, 2016

Fancy some horror? We've been taking a look at the discs of Ghoulies, The Burning, Psychomania and more...

“Have you ever heard a frog scream?”, the tag-line to George McCowan’s 1972 ecological horror Frogs (out now on Arrow Blu-ray) should have read. Indeed, for any of you readers that have ever been rudely awoken at 2am by the sound of a traumatised frog being gifted to you by your pet cat/furry psychopath, an amphibian cry of terror is probably the second worst sound there is (behind, of course, Kaiser Chiefs).

See related Will Arnett confirms more Arrested Development Arrow's Stephen Amell stars in Lego Batman 3 Dlc trailer

Not that frogs themselves are inherently evil, though viewing this classic dose of seventies green-themed nastiness might convince you otherwise. Slugs are Ok, too, though we’ll get on to them later on in this month’s vague
See full article at Den of Geek »

Drive-In Dust Offs: X: The Man With The X-ray Eyes

Undisputed Fact: Roger Corman is the greatest B picture producer of all time. His ability to find (and exploit, if we’re being honest) amazing talent and pull together movie miracles on miniscule budgets is nothing short of astonishing. However, it’s often downplayed what a smart, succinct director he was on many a project. X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes (1963) is a stellar example of his talent behind the lens.

Released by Aip in September, X turned a tidy profit on top of its $250,000 budget. Critics were generally kind, but dismissive, calling X well made hokum, essentially. And due to its meager fundage X certainly shows its pedigree through petty set design. But…there’s a kinetic buzz that permeates every frame of X, a swirling colorgasm that bleeds through with Corman’s gift for storytelling. X rises from pulp to a lucid perfection.

Dr. Xavier (Ray Milland
See full article at DailyDead »

Happy 90th Birthday to Roger Corman – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Happy 9oth Birthday to a legend! Roger Corman has directed more than 50 low-budget drive-in classics, produced and/or distributed 450 more, and helped the careers of hundreds of young people breaking into the industry. A partial list: Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Irvin Kershner, Monte Hellman, Peter Bogdanovich, Gail Ann Hurd, James Cameron, Jonathan Kaplan, Joe Dante, Robert Towne. Considering Corman’s own films, Jonathan Demme has stated. “Roger is arguably the greatest independent filmmaker the American film industry has seen and probably ever will see.” And he’s still going strong, currently producing the upcoming actioner Death Race 2050. We Are Movie Geeks has taken a look at Corman’s career and here are what we think are the ten best films that he has directed:

Honorable Mention. The Premature Burial

The Premature Burial (1962) is the ‘odd man out’ among the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Panic in Year Zero!

Hey, we're having a Nuclear family crisis, so load up your shotgun, grab the grenades and head for the hills, stealing what you need as you go. Ray Milland's tense tale of doomsday survival shook up a lot of folks with its endorsement of ruthless violence. Fortunately the worst never happened, allowing us to ask, "Where were you in '62?" Panic in Year Zero! Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1962 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 92 min. / Street Date April 19, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Ray Milland, Jean Hagen, Frankie Avalon, Mary Mitchel, Joan Freeman, Richard Bakalyan, Cinematography Gilbert Warrenton Production Designer Daniel Haller Film Editor William Austin Original Music Les Baxter Written by John Morton, Jay Simms Produced by Samuel Z. Arkoff, Arnold Houghland, James H. Nicholson, Lou Rusoff Directed by Ray Milland

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

There's nothing like good old atom-scare hysteria, which Hollywood dished out as early as 1952's Invasion,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Best Baseball Movies

In the midst of March Madness and with the Kentucky Derby around the corner, the first pitch of baseball season is almost here.

A quote from Field Of Dreams best describes America’s national pastime, “The one constant throughout the years has been baseball.”

To mark the start of the 2016 season, here’s our list of the Best Baseball movies.

The Bad News Bears

Considered by some to be the best baseball movie ever, the film celebrates its 40th anniversary this month (April 7, 1976). In an article from the NY Daily News, one line reads, “It is a movie that someone like the late Philip Seymour Hoffman called his favorite, and one which resonates on many levels today, with all different generations.”

Who are we to argue with greatness?

After skewering all-American subjects such as politics (The Candidate) and beauty pageants (Smile), director Michael Ritchie naturally set his sights on the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: "The Safecracker" (1958) Starring Ray Milland; Warner Archive DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

In addition to being a reliable and fairly popular leading man, Ray Milland also showed some talent as a film director. In total, he directed five movies- among them "The Safecracker", a 1958 low-budget British film noir made by MGM.  The fast-moving story concerns one Colley Dawson (Milland), an expert safecracker who uses his skills for a home security company. He is hired out to design safes for wealthy clients that can be deemed impossible to crack. Although regarded as a genius in his field, Colley is in a deep funk. He's in his fifties, has no home to call his own and still lives with his doting, aging mother (Barbara Everest) in a small home in a nondescript street in London. When Colley lands a major, lucrative contract for his company, his skinflint boss "rewards" him with a bonus of a measly five pound note. Colley's fortunes
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Who Is Gloria Vanderbilt? The Extraordinary Life of Anderson Cooper's Heiress Mother

  • PEOPLE.com
Who Is Gloria Vanderbilt? The Extraordinary Life of Anderson Cooper's Heiress Mother
Anderson Cooper has become famous the world-over for his hard-hitting reporting and tough questions on CNN. But his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, has been famous since she was born. Her father, Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, was from one of the richest families in U.S. history. Her great-grandfather Cornelius Vanderbilt built the New York Central Railroad. After Reginald married his second wife, Gloria Morgan, the couple welcomed Gloria Vanderbilt in 1924. Her birth made headlines. But just 18 months later, her father died of cirrhosis of the liver and she was left in the care of her 19-year-old mother. "She wanted to have fun.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Who Is Gloria Vanderbilt? The Extraordinary Life of Anderson Cooper's Heiress Mother

  • PEOPLE.com
Who Is Gloria Vanderbilt? The Extraordinary Life of Anderson Cooper's Heiress Mother
Anderson Cooper has become famous the world-over for his hard-hitting reporting and tough questions on CNN. But his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, has been famous since she was born. Her father, Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, was from one of the richest families in U.S. history. Her great-grandfather Cornelius Vanderbilt built the New York Central Railroad. After Reginald married his second wife, Gloria Morgan, the couple welcomed Gloria Vanderbilt in 1924. Her birth made headlines. But just 18 months later, her father died of cirrhosis of the liver and she was left in the care of her 19-year-old mother. "She wanted to have fun.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Rita Gam obituary

Versatile actor with notable roles in films such as The Thief and Klute

The actor Rita Gam, who has died aged 87, starred in many films from the 1950s onwards, alongside famous names including Gregory Peck and Jane Fonda. When just 24, with modest stage and television experience, she was cast opposite another leading figure, Ray Milland, for her Hollywood debut in what the publicity described as “the only motion picture of its kind”.

This was The Thief (1952), a cold war spy film devised by the writer-director Russell Rouse in the style of Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights (1931) as a sound film entirely without dialogue. Indeed, Rouse went one better in having no intertitles, the cards using written words to set the scene or supply the dialogue.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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