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An Ideal Partnership - The films of director J. Lee Thompson and actor Charles Bronson - Part 1

When speaking about actor-director partnerships, most people think of the more famous ones, like Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese or Toshiro Mifune and Akira Kurosawa. I have previously looked at the less celebrated collaborators, those who have perhaps not had the same recognition due to their films made more to please the masses than film critics. In this article I will be looking at both an actor and a director that throughout their careers made undoubted classics only to go on to lesser material later in their careers. This is where actor Charles Bronson  and director J.Lee Thompson would find themselves, initially working together on worthwhile productions for companies like Warner Brothers and United Artists until ending up working for Cannon pictures years later....

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Why Nicolas Cage Doesn’t Like the Word ‘Acting’: ‘I Don’t Act, I Feel’

Why Nicolas Cage Doesn’t Like the Word ‘Acting’: ‘I Don’t Act, I Feel’
Nicholas Cage may be known throughout popular culture of his distinctive brand of on-screen wackiness, but for the record, he’s not so sure he’s “over-the-top.”

“You show me where the top is, and I’ll let you know whether I’m over it or not, all right?” Cage said during his interview, alongside “Mom and Dad” director Brian Taylor and fellow stars Selma Blair and Anne Winters, at the Variety Studio Presented by At&T at the Toronto International Film Festival. “I design where the top is.”

Cage called “Mom and Dad” his favorite film he’s worked on in the last decade and referred to Taylor as “my Kurosawa and I am his Mifune,” referring to the famous Japanese director-actor team of Akira Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune. Taylor previously worked with Cage on “Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance.”

“He let me do what I need to do and he knows how to utilize me
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film News Roundup: Annette Bening to Star in Christoph Waltz’s Directorial Debut ‘Georgetown’

Film News Roundup: Annette Bening to Star in Christoph Waltz’s Directorial Debut ‘Georgetown’
In today’s film news roundup, Annette Bening has joined Christoph Waltz and Vanessa Redgrave in “Georgetown,” Lionsgate has acquired U.S. rights to Roland Emmerich’s World War II movie “Midway,” and Film Movement has bought three documentaries.

Casting

Annette Bening has joined Christoph Waltz and Vanessa Redgrave in the crime drama “Georgetown.” The film, which is shooting in Canada, marks Waltz’s directorial debut.

The project, based on the New York Times Magazine article by Franklin Foer, centers on Albrecht Muth (played by Waltz), an eccentric social climber who seduced and married a wealthy older widow, Viola Drath, portrayed by Redgrave. Muth and Drath entered the top political circles as they threw lavish events, with Muth lying extensively about his background — which came to light after Drath was found murdered in 2011 at their home in Georgetown.

Muth was 26 when he married the 71-year-old Drath in 1990. He was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to 50 years
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Emperor in August

This great recent Japanese epic is all but unknown here — and is the kind of adult historical show that we seem incapable of these days. The intense diplomatic storm at the end of WW2 with an Army command willing to sacrifice the nation in a national suicide pact, is given an exciting, thoughtful treatment

The Emperor in August

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

2015 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 136 min. / Street Date August 15, 2017 / Nihon no ichiban nagai hi ketteiban / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Koji Yakusho, Masahiro Motoki, Tsutomu Yamazaki, Shin’ichi Tsutsumi, Tori Matsuzaka, Kikuo Kaneuchi, Misuzu Kanno, Katsumi Kiba.

Cinematography: Takahide Shibanushi

Film Editor: Eugene Harada

Original Music: Harumi Fuki

Based on the novel by Kacutoshi Hando

Produced by Hirotaki Aragaki, Nozumi Enoki

Written and Directed by Masato Harada

How does Twilight Time do it? Every time they offer a foreign title I’ve never heard of, it comes up a winner.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

1941: A Great Comedy For Slim Pickens Day

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Turner Classic Movies will devote an entire day of their “Summer Under the Stars” series to the late, great Louis Burton Lindley Jr. If that name doesn’t sound familiar, well, then just picture the fella riding the bomb like a buckin’ bronco at the end of Dr. Strangelove…, or the racist taskmaster heading up the railroad gang in Blazing Saddles, or the doomed Sheriff Baker, who gets one of the loveliest, most heartbreaking sendoffs in movie history in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Lindley joined the rodeo circuit when he was 13 and soon picked up the name that would follow him throughout the length of his professional career, in rodeo and in movies & TV. One of the rodeo vets got a look at the lank newcomer and told him, “Slim pickin’s. That’s all you’re gonna get in this rodeo.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blu-ray Review – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: 50th Anniversary Special Edition (1966)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: 50th Anniversary Special Edition, 1966.

Directed by Sergio Leone.

Starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach.

Synopsis:

Okay, it’s been 51 years since The Good, the Bad and the Ugly was released, but who’s counting? This new 50th Anniversary Special Edition from Kino Lorber pulls out all the stops with a 4K remastered image, theatrical and extended versions of the film on separate discs, and a big helping of bonus features, including three commentary tracks, deleted scenes, and a bunch of documentary materials.

Some film fans revere Sergio Leone the way others revere Martin Scorsese, Stanley Kubrick, and other directors with more recognizable names. I’ll admit to having arrived at Leone a bit later in life. Sure, I recognized A Fistful of Dollars in Back to the Future Part II, I knew about the longer version of Once Upon a Time in America,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Audiences Are Tired Of Spectacle And Hollywood Doesn't Care -- The Lrm Weekend

  • LRM Online
By David Kozlowski | 4 August 2017

Welcome to Issue #7 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column offering strong opinions about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your feedback or ideas for future columns: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Previous Issues: 7.28.17 | 7.21.17 | 7.14.17 | 7.7.17 | 6.30.17 | 6.23.17

Hey Lrm Weekenders, you might notice a few changes to the column this week. As summer draws to a close we're moving some stuff around and tweaking our content to be a little more opinionated and provocative.

Each of our Lrm writers have super-strong opinions about film, TV, comics, and all of the big franchises and universes. So, going forward Lrm Weekend is going to amp-up our voices a bit more -- and we invite our readers to punch back whenever and wherever you disagree!

Audiences Are Tired Of Spectacle And Hollywood Doesn't Care.
See full article at LRM Online »

Deathstroke Returns, Akira Kurosawa, Zatoichi, And The Man With No Name -- The Lrm Weekend

  • LRM Online
By David Kozlowski | 28 July 2017

Welcome to Issue #6 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Previous Issues: 7.21.17 | 7.14.17 | 7.7.17 | 6.30.17 | 6.23.17

Hey Lrm Weekenders, we survived San Diego Comic-Con 2017 -- did you have a favorite moment? Thor: Ragnarok's latest trailer was a big hit at Lrm (Hulk speaks!). As July comes to a close, we're ramping up for the big movies and TV shows of the late summer through the holiday season.

This week our emphasis is on Akira Kurosawa, the legendary Japanese filmmaker who's works have inspired generations of directors, screenwriters, and actors. Kurosawa's films have been adpapted and remade dozens of times, and we hope that this week's column gives you
See full article at LRM Online »

Feats of Decency: Close-Up on Jean Renoir's "Grand Illusion"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Grand Illusion (1937) is showing July 27 - August 26, 2017 in the United States as part of the retrospective Jean Renoir.Considering Jean Renoir's Grand Illusion today in no small part involves an awareness of status and stature, the most prominent (or maybe just the most intimidating) aspect of which surely being the cherished status the film continues to enjoy in the canon of film history. To this day, it remains a singular achievement, not only as one of Renoir's foundational masterpieces, but also as a film of its time whose contents have remained timeless. Released in 1937 to great acclaim, it bid farewell to one era of European history and warfare as another, far darker one was about to begin; thus, more than the grimly comical The Rules of the Game (made and released two years closer to the brink
See full article at MUBI »

Review: “The Valachi Papers” (1972), Starring Charles Bronson And Lino Ventura; Twilight Time Blu-ray Limited Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Fred Blosser

When Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” emerged as a surprise box-office smash in the early months of 1972, studios and distributors hustled to meet popular demand for more movies about life in the Mob. In New York, a dubbed print of Jean-Pierre Melville’s 1967 film “Le Samourai” was hurriedly retitled and screened as “The Godson” in a masterful example of bait-and-switch marketing. Melville’s chilly, claustrophobic picture about a hit man portrayed by Alain Delon is a fine crime drama, but it had no connection to Coppola’s picture or, for that matter, to any aspect of American Mafia lore at all. “The Valachi Papers,” based on Peter Maas’ bestselling nonfiction book, followed as a more legitimate successor. Rushed through production by Dino De Laurentiis in spring and summer 1972, the film was scripted by Stephen Geller and directed by Terence Young. Shooting largely took place at De Laurentiis’ Rome studio.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Hell in the Pacific

Class-act director John Boorman continues to mix genre grit with European-flavored art cinema, and the result is another winner. Toshiro Mifune and Lee Marvin fight a miniature two-man war when they’re marooned together on the same tiny island. Boorman’s strong direction and Conrad Hall’s knockout cinematography insure a maximum visual impact; it’s great filmmaking all around.

Hell in the Pacific

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date June 27, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Lee Marvin, Toshiro Mifune

Cinematography: Conrad Hall

Art Direction: Anthony Pratt, Masao Yamazaki

Film Editor: Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Lalo Schifrin

Written by Alexander Jacobs, Eric Bercovici story by Reuben Bercovitch

Produced by Reuben Bercovitch, Henry G. Saperstein, Selig J. Seligman

Directed by John Boorman

Former TV director and producer John Boorman barely survived a first feature with the Dave Clark Five, imitating Richard Lester’s success with the Beatles.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This July

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This July will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Saturday, July 1 Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it’s disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara’s The Face of Another (1966).

Tuesday, July 4 Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master
See full article at CriterionCast »

Roland Emmerich confirmed to take the helm on World War II project Midway

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Zehra Phelan

Cannes Film Festival yesterday saw another unveiling. Independence Day director, Roland Emmerich, has officially been confirmed to take the helm of the World War II project, Midway, which he will also co-produce.

The Battle of Midway in the South Pacific was a decisive naval battle in June 1942, six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. The U.S. Navy defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy near Midway Atoll after U.S. codebreakers were able to pinpoint the time and place of the attack. The damage to the Japanese fleet was so extensive that it never recovered and military historians regard the battle as a turning point in the war.

This won’t be the first time The Battle of Midway has been covered on film, back in 1976, Universal’s epic “Midway,” starring Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda, James Coburn, Glenn Ford, Hal Holbrook, Toshiro Mifune,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Independence Day Director Takes on WWII Thriller Midway Next

  • MovieWeb
Independence Day Director Takes on WWII Thriller Midway Next
The Chinese-based Bona Film Group finalized the biggest deal to come out of the Cannes Film Festival, shelling out $80 million for a new World War II thriller Midway, which has Roland Emmerich set to direct. Bona Film Group has acquired worldwide film distribution rights for every market except the U.S., with CAA brokering the deal and representing the U.S. rights. It isn't clear if there is a domestic distributor being lined up quite yet, but this project is said to be Roland Emmerich's next film.

Deadline reports that Wes Tooke (Colony) wrote the script, with Bona Film Group's Yu Dong producing alongside Mark Gordon for The Mark Gordon Company, Matt Jackson and Harald Kloser. The film is an epic telling of the Battle of Midway, a turning point in the Pacific theater of World War II. The story follows the real soldiers and aviators who pulled
See full article at MovieWeb »

Roland Emmerich Directing ‘Midway’ Battle Movie With China’s Bona on Board

Roland Emmerich Directing ‘Midway’ Battle Movie With China’s Bona on Board
Roland Emmerich will direct World War II battle movie “Midway” with China’s Bona Film Group leading the investment for The Mark Gordon Co.

The project was unveiled Tuesday at the Cannes Film Festival. Bona will distribute the film in China and retains worldwide distribution rights, excluding the U.S. CAA brokered the deal and will represent U.S. distribution rights.

The Battle of Midway in the South Pacific was a decisive naval battle in June, 1942, six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. The U.S. Navy defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy near Midway Atoll after U.S. codebreakers were able to pinpoint the time and place of the attack. The damage to the Japanese fleet was so extensive that it never recovered and military historians regard the battle as a turning point in the war.

Related

Watch the New Trailer for Christopher Nolan
See full article at Variety - Film News »

''Should I take a film like Mankatha or a world class film?''

On May 21st, Malayalam Superstar Mohanlal's birthday, a fan urged Premam director Alphonse Puthren to take a movie like Mankatha with Mohanlal as the lead actor. Alphonse Puthren, a die hard fan of Mohanlal replied in style.

He said "To me, Lalettan (Mohanlal) is higher than Clint Eastwood, Toshiro Mifune, Marlon Brando, Al Pacino and Robert De Niro. Should I take a film like Mankaatha or a world class film?"

Earlier Alphonse had said that before shooting the college introduction scene of Nivin in Premam, he had made them watch Mohanlal's opening scene in Spadikam. Alphonse was also the editor...
See full article at Behindwoods »

New to Streaming: ‘The Age of Shadows,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Small Crimes,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Age of Shadows (Kim Jee-woon)

Eyebrows were raised when it was announced that South Korea will submit the as-yet-unreleased espionage thriller The Age of Shadows for Oscar consideration instead of Cannes hits The Handmaiden and The Wailing. Premiering out of competition at the 73rd Venice Film Festival, writer/director Jee-woon Kim’s return to Korean-language cinema after a brief stint in Hollywood with the Schwarzenegger-starrer The Last Stand
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Life of Oharu’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Kinuyo Tanaka, Toshiaki Onoe, Benkei Shiganoya, Tsukie Matsuura | Written by Kenji Mizoguchi, Yoshikata Yoda | Directed by Kenji Mizoguchi

The overarching Buddhist message of Kenji Mizoguchi’s 1952 epic should provide a clue as to the sheer depth of misery our eponymous heroine must endure in her lifetime. Death, and another chance in the next life, seems like her only solace. As Oharu (Kinuyo Tanaka) traverses 17th-Century Japan, at every turn events transpire against her, and glimpses of redemption are swiftly consumed by the shadow of despair.

It actually starts off okay. As a young woman, Oharu is spoiled by the romantic ideals of love. “The nobility makes sport of sincerity,” says her admirer, Katsunosoke (Toshiro Mifune), “turning it into mere wordplay.” He breaks through the caste order and wins her heart. But their love is forbidden and their affair begins the snowball of catastrophe.

There is an essential irony in
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »
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