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1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Scorsese, Spielberg, Keanu Reeves, and More Praise a Titan In Trailer for ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’

21 September 2016 2:07 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There may be no actor who so forcefully brings budding film lovers into world cinema as Toshiro Mifune, the Japanese wild man who redefined period epics and still puts most action stars to shame. Given the (very) rarified place he occupies in cinema, his enshrinement via documentary is an inevitable thing. While Steven Okazaki didn’t get there first, his Mifune: The Last Samurai appears to have done it well.

With the likes of Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and Kiyoshi Kurosawa regular Kôji Yakusho on hand for interviews — as well as narration from Keanu Reeves — the film appears to follow a standard career-and-life walkthrough, admirers and co-workers alike singing his praises while clips and archival photos move us along. (A less-than-glowing review, one of the only published thus far, indicates as much.) So be it: any excuse to revisit his work, even in bite-sized form, is always welcome, and some »

- Nick Newman

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The Truculent Cinema of Robert Aldrich

16 September 2016 10:36 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The quintessential shot in Robert Aldrich’s filmography is that of a close-up, held for a smidgen longer than the normal length one would think appropriate for such a shot. The face the camera is focusing on is usually a signifier of the most central element in Aldrich’s films: tension. Whether it’s melodrama (Autumn Leaves, Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?), war pictures (Too Late the Hero, Attack!), or Westerns, both sober and jocular (Ulzana’s Raid and 4 For Texas, respectively), ideological and external forces wrestle within the psyche that defines Aldrich’s cinema. Metrograph's all-35mm retrospective in New York offers us the opportunity to survey the oeuvre of the auteur who hammered out his cinematic legacy with the vigor of an undoubtedly indignant and irreverent artist. Too Late the Hero (1970)Consistency across genre and modes of filmmaking marks Aldrich as one of the last great studio auteurs, »

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Comanche Station (Einer Gibt Nicht Auf)

12 September 2016 3:06 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Randolph Scott's final 'Ranown' western is a minimalist masterpiece, an unusually gentle story about a great westerner on a forlorn romantic quest. It's also a showcase for the underrated Nancy Gates and Claude Akins, and a pleasure to watch in wide, wide CinemaScope. Comanche Station All-region Blu-ray Explosive Media / Alive 1960 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 74 min. / Street Date July 22, 2016 / Einer Gibt Nicht Auf / available at Amazon.de/ EUR14,99 Starring Randolph Scott, Nancy Gates, Claude Atkins, Skip Homeier, Richard Rust. Cinematography Charles Lawton Jr. Film Editor Edwin H. Bryant Music supervisor Mischa Balaleinikoff Written by Burt Kennedy Produced and Directed by Budd Boetticher

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

One must be careful when ordering Blu-ray discs of Hollywood films from overseas. Foreign distributors license American movies that the studios won't release here, but sometimes they don't have access to good video masters. In a few cases the films being offered are simply being pirated. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Cinema Retro Issue #36 Now Shipping In The UK And Europe

3 September 2016 5:09 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Issue #36, the final issue of Season 12 of Cinema Retro,  has now shipped to subscribers in the UK and Europe. It will ship to all other subscribers from our U.S. office in late September/early October. 

Highlights of this issue include:

Dave Worrall and Lee Pfeiffer celebrate the 50th anniversary of "The Professionals" starring Burt Lancaster, Lee Marvin, Claudia Cardinale, Robert Ryan, Woody Strode and Jack Palance.

*Mark Mawston with a rare exclusive interview with 70's sex siren Linda Hayden

*Cai Ross takes a bite at covering the underrated 1979 version of "Dracula" starring Frank Langella and Laurence Olivier

*John LeMay uncovers the top secret story of the unfilmed "Romance of the Pink Panther" that was to have starred Peter Sellers.

*Peter Cook continues his celebration of matte painting artists

*Tim Greaves uncovers the fascinating career of British "Sex Queen" Mary Millington

*Mark Mawston concludes his interviews with legendary stills photographer Keith Hamshere, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Lee Marvin Died 29 Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

29 August 2016 7:32 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where he began working as a plumber. The acting bug bit after filling in for an ailing summer-stock actor and he studied the art at the New York-based American Theater Wing. Upon making his debut in summer stock, »

- Movie Geeks

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Anniversary Classics Western Weekend, L.A. August 12-14

9 August 2016 3:59 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

This weekend of August 12 through 14th, the Laemmle Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a series of classic western films that will also feature special guests who are scheduled to come and speak about their work in the films. We strongly suggest checking with the theatre’s schedule to see which other guests are added.

From the press release:

Anniversary Classics Western Weekend

August 12-14 at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Beverly Hills

5 Classic Westerns with special guests throughout the weekend

Laemmle’s Anniversary Classics presents our tribute to the sagebrush genre with the Anniversary Classics Western Weekend, a five film round-up ​of some of the most celebrated westerns in movie history. The star-studded lineup features John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, Burt Lancaster, Lee Marvin, Robert Ryan, Kevin Costner, Montgomery Clift, Natalie Wood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef and others. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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RoboCop remake a "stressful experience" its director says

20 July 2016 4:08 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Jul 20, 2016

Director Jose Padilha talks about the "stressful" experience of helming the 2014 RoboCop remake...

Two years ago, Brazilian director Jose Padilha made his big leap to American studio movie-making with RoboCop, the remake of Paul Verhoeven's 1987 classic. Inevitably, the mere notion of the film drew a certain amount of vitriol, and reviews were decidedly mixed.

While we found plenty to appreciate in the movie, it undoubtedly lacked the satirical bite of Verhoeven's original - and the last reel looked as though it may have been the victim of some late reshoots. While Padilha was diplomatic about the movie at the time, it's perhaps significant that he hasn't tackled a major Hollywood film since; rather, he's made the excellent TV series Narcos for Netflix.

Speaking to Screen Daily, however, Padilha admits that making RoboCop was a "stressful experience" that, according to him, was marred by creative disagreement.

“I »

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John Ostrander: American Pop Idol

3 July 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

It’s getting to be the Fourth of July and so it’s apropos to think about this country, what it is, what defines it, what makes it America. Those are somewhat large topics for an essay of 500-700 words (which is where I usually clock in) so we’ll just confine ourselves to one small area.

We deal with pop culture here at ComicMix so let’s think of pop culture icons, those things that we use as symbols of this country. We’re going to focus on one – American movie star/icon John Wayne. Marion Robert Morrison (Wayne’s borth name) made gobs of movies, usually westerns, war movies and detective films. He was a star in the old fashioned Golden Age of Hollywood sense of the word. No one was bigger.

Everybody and his/her brother does an impression of Wayne. My brother does one and I have different versions. »

- John Ostrander

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Shield for Murder

10 June 2016 7:33 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Dirty cops were a movie vogue in 1954, and Edmond O'Brien scores as a real dastard in this overachieving United Artists thriller. Dreamboat starlet Marla English is the reason O'Brien's detective kills for cash, and then keeps killing to stay ahead of his colleagues. And all to buy a crummy house in the suburbs -- this man needs career counseling. Shield for Murder Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1954 / B&W / 1:75 widescreen / 82 min. / Street Date June 21, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Edmond O'Brien, Marla English, John Agar, Emile Meyer, Carolyn Jones, Claude Akins, Herbert Butterfield, Hugh Sanders, William Schallert, Robert Bray, Richard Deacon, David Hughes, Gregg Martell, Stafford Repp, Vito Scotti. Cinematography Gordon Avil Film Editor John F. Schreyer Original Music Paul Dunlap Written by Richard Alan Simmons, John C. Higgins from the novel by William P. McGivern <Produced by Aubrey Schenck, (Howard W. Koch) Directed by Edmond O'Brien, Howard W. Koch

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Here's the kind of '50s movie we love, an ambitious, modest crime picture that for its time had an edge. In the 1950s our country was as blind to the true extent of police corruption as it was to organized crime. Movies about bad cops adhered to the 'bad apple' concept: it's only crooked individuals that we need to watch out for, never the institutions around them. Thanks to films noir, crooked cops were no longer a film rarity, even though the Production Code made movies like The Asphalt Jungle insert compensatory scenes paying lip service to the status quo: an imperfect police force is better than none. United Artists in the 1950s helped star talent make the jump to independent production, with the prime success stories being Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. But the distribution company also funded proven producers capable of putting out smaller bread 'n' butter movies that could prosper if costs were kept down. Edward Small, Victor Saville, Levy-Gardner-Laven. Aubrey Schenck and Howard C. Koch produced as a team, and for 1954's Shield for Murder Koch co-directed, sharing credit with the film's star, Edmond O'Brien. The show is a smart production all the way, a modestly budgeted 'B' with 'A' ambitions. O'Brien was an industry go-getter trying to channel his considerable talent in new directions. His leading man days were fading but he was in demand for parts in major films like The Barefoot Contessa. The producers took care with their story too. Writers Richard Alan Simmons and John C. Higgins had solid crime movie credits. Author William P. McGivern wrote the novel behind Fritz Lang's The Big Heat as well as Rogue Cop and Odds Against Tomorrow. All of McGivern's stories involve crooked policemen or police corruption. Shield for Murder doesn't tiptoe around its subject matter. Dirty cop Detective Lt. Barney Nolan (O'Brien) kills a hoodlum in an alley to steal $25,000 of mob money. His precinct boss Captain Gunnarson (Emile Meyer) accepts Barney's version of events and the Asst. D.A. (William Schallert) takes the shooting as an open and shut case. Crime reporter Cabot (Herbert Butterfield) has his doubts, and lectures the squad room about the abuse of police power. Barney manages to placate mob boss Packy Reed (Hugh Sanders), but two hoods continue to shadow him. Barney's plan for the money was to buy a new house and escape the rat race with his girlfriend, nightclub cashier Patty Winters (Marla English). But a problem surfaces in the elderly deaf mute Ernst Sternmueller (David Hughes), a witness to the shooting. Barney realizes that his only way forward is to kill the old man before he can tell all to Det. Mark Brewster (John Agar), Barney's closest friend. Once again one of society's Good Guys takes a bite of the forbidden apple and tries to buck the system. Shield for Murder posits an logical but twisted course of action for a weary defender of the law who wants out. Barney long ago gave up trying to do anything about the crooks he can't touch. The fat cat Packy Reed makes the big money, and all Barney wants is his share. Barney's vision of The American Dream is just the middle-class ideal, the desirable Patty Winters and a modest tract home. He's picked it out - it sits partway up a hill in a new Los Angeles development, just finished and already furnished. Then the unexpected witness shows up and everything begins to unravel; Barney loses control one step at a time. He beats a mob thug (Claude Akins) half to death in front of witnesses. When his pal Mark Brewster figures out the truth, Barney has to use a lot of his money to arrange a getaway. More mob trouble leads to a shoot-out in a high school gym. The idea may have been for the star O'Brien to coach actors John Agar and Marla English to better performances. Agar is slightly more natural than usual, but still not very good. The gorgeous Ms. English remains sweet and inexpressive. After several unbilled bits, the woman often compared to Elizabeth Taylor was given "introducing" billing on the Shield for Murder billing block. Her best-known role would be as The She-Creature two years later, after which she dropped out to get married. Co-director O'Brien also allows Emile Meyer to go over the top in a scene or two. But the young Carolyn Jones is a standout as a blonde bargirl, more or less expanding on her small part as a human ashtray in the previous year's The Big Heat. Edmond O'Brien is occasionally a little to hyper, but he's excellent at showing stress as the trap closes around the overreaching Barney Nolan. Other United Artists budget crime pictures seem a little tight with the outdoors action -- Vice Squad, Witness to Murder, Without Warning -- but O'Brien and Koch's camera luxuriates in night shoots on the Los Angeles streets. This is one of those Blu-rays that Los Angelenos will want to freeze frame, to try to read the street signs. There is also little downtime wasted in sidebar plot detours. The gunfight in the school gym, next to an Olympic swimming pool, is an action highlight. The show has one enduring sequence. With the force closing in, Barney rushes back to the unfinished house he plans to buy, to recover the loot he's buried next to its foundation. Anybody who lived in Southern California in the '50s and '60s was aware of the massive suburban sprawl underway, a building boom that went on for decades. In 1953 the La Puente hills were so rural they barely served by roads; the movie The War of the Worlds considered it a good place to use a nuclear bomb against invading Martians. By 1975 the unending suburbs had spread from Los Angeles, almost all the way to Pomona. Barney dashes through a new housing development on terraced plots, boxy little houses separated from each other by only a few feet of dirt. There's no landscaping yet. Even in 1954 $25,000 wasn't that much money, so Barney Nolan has sold himself pretty cheaply. Two more latter-day crime pictures would end with ominous metaphors about the oblivion of The American Dream. In 1964's remake of The Killers the cash Lee Marvin kills for only buys him a patch of green lawn in a choice Hollywood Hills neighborhood. The L.A.P.D. puts Marvin out of his misery, and then closes in on another crooked detective in the aptly titled 1965 thriller The Money Trap. The final scene in that movie is priceless: his dreams smashed, crooked cop Glenn Ford sits by his designer swimming pool and waits to be arrested. Considering how well things worked out for Los Angeles police officers, Edmond O'Brien's Barney Nolan seems especially foolish. If Barney had stuck it out for a couple of years, the new deal for the L.A.P.D. would have been much better than a measly 25 grand. By 1958 he'd have his twenty years in. After a retirement beer bash he'd be out on the road pulling a shiny new boat to the Colorado River, like all the other hardworking cops and firemen enjoying their generous pensions. Policemen also had little trouble getting house loans. The joke was that an L.A.P.D. cop might go bad, but none of them could be bribed. O'Brien directed one more feature, took more TV work and settled into character parts for Jack Webb, Frank Tashlin, John Ford, John Frankenheimer and finally Sam Peckinpah in The Wild Bunch, where he was almost unrecognizable. Howard W. Koch slowed down as a director but became a busy producer, working with Frank Sinatra for several years. He eventually co-produced Airplane! The Kl Studio Classics Blu-ray of Shield for Murder is a good-looking B&W scan, framed at a confirmed-as-correct 1:75 aspect ratio. The picture is sharp and detailed, and the sound is in fine shape. The package art duplicates the film's original no-class sell: "Dame-Hungry Killer-Cop Runs Berserk! The first scene also contains one of the more frequently noticed camera flubs in film noir -- a really big boom shadow on a nighttime alley wall. Kino's presentation comes with trailers for this movie, Hidden Fear and He Ran All the Way. On a scale of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor, Shield for Murder Blu-ray rates: Movie: Good Video: Very Good Sound: Excellent Supplements: Trailers for Shield for Murder, Hidden Fear, He Ran All the Way Deaf and Hearing Impaired Friendly? N0; Subtitles: None Packaging: Keep case Reviewed: June 7, 2016 (5115murd)

Visit DVD Savant's Main Column Page Glenn Erickson answers most reader mail: dvdsavant@mindspring.com

Text © Copyright 2016 Glenn Erickson

»

- Glenn Erickson

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AFI Honoree John Williams Looks Back on Six Decades of Iconic Themes

9 June 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Star Wars.” “E.T.” “Jaws.” “Indiana Jones.” “Superman.” “Harry Potter.”

Admit it: You can’t think of any one of those films without hearing the score in your head.

John Williams, who wrote all those classic themes [and dozens more] will receive the American Film Institute’s Life Achievement Award on June 9 from frequent collaborator Steven Spielberg. It will be the first such honor given to a composer in the 44-year history of the award.

“This man’s gifts echo, quite literally, through all of us, around the world and across generations,” says AFI president-ceo Bob Gazzale. “There’s not one person who hasn’t heard this man’s work, who hasn’t felt alive because of it. That’s the ultimate impact of an artist.”

Over six decades in Hollywood, Williams has written some of the most memorable music in movie history. His 100-plus features have earned 50 Academy Award nominations [making him the most-nominated living person] and he’s won five times. »

- Jon Burlingame

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Best Military Movies To Watch on June 6, D-Day

6 June 2016 3:44 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

June 6, 1944. Today marks the 72nd anniversary of D-Day.

On June 7th, Paramount Home Media Distribution will release director Michael Bay’s remarkable 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers Of Benghazi.

Hailed as “powerful” (Kyle Smith, New York Post), “engrossing” (Soren Andersen, Seattle Times) and “full of explosive action” (Dan Casey, Nerdist), the film arrives on Blu-ray Combo Pack, DVD and On Demand this Tuesday. (Review)

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers Of Benghazi tells the incredible true story of six elite ex-military operators who fought to protect the CIA against overwhelming odds when terrorists attacked a U.S. diplomatic compound on September 11, 2012. The film stars John Krasinski (TV’s “The Office”), James Badge Dale (World War Z) and Pablo Schreiber (TV’s “Orange is the New Black”), and is based on the nonfiction novel 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi by New York Times best-selling author Mitchell Zuckoff with »

- Movie Geeks

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Jim Jarmusch Talks ‘Paterson,’ His Love for Poetry & Hip-Hop, Tilda Swinton, and Being Grateful

23 May 2016 9:28 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Legendary American independent filmmaker Jim Jarmusch has been a frequent visitor to the Cannes Film Festival ever since winning the Camera d’Or for Stranger Than Paradise in 1984. He took the Grand Jury prize in 2005 for Broken Flowers but has never managed to nab the Big One. His latest film, Paterson, which premiered last week in competition here, is the story of a bus driver (played by Adam Driver) named Paterson who lives in Paterson NJ, walks his wife’s bulldog, Marvin, and writes poems in his spare time. We sat down with the great silver-haired Son of Lee Marvin to talk hip-hop, Tilda Swinton, and the poetry of everyday things.

Some critics have called this your most personal film. How do would you respond to a statement like that?

I don’t know. With our last film, Only Lovers Left Alive, everyone said “Aha! His most personal film!” I don’t know. »

- Rory O'Connor

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Preacher episode 1 review: Pilot

23 May 2016 12:19 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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The Preacher pilot, directed by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, arrives on AMC brimming with confidence and violence...

This review contains spoilers.

1.1 Pilot

Like a lot of teenagers, I drifted away from comic books. The expense got to be too much, and since I never got a subscription to any comic and only bought them at the store, I was always missing issues, which made it difficult to follow along with the plots. However, when I was in high school, one of our classes had a reading hour on Friday, and a friend of mine brought comic books. From the moment I opened up Preacher, I was hooked, and I made sure that every Friday, he'd bring other issues of it for me to read.

In a lot of ways, it's the perfect comic for a teenage boy; funny, perverse, violent, sacrilegious, and obsessed with the removal of male genitalia. »

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Shane Black Talks 'Doc Savage' and 'The Predator'

17 May 2016 12:19 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Director Shane Black certainly has a lot on his plate these days. Not only is his latest film, The Nice Guys, set to hit theater soon, but he already has two big properties ready to follow that one up. The first is The Predator, a film that's set to revitalize the long-dormant franchise. Also on the horizon is a film chronicling the adventures of the decades-old pulp hero, Doc Savage.

Here's what Black had to say about The Predator when asked if the sort of "macho" culture that it came out of was still relevant in todays' world.

"I think that the only thing that the 1980s macho context really has to add is that back then, the actors tended to be more… I think more 'men,' and less 'boys.' For instance, back in the day, the ones who filled my head as I grew up: Lee Marvin, »

- Joseph Medina

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In a Lonely Place

29 April 2016 5:29 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

It's a different Bogart -- a character performance in a Nicholas Ray noir about distrust anxiety in romance. Gloria Grahame is the independent woman who must withhold her commitment... until a murder can be sorted out. Which will crack first, the murder case or the relationship? In A Lonely Place Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 810 1950 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 93 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date May 10, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Humphrey Bogart, Gloria Grahame, Frank Lovejoy, Carl Benton Reid, Art Smith, Jeff Donnell, Martha Stewart, Robert Warwick, Morris Ankrum, William Ching, Steven Geray, Hadda Brooks. Cinematography Burnett Guffey Film Editor Viola Lawrence Original Music George Antheil Written by Andrew Solt, Edmund H. North from a story by Dorothy B. Hughes Produced by Robert Lord Directed by Nicholas Ray

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Which Humphrey Bogart do you like best? By 1950 he had his own production company, Santana, with a contract for release through Columbia pictures. »

- Glenn Erickson

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How superhero movies embraced wild west frontier libertarianism

28 April 2016 9:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Captain America: Civil War isn’t the only comic-book movie to champion the strong individual over unreliable authority figures when it comes to sorting good from bad. The tactic worked well before – in westerns

Link Appleyard might be the archetypal cowardly wild west lawman. John Ford’s classic 1962 western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance presents the gutless town marshal, played by Andy Devine, as a legacy of the cracks in the system that require strong men like John Wayne’s steely Tom Doniphon to deliver true justice in a time of chaos. When Lee Marvin’s bestial Valance rolls into town to bully greenhorn lawyer James Stewart, it is not the bumbling Appleyard who steps up to help him. Instead, it is the indestructible Wayne, a superhero in everything but name and outfit, who delivers the bullet that saves Stewart’s bacon.

Related: Captain America: Civil War – conflicted heroes »

- Ben Child

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How superhero movies embraced wild west frontier libertarianism

28 April 2016 9:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Captain America: Civil War isn’t the only comic-book movie to champion the strong individual over unreliable authority figures when it comes to sorting good from bad. The tactic worked well before – in westerns

Link Appleyard might be the archetypal cowardly wild west lawman. John Ford’s classic 1962 western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance presents the gutless town marshal, played by Andy Devine, as a legacy of the cracks in the system that require strong men like John Wayne’s steely Tom Doniphon to deliver true justice in a time of chaos. When Lee Marvin’s bestial Valance rolls into town to bully greenhorn lawyer James Stewart, it is not the bumbling Appleyard who steps up to help him. Instead, it is the indestructible Wayne, a superhero in everything but name and outfit, who delivers the bullet that saves Stewart’s bacon.

Related: Captain America: Civil War – conflicted heroes »

- Ben Child

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Exclusive interview with Bastille Day director James Watkins

21 April 2016 12:45 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With the release of Bastille Day only a day away, Flickering Myth’s Scott J. Davis was lucky enough to sit down with the film’s director James Watkins to discuss the action thriller.

Watkins, who made his name with dark thrillers such as The Woman in Black and Eden Lake, was always keen to do an action film such as this one, telling FM: “Lots of influences from 70’s movies: French Connection obviously in Idris’ character, that kind of maverick, no-nonsense, take-no-prisoners-cop. There’s Popeye Doyle, there’s Dirty Harry, Lee Marvin in Point Blank was a massive reference… And 48 Hours also in terms of their relationship. I wanted to action to play real but there were lighter moments. I told Idris to watch Midnight Run!”

The director also spoke about filming in Paris, the influence of the Bourne movies on the film, and also mentioned what he sees »

- Scott J. Davis

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James Watkins interview: Bastille Day, Idris Elba, Statham

21 April 2016 4:21 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Director James Watkins chats about Bastille Day, working with Idris Elba and the difficulties of shooting smaller-budget action...

James Watkins burst onto the filmmaking scene in 2008, with his Michael Fassbender-starring thriller Eden Lake. He followed this with more scariness in 2012, helming the big screen version of The Woman In Black with Daniel Radcliffe at its heart.

His latest movie is Bastille Day,a pacey action flick that casts Idris Elba as a CIA agent and Richard Madden as a morally murky pickpocket who winds up at the centre of a terrorist attack in Paris. The two are thrust together on a quest to stop the next strike, with plenty of barbed banter and thrilling chases cropping up as they attempt to do so.

Shortly after seeing the film, I shared 15 minutes with Mr Watkins in a posh London hotel room. He was a lovely chap, as »

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Dillinger

18 April 2016 9:23 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Guns! Guns! Guns! John Milius' rootin' tootin' bio of the most famous of the '30s bandits has plenty of good things to its credit, especially its terrific, funny cast, topped by the unlikely star Warren Oates. The battles between Dillinger's team of all-star bank robbers and Ben Johnson's G-Man aren't neglected, as Milius savors every gun recoil and Tommy gun blast. Dillinger Blu-ray + DVD Arrow Video U.S. 1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 107 min. / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Warren Oates, Ben Johnson, Michelle Phillips, Cloris Leachman, Harry Dean Stanton, Geoffrey Lewis, John Ryan, Richard Dreyfuss, Steve Kanaly, John Martino, Roy Jenson, Frank McRae. Cinematography Jules Brenner Special Effects A.D. Flowers, Cliff Wenger Edited by Fred R. Feitshans, Jr. Original Music Barry De Vorzon Produced by Buzz Feitshans Written and Directed by John Milius

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

There it was in the dentist's office, an article in either »

- Glenn Erickson

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