IMDb > Carole Lombard > News
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

15 items from 2015

Manhattan, 2.04, “Overlord”

3 November 2015 11:45 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Manhattan, Season 2, Episode 4, “Overlord”

Written by Alexander Woo

Directed by Christopher Misiano

Airs Tuesdays at 9pm (Et) on Wgn

“If it helps to pretend you’re me, pretend. It’s what I do.” Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer

The first three episodes of Manhattan‘s second season have largely focused on the disappearance of Frank Winter. While they have all been outstanding, the narrative has felt a little fragmented without all the characters on the Hill together. In “Overlord,” the story is still split between the goings on at Los Alamos and the fate of Frank, but it ultimately brings the implosion team—and the narrative—back together in a satisfying fashion.

“Overlord” refers to the code name for the Allies’ D-Day invasion at Normandy, which serves as the backdrop for this episode. But it’s also a reference to science chief J. Robert Oppenheimer, who experiences a dangerous case of cold feet, »

- A.R. Wilson

Permalink | Report a problem

Leigh Day on TCM: From Southern Belle in 'Controversial' Epic to Rape Victim in Code-Buster

18 August 2015 7:35 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Vivien Leigh ca. late 1940s. Vivien Leigh movies: now controversial 'Gone with the Wind,' little-seen '21 Days Together' on TCM Vivien Leigh is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 18, '15, as TCM's “Summer Under the Stars” series continues. Mostly a stage actress, Leigh was seen in only 19 films – in about 15 of which as a leading lady or star – in a movie career spanning three decades. Good for the relatively few who saw her on stage; bad for all those who have access to only a few performances of one of the most remarkable acting talents of the 20th century. This evening, TCM is showing three Vivien Leigh movies: Gone with the Wind (1939), 21 Days Together (1940), and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Leigh won Best Actress Academy Awards for the first and the third title. The little-remembered film in-between is a TCM premiere. 'Gone with the Wind' Seemingly all »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem

American dreams by Anne-Katrin Titze

14 August 2015 1:15 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Hitchcock/Truffaut director Kent Jones between Mistress America's Greta Gerwig and Noah Baumbach Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

How Robert Mitchum and a Twentieth Century Carole Lombard are the ones to copy, not Marlon Brando, the difference in shooting dance for Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, Eric Rohmer framing, Brian De Palma in Venice, the rhythms of Whit Stillman and Todd Solondz, Frances Ha and the Sixties, the importance of physical choreography and working together to create the style, were a part of the post screening discussion between Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig with New York Film Festival Director and Selection Committee Chair, Kent Jones.

After the sneak preview screening of Mistress America, held at the Film Society of Lincoln Center last night, Kent proclaimed: "Before anything else - Happy Birthday, Alfred Hitchcock!"

Mistress America co-screenwriter and star Greta Gerwig: "As an actor my entry point is always through language. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

Permalink | Report a problem

Interview: Greta Gerwig Talks Her Screwball Comedy ‘Mistress America,’ Working With Todd Solondz & More

11 August 2015 12:44 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

From mumblecore breakout star to indie darling, actress Greta Gerwig has had a charmed career thus far. But while her mastery of comedic awkwardness has turned her into a modern day Rosalind Russell, (or maybe, as in her words, Carole Lombard), the actress is also separating herself from her peers by driving her own narrative: writing, directing and creating her own roles. Gerwig has been writing since the beginning (she co-wrote "Hannah Takes The Stairs" and some of the early mumblecore works), but its her inspired efforts with frequent collaborator and partner Noah Baumbach that have really started to cook and turn into some contemporary classics. Their first co-writing collaboration was "Frances Ha," and their hilarious follow-up, the screwball comedy "Mistress America" is somewhat of a sister movie that Gerwig likens to a follow-up album to a successful first effort. Read More: Watch: Sarah Polley Interviews Greta Gerwig About »

- Rodrigo Perez

Permalink | Report a problem

Mistress America | Review

10 August 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Sister, My Sister: Baumbach’s Energetic Return to Facades of NYC

The latest in Noah Baumbach’s prolific slew of projects, Mistress America is the follow-up collaboration between the director and actress/muse Greta Gerwig. Though it isn’t as fine-tuned and charmingly buoyant as their 2012 feature Frances Ha, it’s an intelligently droll counterpart to the pleasant yet painstakingly glossy While We’re Young (which reaches theatrical release this coming spring). Witty and well-written, Baumbach’s tone is influenced by a slew of transmogrifying 1980s American films, though the dialogue heavy banter recalls everyone from Howard Hawks to Woody Allen sidestepping on slapstick. Though Baumbach isn’t covering new ground, his post-collegiate privileged characters still inveigled with the paralyzing ennui of adult prospects that graced his lovely 1995 debut, Kicking & Screaming, he hasn’t lost his knack for portraying disillusioned lives lost hopelessly in their own sea of problems.

Entering Columbia as a college freshman, »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem

Close-Up on "To Be or Not To Be": Lubitsch Answers the Question of 'What's So Funny About the Nazis?'

27 July 2015 4:55 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. To Be or Not to Be is playing on Mubi in the Us through August 28.In 2002, the American Film Institute selected To Be or Not to Be as one of the 50 funniest American movies of all time. In March of 1942, when the film was initially released, most critics weren't laughing. A movie lampooning Adolf Hitler may have been acceptable a few years prior (see, for example, Charlie Chaplin's The Great Dictator [1940], though even then Chaplin began to regret his decision after learning more of the Nazis' "homicidal insanity"). But by 1942, Pearl Harbor had been attacked, America had entered World War II, and, to make matters even more dour, the star of To Be or Not to Be, the radiant Carole Lombard, had died in a plane crash less than two months before the premiere. All told, those »

- Jeremy Carr

Permalink | Report a problem

Kristin Chenoweth Receives a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

24 July 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

These days, Kristin Chenoweth is everywhere — on film and TV, in concert and on the Broadway stage for eight shows a week as the Tony-nominated romantic lead Lily Garland/Mildred Plotka in Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of “On the Twentieth Century.”

“This is a commitment, what I’m doing and (what) all of my fellow Broadway artists (are doing),” says the petite Oklahoman (she’s all of 4 feet, 11 inches tall) of her role as the ugly duckling piano accompanist who transforms into a swan movie star. “It’s a marathon, like being an Olympic athlete. It’s also a gift.”

And Chenoweth’s fans know it. The second she appears onstage, the audience thunderously applauds. And then comes that unmistakable voice: bigger than she is — perfect in pitch, tone and breath — from ballad to belt.

“Kristin is enormously bright and kind,” says Matthew Broderick, who starred opposite Chenoweth in »

- Thelma Adams

Permalink | Report a problem

The 20 Best Female-Driven Comedies

16 July 2015 3:35 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

"Trainwreck," the new Amy Schumer/Judd Apatow movie, examines the plight of one snarly woman as she exits her familiar world of sexual freedom and hangovers for a detour into serious romance. Though several eye-popping cameos and supporting performances buttress the film, Schumer's performance is the acting triumph of "Trainwreck." Without her shaky conscience and burgeoning sense of fulfillment, the movie's conventional story might feel staid. Thankfully, it's anything but. Schumer's performance marks a welcome addition to cinema's long line of strident, hilarious female protagonists. We're celebrating that lineage with a list: the 20 best female-driven comedies ever. Some are old and some are new, but all are marked by a degree of cosmopolitan fun and nerviness -- and the occasional slap from Cher.  20. "How to Marry a Millionaire" We remember Lauren Bacall as a glamor girl with a damning grimace, but let's start revising that narrative to include her chops as a comic force. »

- Louis Virtel

Permalink | Report a problem

Top Ten Tuesday – The Best Substitutes for Downton Abbey

26 May 2015 7:44 AM, PDT | | See recent news »

By rights I should hate the English. Seriously, my background is almost entirely Scots and Irish. I grew up hearing about the troubles the English gave to the Scots and Irish, both in school and from my parents.

Yet I do not, I love the English. How can I hate a country that gave us not only Monty Python but also Benny Hill and the Carry On Films? How can I bear any ill will to a country that gave us writers of the caliber of Ramsey Campbell, Brian Aldiss, Michael Moorcock and J. G Ballard? How can anyone hate a country that not only prizes eccentric behavior but encourages it? Take Mr. Kim Newman for instance, a brilliant writer whose work appears regularly in Video WatchDog and Videoscope Mr. Newman dresses himself, has his hair and mustache styled and speaks in the manner of someone from the 19th Century! »

- Sam Moffitt

Permalink | Report a problem

Daily | Maysles, Telaroli, Hoberman

7 May 2015 9:53 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Online from the new issue of Film Comment are pieces on Albert Maysles, Martín Rejtman and Jang Jin, plus Matías Piñeiro on Carole Lombard in Alfred Hitchcock's Mr. & Mrs. Smith and more. Also in today's roundup: A crowd-funding campaign for Orson Welles, a conversation with Gina Telaroli, a profile of J. Hoberman, wisdom from Frederick Wiseman, a new book on Errol Morris, another one by Werner Herzog, a review of Thom Andersen's The Thoughts That Once We Had, "Genetic Engineering, Slavery, and Immortality in Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner"—and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem

The Noteworthy: 6 May 2015

6 May 2015 4:02 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The poster for Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Cemetery of Splendour, bound for Cannes.Great news for fans of Louis Ck the actor and the director: the comedian-auteur is gearing up to make a new feature film, titled I'm a Cop.Producer Bero Beyer has been appointed the new General and Artistic Director of the International Film Festival Rotterdam Above: A vintage nitrate release print of John M. Stahl's Leave Her to Heaven. The print screened at the first ever Nitrate Picture Show at the George Eastman House last weekend. You'll hear more about this wonderful festival soon on the Notebook.A new issue of Film Comment is out, with many articles available online.That's Stanley Kubrick, above, talking to Jeremy Bernstein in 1965.At Reverse Shot, Nick Pinkerton considers under-appreciated French New Waver Luc Moullet's A Girl Is a Gun.Author F.X. Feeney has not one but two videos celebrating »

- Notebook

Permalink | Report a problem

Movie Poster of the Week: “You’ll Never Get Rich” and The Art of the Dance Movie Poster

21 March 2015 11:36 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: French poster by Boris Grinsson for You’ll Never Get Rich (Sidney Lanfield, USA, 1941).In the new edition of Film Comment, out this week, I write about British airbrush artist Philip Castle and his iconic poster for Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. The other man behind that poster, aside from Kubrick himself, was producer, director and writer Mike Kaplan who, at the time, was Kubrick’s marketing guru.Kaplan, who has been collecting movie posters, as well as art directing them, for 35 years, is a tireless proselytizer for the art form and his latest project is a labor of love and a pure delight. Gotta Dance! The Art of the Dance Movie Poster, a book he wrote and curated, was born out of a touring exhibition of his own personal collection that he has been exhibiting around the country for the past few years. Its latest stop is »

- Adrian Curry

Permalink | Report a problem

Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem

Movie Poster of the Week: “The Private Life of Henry VIII” and Charles Laughton in Posters

21 February 2015 6:00 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: Us three-sheet poster for The Private Life of Henry VIII (Alexander Korda, UK, 1933).

The great Charles Laughton may not have been the prettiest of movie stars, but he had a presence that many matinee idols would have killed for (as the current retrospective running at Film Forum will attest). In an era in which glamor was everything, studio marketers may have struggled with how to present Laughton’s unconventional looks and his larger-than-life portrayals of larger-than-life characters (so many monsters, murderers,  tyrants, or simply overbearing fathers) to the public. In most of the posters for his most famous film, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), he is all but a silhouette, a spoiler alert to his monstrous transformation as Quasimodo. And in some posters for The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), the film for which he won his first Oscar, Henry is made to look more like the Hans Holbein »

- Adrian Curry

Permalink | Report a problem

Sundance Film Review: ‘Mistress America’

25 January 2015 2:13 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Midway through Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig’s “Mistress America,” the movie arrives at a long, zany setpiece so inspired and brilliantly sustained that it alone would be worth the price of admission (or the wait in a long Sundance queue). But there’s much else to admire in “Mistress,” which finds the crown prince of New York intellectual self-loathing and his ebullient co-writer/muse returning to the terrain of their 2012 “Frances Ha” — intense female friendships and eager young people trying to find their places in the world — while pushing even closer to full-tilt screwball farce. One of Baumbach’s warmest and purely funniest films, this Fox Searchlight pickup may lack the name cast of the filmmaker’s other 2015 release, “While We’re Young,” but positioned properly it could reach Baumbach’s broadest audience since 2005’s “The Squid and the Whale.”

If nothing else, “Mistress America” confirms Gerwig as one of the great, »

- Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

15 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners