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Video Essay. Being the Boss: Jerry Lewis, Reassembled

Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi JerrythonThe boardroom sequence from The Errand Boy (1961) is one of Jerry Lewis’s finest achievements and the video offered here is an effort to highlight some of the features that make it so special. When analysing a film scene, I often find it a useful exercise to import the sequence into iMovie and play with the footage, perhaps altering the soundtrack or cutting it differently. I find this hands-on approach helps me to get to know the sequence more intimately, to discover some of the myriad choices taken in its production and qualities that might otherwise escape notice. In the case of the Lewis routine (which I have written about briefly before1, but wanted to revisit for a forthcoming book about sketch comedy), I found myself going over certain actions that Lewis performs to the Count Basie music, running them backwards and forwards in iMovie,
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Jerry Lewis – Satirical Impressions in Pantomimicry

Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython. Writer, director, star of stage, screen and television, humanitarian, producer, and total filmmaker—Jerry Lewis was all of the above. For the first six years of his career he was also a professional lip syncher. At age twelve, desperate to follow his parents on stage, Jerry began developing a “record act.” A staple on the lower rungs of the Borscht Belt, burlesque, vaudeville, and nightclubs, record acts (a.k.a. dummy acts) were cheap and easy: they consisted of a performer or performers miming away to recordings. Always considered pretty corny, they were the poor stepchildren on the theatrical bills, but there were plenty of budding comics who broke into show business that way. Jerry Van Dyke was another newbie who started his career doing record acts, and much later Andy Kaufman would put his own spin on it mouthing only
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Rushes. Jay-z by Duvernay & the Safdies, World Poll, Tweeting "Notting Hill"

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Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Recommended VIEWINGJay-z's great taste in directors continues with the Safdie brothers, who both lent a deft hand for the "Marcy Me" video, which feels like a thematic addendum to their own film Good Time.Ava Duvernay (Selma) also directed this star-studded epic music video for Jay-z's "Family Feud".Who doesn't love pulp movie maestro Samuel Fuller? In the event of their active retrospective of his work, the Cinémathèque française provides this ecstatic montage of a few of his finest films.Recommended READINGPerhaps you missed Sarah Nicole Prickett's incisive recaps of Twin Peaks: The Return for Artforum? If that's the case, you can catch up here. Prickett has shared her final take on Episode 18 and the series overall, and it was well worth the wait. From Alejandro G. Iñárritu to Jia Zhangke—the January/February
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A Mubi Jerrython

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython.Jerry Lewis, one of the most successful and volatile of popular artists, and something of a personal hero, died late in the summer at the age of 91. After revisiting 32 films in preparation for a long article published to coincide with his 90th birthday, I had already seriously contemplated the idea of him dying. The elderly Jerry who appeared in the morning television segments that I consumed vociferously while writing the essay was not the Jerry starring in the glut of movies I was poring over. His vitality lasted through middle-age and into his advanced years, seemingly with little resistance despite three or four lifetimes worth of illnesses, addictions, and injuries. But finally, senescence had ensnared him; I remember being particularly moved by his admission that what he missed most was his ability to stand up straight and walk. Writing about Lewis,
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Jerry and the Prefab People: "Hardly Working" and Americana

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython. In Hardly Working, Jerry Lewis, as Bo Hooper, is Making America Goyish Again. Made in between The Day the Clown Cried and Jerry’s Telethons for Muscular Dystrophy, this is Jerry’s first (seen) attempt to wed issues of Jewish /outsider identity, and Americana with the desire for artistic or political legacy. Opening with a montage (of other movies): Jerry toots his horn in a greatest moments' super edit. Bracketing the sequences is the typewriting scene in Who’s Minding the Store?. Though it is not a film Jerry directed, it is the only clip shown piecemeal that conspicuously shows craft. The poetry of his comedy, seemingly effortless, credited to hard work.This gaze extending into the past introduces an artistic defense that Jerry makes for himself. In a late career pivot Jerry Lewis (re)directs himself in Hardly Working as a less hapless,
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Something Only He Can Give: A Few Thoughts on Jerry Lewis and Television

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython.Jerry Lewis's rise to stardom almost perfectly coincides with the rise of television as the dominant entertainment medium of the post-war era. 1946, the first year a somewhat consistent network schedule emerged in the U.S., with several hours of daily programming, Lewis teamed up with Dean Martin, and they almost immediately started gaining success as a nightclub comedy double act. Two years later, Martin and Lewis started appearing on television and quickly established themselves as a steady presence there, too. To skip through the patchy archive of Lewis's early television appearances on YouTube and elsewhere means encountering a comedian, who entered the limelight almost fully formed (and often much more fully formed than the medium he appeared in), but who also seemed to feel constrained by the opportunities given to him almost from the start. Lewis and television were not a perfect match,
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Scenes From Here and There

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython.I: MONEYGeorge Marshall’s Money from Home (1953) was shot in 3-D but I have not seen or studied the film in this capacity; I do hope to say a few things about depth and dimension. Money from Home is a “round” sort of narrative. It’s about debts and acquisitions. Early on, the currency is money though the film opens onto other kinds of currency, gradually.A lot of the slang for cash is borrowed from the pantry: Money from Home uses “potatoes” and “biscuits,” though I think it skips “clams,” “bread,” and “dough.” Money—its promise, anyway—is what sustains Dean Martin’s character, Honeytalk Nelson. (Honey, another food.) He’s introduced as an individual who is known the whole town over as potential loan sources. The next good feeling will take him to the race track. Honeytalk isn’t a malicious man,
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Interview, Audio: Illeana Douglas on Directors & Female Spirit

Chicago – The acting career of Illeana Douglas began with director Martin Scorsese and flourished in her first lead role for “Grace of My Heart” (1996). She is best known today for hosting the “Trailblazing Women” series on Turner Classic Movies, and in Part Three of a three part interview with HollywoodChicago.com, she talks about feminism, the essence of directors she has worked for, plus her grandmother Helen Gahagan, the third female Congress representative in U.S. history.

Illeana Douglas was born in Massachuetts, the daughter of Gregory Douglas, the son of 1930s movie star Melvyn Douglas (Helen Gahagan was his wife). She got the show biz bug as a young teenager, when she was able to visit her grandfather on the set of “Being There” (1979). After high school she moved to New York City to pursue a career. She studied acting while working various jobs, and met Martin Scorsese while
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‘Golden Exits’ First Trailer: Alex Ross Perry is Back For Another Round of Indie Film Dysfunction

‘Golden Exits’ First Trailer: Alex Ross Perry is Back For Another Round of Indie Film Dysfunction
Alex Ross Perry’s “Golden Exits” made its debut at Sundance nearly one year ago, and now it’s finally gearing up for its theatrical release this February with an official trailer that perfectly sells Perry’s trademark brand of indie film dysfunction.

Read More:‘Golden Exits’ Review: Alex Ross Perry Tries His Hand at Intimacy, With Mixed Results

Perry’s latest features one of his biggest ensemble casts, including Jason Schwartzman, Emily Browning, Chloe Sevigny, Analeigh Tipton, Mary-Louise Parker, and Adam Horovitz. The group play a bunch of Brooklynites whose lives are upended by the arrival of Browning’s disruptive young woman.

Check out the official “Golden Exits” trailer below. The movie opens in theaters February 9.

Sign Up:Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here. Related stories'Nostalgia' Trailer: Jon Hamm and Ellen Burstyn Star in Alex Ross Perry-Penned Ensemble
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Colgate Comedy Hour, September 18, 1955

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython. This article originally appeared in La Furia Umana’s Jerry Lewis dossier. It is republished with the kind permission of the author. On September 18th, 1955, Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin hosted the Colgate Comedy Hour for the 27th time. It would be six months before they began shooting Hollywood or Bust, after which their preposterously successful union dissolved. But from 8 – 9Pm on a studio set at NBC, they continued to work their alchemical comic magic, two perfectly poised bodies wreaking ingratiating destruction. These Colgate Hours are the closest approximation we can get of their fabled live performances, which were filled with unrehearsed pranks and ebullient anarchy. At the 21 minute and 35 second mark, a sketch begins that captures my imagined vision of their stage shows - a tongue-in-cheek tour-de-force of tightly sprung tension and a series of controlled manic releases. The camera
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A King in New York: Jerry Lewis and "The King of Comedy"

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi JerrythonI. Jerry Langford walks. Broadway and 51st, East 53rd, West 57th. He cuts a figure at one with his surroundings, in tune with the come-and-go ambiance—the ephemerality—of the city. He is of the people, a pedestrian among countless others. Or not. ‘Jerry Langford, right?’ The woman stops him, a magazine in her hand—as if it might, at any moment, become a weapon. ‘Oh Maurice,’ she tells the payphone into which she’s speaking, ‘please hold on.’ She asks Jerry to sign the magazine, showering him in praise, talking her way into talking more. ‘Oh Jerry,’ the woman continues, an improvised ambition swelling in her. ‘Please say something to my nephew Maurice on the phone. He’s in the hospital.’ That’s it: guilt the philanthrocapital out of them. ‘I’m sorry,’ Jerry replies, ‘I’m late.’ No sooner has
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Stars We Lost in 2017: Hugh Hefner, Mary Tyler Moore and More Famous Faces Who Died This Year

Stars We Lost in 2017: Hugh Hefner, Mary Tyler Moore and More Famous Faces Who Died This Year
Hollywood sure lost some serious star power in 2017. Whether you are a fan of talented musicians, exceptional actors or larger than life personalities, chances are you mourned the loss of several famous faces in the past 12 months. Music lovers were devastated to lose rock stars like Chris Cornell, Tom Petty and Chester Bennington. Whether you watched them on the big or small screen, talented stars like Mary Tyler Moore, Erin Moran and Jerry Lewis will be missed by many pop culture fans. And we won't soon forget Hugh Hefner's passing and the pioneering men's magazine he left behind.  As the year comes to an end, E! News is remembering the famous figures who passed away this...
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Hollywood & Entertainment Industry Deaths In 2017 – Photo Gallery

Another year and another group of Hollywood and media industry icons left us in 2017, from TV legends like Mary Tyler Moore to comedy greats like Jerry Lewis and Don Rickles, and cultural standbys like Hugh Hefner. There were unexpected losses, like Bill Paxton’s death at age 61 after complications during surgery; Brad Grey, the Paramount chief and co-founder of Hollywood’s powerful Brillstein-Grey Entertainment, dying of cancer at 59; and rocker Tom Petty Petty, who died…
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Hollywood & Entertainment Industry Deaths In 2017 – Photo Gallery

Hollywood & Entertainment Industry Deaths In 2017 – Photo Gallery
Another year and another group of Hollywood and media industry icons left us in 2017, from TV legends like Mary Tyler Moore to comedy greats like Jerry Lewis and Don Rickles, and cultural standbys like Hugh Hefner. There were unexpected losses, like Bill Paxton’s death at age 61 after complications during surgery; Brad Grey, the Paramount chief and co-founder of Hollywood’s powerful Brillstein-Grey Entertainment, dying of cancer at 59; and rocker Tom Petty Petty, who died…
See full article at Deadline »

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017
The past year saw the loss of some renowned character actors, including John Hurt, Bill Paxton and Harry Dean Stanton. We were both shaken and stirred by the death of Roger Moore, who played James Bond more than any other actor. On the other side of the camera, directors Jonathan Demme as well as horror masters Tobe Hooper and George A. Romero died in 2017.

Here’s a month-to-month look at some of the biggest names in the film world who died in 2017.

In January, “The Elephant Man” star Hurt died on Jan. 27. The 77-year old actor also starred in “Alien” and “Midnight Express.” Emmanuelle Riva, the French star of “Hiroshima Mon Amour” and more recently, “Amour,” died on Jan. 27 at 89.

Bill Paxton, who appeared on TV in “Big Love” and in films including “Titanic” and “Aliens,” died Feb. 25. He was just 61.

The Silence of the Lambs” director Demme, who had been suffering from cancer, died April 26 at
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Meeting Mr. Lewis

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Part of the Jerry Lewis tribute A Mubi Jerrython. Over the course of my forty years as the Los Angeles correspondent for Cahiers du cinema, I wrote about what was happening in American cinema, inventing a way of doing so inspired by Joan Didion’s essay “Having Fun,” which first appeared in The New Yorker. Ironically, Didion’s essay was a blast at the seriousness of people writing about film from outside the business who didn’t understand the inner workings of the studio system. When I met Serge Daney, the editor-in-chief of the Cahiers, at the New York apartment of Jackie Raynal and Sid Geffen on the occasion of the first Semaine des Cahiers in New York in 1977, which I had helped organize, we hit it off immediately. But he was understandably reluctant to entrust to someone who appeared to have been living in a subway the job I
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People Celebrates 2017 with a Special Edition Yearbook

People Celebrates 2017 with a Special Edition Yearbook
What a year! We couldn’t stop listening to “Despacito,” watched daylight turn to darkness and stocked up on tissues for This is Us viewings. We welcomed Beyoncé’s twins and Serena Williams’ daughter (plus celebrated her wedding!). We were left heartbroken at Chris Pratt and Anna Faris’ split, and sat on the edge of our seats as Hollywood drama unfolded at the Oscars and Grammys. In this special edition of People, we revisit all that and more.

The celebrity moments of 2017 weren’t limited to the red carpet: much of the year was focused on the new political climate.
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National Film Registry Adds ‘Die Hard,’ ‘Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,’ ‘Memento,’ and More Titles to Library of Congress

National Film Registry Adds ‘Die Hard,’ ‘Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,’ ‘Memento,’ and More Titles to Library of Congress
As is annual tradition, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has announced this year’s 25 film set to join the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Selected for their “cultural, historic and/or aesthetic importance,” the films picked range from such beloved actioners as “Die Hard,” childhood classic “The Goonies,” the seminal “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” and the mind-bending “Memento,” with plenty of other genres and styles represented among the list.

The additions span 1905 to 2000, and includes Hollywood blockbusters, documentaries, silent movies, animation, shorts, independent, and even home movies. The 2017 selections bring the number of films in the registry to 725.

“The selection of a film to the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to American cinema and the nation’s cultural and historical heritage,” Hayden said in an official statement. “Our love affair with motion pictures is a testament to their enduring power to enlighten, inspire and
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The Reality of a Reflection: An Exploration of Jean-Luc Godard's Filmography

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Mubi's retrospective For Ever Godard is showing from November 12, 2017 - January 16, 2018 in the United States.Jean-Luc Godard is a difficult filmmaker to pin down because while his thematic concerns as an artist have remained more or less consistent over the last seven decades, his form is ever-shifting. His filmography is impossible to view in a vacuum, as his work strives to reflect on the constantly evolving cinema culture that surrounds it: Godard always works with the newest filmmaking technologies available, and his films have become increasingly abstracted and opaque as the wider culture of moving images has become increasingly fragmented. Rather than working to maintain an illusion of diegetic truth, Godard’s work as always foreground its status as a manufactured product—of technology, of an industry, of on-set conditions and of an individual’s imagination. Mubi’S Godard retrospective exemplifies the depth and range of Godard’s career as
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Viennale 2017. Era's End

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The Night I SwamThe Vienna International Film Festival—or the Viennale, for short—has for many years been a kind of respite, perhaps even a bit of a beautiful secret outside of European cinephilia, for those looking to be invigorated by the ever-renewing promise of cinema. First under the direction of Alexander Horwath, who left the festival in 1997 and in 2002 took the lead of the illustrious Austrian Film Museum, and for the last 21 years under the guidance of Hans Hurch, the Viennale has cultivated that rare thing: A cultural institution that has a distinct and idiosyncratic sensibility of taste. It is a yearly event in which you can find the rare gems of the mainstream vividly mixed with expansive retrospectives, the latest films from major auteurs and exciting debutantes alike, with no fear of short or medium length works, a strong love for the avant-garde and an even more fierce
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