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1-20 of 88 items from 2009   « Prev | Next »


Sound Off: Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes - Your Thoughts?

26 December 2009 8:17 AM, PST | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Now that you've seen it, what did you think? The last time we saw British detective Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick Dr. Watson on the big screen was in 1985 in Barry Levinson's Young Sherlock Holmes. Now director Guy Ritchie and producer Joel Silver have brought him back again. But how is the new movie? How are Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law together and Holmes and Watson? Is it entertaining to watch or is it all style and no substance? How is Mark Strong as the villain Lord Blackwood? Is it a classic Holmes story? If you've seen it, then sound off, leave a comment, and let us know what you thought of Sherlock Holmes! To fuel the fire, Sherlock Holmes is a fantastic movie. I've seen it twice and I loved it even more the second time. It's a considerably darker movie with a lot more intensity than »

- Alex Billington

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Review: Sherlock Holmes

25 December 2009 7:57 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

It’s best to distance yourself from notions of what you expect from a Guy Ritchie film and instead think of this as a vigorous adaptation of the iconic detective, fronted by an actor whose charisma, wit and strong physical presence makes this film a joy to behold.

Guy Ritchie has made an entertaining and exciting film, faithful to the core of the original rather than the accepted iconography of the enduring detective. To paraphrase the tagline of a recent, and successful, reinvention: this is not your father’s Sherlock Holmes.

Determined to avoid the narrative restraints of an origin story this film begins with Watson, Holmes and the familiar miscellany of Conan Doyle’s characters in play. Opening with a baroque action set piece Holmes and Watson apprehend Lord Blackwood in the throes of bloody, ritualistic murder. Lestrade and his forces turn up too late and what could have »

- Jon Lyus

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Al Pacino, Barry Levinson & Buck Henry Adapting The Humbling

16 December 2009 11:34 AM, PST | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

After this year's Summer of Death, losing a filmmaking legend like John Hughes got me thinking about how difficult it's going to be in the coming years as more legendary actors, writers and directors responsible for the films I've grown up loving (or discovered recently) start passing away. However, three legendary artists are still alive and kicking as the NY Times reports that Al Pacino, director Barry Levinson and writer/actor Buck Henry are teaming up to adapt Philip Roth's novel The Humbling, the story of  a deteriorating and increasingly irrelevant actor who finds the possibility of renewal in a younger woman. Pacino is the one who purchased the rights to the book (his first time optioning one) so that Henry (who wrote The Graduate) could adapt the screenplay for Levinson (who directed Rain Man) to bring to the big screen. It's sad to note that Pacino's taking on »

- Ethan Anderton

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Al Pacino to Star in The Humbling for Director Barry Levinson

16 December 2009 7:37 AM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

The New York Times Arts Beat is reporting that Al Pacino will star in an adaptation of Philip Roth’s latest novel, The Humbling. The film will be directed by Academy Award winning director Barry Levinson (Rain ManBugsy) and will be written by legendary screenwriter Buck Henry (The GraduateTo Die For).  Pacino will star in the lead role and also bought the movie rights to the novel, which is about “an aging and irrelevant stage actor who finds hope of renewal through a younger woman”.  This sounds pretty bland and cliche to me, but I do have a little bit of hope for this one just because of Buck Henry’s involvement.

Barry Levinson and Al Pacino also just finished working together on the cleverly named Jack Kevorkian biopic, You Don’t Know Jack, which will air on HBO sometime next year.

»

- Ramses Flores

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Barry Levinson to Direct Al Pacino in 'The Humbling'

15 December 2009 4:18 PM, PST | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Oh, goodie, it's another Philip Roth adaptation about an aging man awakened in life through an affair with a much younger woman! This one is based on Roth's latest, The Humbling, and while I'm sure the writing in the novel is great as usual, I can't help but think the movie version will be more of the same old man with hot actress erotic fantasy stuff of The Human Stain and Elegy.

According to the New York Times, Al Pacino, who bought the rights to the book, will star as the suicidal, past-his-prime stage actor who winds up on a farm in upstate New York making it with his friends' daughter, a 40-year-old (unless Hollywood expectantly lowers here age) with lesbian tendencies and an interest in kinky stuff like strap-ons.

Directing the picture is Barry Levinson, who has collaborated with Pacino before in different capacity. He co-wrote the 1979 legal drama »

- Christopher Campbell

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Interview: Producer Alfred Spellman on His New, Hit Sports Documentary The U

15 December 2009 4:00 PM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

In this day and age, it's difficult for men to agree on much of anything, but we all feel that the Miami Hurricanes are the greatest college football team of all time. Yeah? A new feature-length doc entitled The U about the University of Miami's equal parts legendary and notorious football program more than upholds this notion. As the latest entry in Espn's 30 for 30 showcase, The U joins other sports documentaries made by reputable and well known filmmakers the likes of Peter Berg, Barry Levinson and forthcoming ones by Morgan Freeman and Jeff Tremaine of Jackass. After the jump is a choice clip from The U and an interview with its producer, Alfred Spellman, who has made a name for himself alongside pal and U director, Billy Corben, with their Miami-based production company rakontur. Spellman discusses his doc, and the team itself within a historical and cultural context. He also »

- Hunter Stephenson

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Al Pacino Adapting Philip Roth's Latest Novel For Himself

15 December 2009 11:45 AM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

You simply can't keep an old man down in the movie business-- Clint Eastwood is proof enough of that fact. Now four of the most illustrious old coots we have-- Al Pacino, Barry Levinson, Buck Henry and Philip Roth-- are teaming up for the first time, with Pacino set to start in a movie version of The Humbling, Roth's newest novel about an aging stage actor who starts up with a younger woman. According to The New York Times, Levinson will direct and Henry, who wrote The Graduate, will adapt the screenplay. It's worth noting that The Humbling got only so-so reviews when it was published, and none of Roth's novels have been adapted for film all that successfully. Still, good on 'em for trying. If they can get a good Pacino performance out it, it'll all be worth it-- not to mention being a downright miracle. »

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Hollywood Ink: Single, Irrelevant White Male Seeks Muse

15 December 2009 7:30 AM, PST | Movieline | See recent Movieline news »

· Their words, not mine: Al Pacino has optioned Philip Roth's recent novel The Humbling for a film adaptation, also roping in Barry Levinson to possibly direct the story of "an aging and irrelevant stage actor who finds hope of renewal through a younger woman." In one of those moments of miraculous Hollywood serendipity, Anna Kendrick's excited agent and a wholly disgusted Manohla Dargis spat their morning coffee onto their desks after hearing the news. [Nyt]

In the Heights and Creature from the Black Lagoon get their directors, Paramount milks its library, and more Hollywood Ink after the jump. »

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Lou Jacobi obituary

16 November 2009 4:59 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Character actor and comedian who specialised in Jewish roles

Portly, balding, twinkly-eyed and sporting a moustache, Lou Jacobi, who has died aged 95, believed that he "had the look of everybody's favourite Uncle Max". Although Jacobi had been acting since he was 12, he was the sort of character actor that one could never imagine being young. He was born in the Jewish section of Toronto, Canada, and started performing as a child in the Yiddish theatre in a play called The Rabbi and the Priest, in which he was a violin prodigy. He went on to specialise in Jewish roles, both comic and dramatic, lending them that particular intonation and body language of which he was a master.

In the 1940s, Jacobi worked as a stand- up comic at holiday resorts in Muskoka, north of Toronto, a vacation spot popular with Jewish holidaymakers. He was also cast in Spring Thaw (1949), which »

- Ronald Bergan

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Lou Jacobi obituary

16 November 2009 4:59 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Character actor and comedian who specialised in Jewish roles

Portly, balding, twinkly-eyed and sporting a moustache, Lou Jacobi, who has died aged 95, believed that he "had the look of everybody's favourite Uncle Max". Although Jacobi had been acting since he was 12, he was the sort of character actor that one could never imagine being young. He was born in the Jewish section of Toronto, Canada, and started performing as a child in the Yiddish theatre in a play called The Rabbi and the Priest, in which he was a violin prodigy. He went on to specialise in Jewish roles, both comic and dramatic, lending them that particular intonation and body language of which he was a master.

In the 1940s, Jacobi worked as a stand- up comic at holiday resorts in Muskoka, north of Toronto, a vacation spot popular with Jewish holidaymakers. He was also cast in Spring Thaw (1949), which »

- Ronald Bergan

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Levinson Slams Nyt Critic 'For Her Blatant Inaccuracies'

10 November 2009 6:16 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

By Wrap Staff

New York Times TV critic Alessandra Stanley is coming under attack from filmmaker Barry Levinson, who took the highly unusual -- though not unheard of -- step of criticizing the critic.

Stanley, whose high correction rate has attracted the critical eye of media watchdogs as diverse as Gawker and Columbia Journalism Review, is now being slammed for misrepresenting Levinson's "Poliwood." A documentary that explores the connections between celebrities and Washington, "Poliwood" premiered at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival and last week made its TV debut on Showti »

- Josh Dickey

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Criticism Is One Thing, Inaccuracy Another

10 November 2009 5:48 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

By Barry Levinson

As I write this, I realize I am about to do something that, for the most part, is never done. I am going to criticize a critic.

Filmmakers are never supposed to respond to a critic about their work. It’s an unspoken rule of engagement. But in this case, I feel compelled.

I am going to criticize Alessandra Stanley, the TV critic for the New York Times. I am not going to criticize her on the basis of what she may not like about my recent film essay “Poliwood,” but I am going to take her to task for her blatant inaccuracies. For her inability to view the piece f »

- Lisa Horowitz

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Barry Levinson

10 November 2009 5:30 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Barry Levinson is an Oscar-winning director, screenwriter and producer. His film credits include "Diner," "Rain Man," "Good Morning, Vietnam," "Bugsy," "Wag the Dog" and recent documentary "Poliwood." He was executive producer of TV series "Homicide: Life on the Street" and "Oz." Known for his devotion to his native Baltimore, he is a minority owner of the Baltimore Orioles baseball team. »

- Lisa Horowitz

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Actor Matthew Marsden Hides Right-Wing Political Views

6 November 2009 8:20 AM, PST | Huffington Post | See recent Huffington Post news »

Americans take it on faith that movie stars are politically liberal. Whether the celebrity lives in L.A. or New York, from Streisand to Sarandon, we know how they see the world because they're honest about it. Some don't think liberal actors should espouse personal views. The performer should shut up and dance, or sing, or act. This is different from other professions. If you sit at the corner bar, you'll hear a butcher, baker, candlestick maker opine on all sorts of things in public, often loudly after a few drinks. It's their right, yet they'll also be the first to tell you that so-called "famous people" shouldn't do so.....unless they're conservative, of course. The Dixie Chicks? Never, never, never. The new documentary from Academy Award-winning director Barry Levinson, Poliwood examines the intersection of politics and »

- Jackson Williams

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What's On: The Land of Poliwood

2 November 2009 4:00 PM, PST | Movieline | See recent Movieline news »

On the eve of Edward Norton's By the People: The Election of Barack Obama's HBO premiere, Showtime rolls out Barry Levinson's Poliwood, a documentary examining the positive and negative effects that celebrities have on politics. The program revisits last year's Democratic and Republican national conventions to explore the public's take on movie stars' political outspokenness. The 90-minute film includes conversations with Ellen Burstyn, Susan Sarandon, Sting, Elvis Costello, Annette Bening, Tim Daly (who also produced the documentary) and many others. »

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Aff Review: Poliwood

1 November 2009 12:02 PM, PST | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

It's not uncommon to hear people discussing -- or complaining about -- the ways in which Hollywood celebrities are involved in politics, whether they're airing their opinions during a concert or speaking in public on behalf of a politician. Barry Levinson (Diner, Good Morning Vietnam) thought this was an interesting enough topic to address in his documentary Poliwood, which focuses on the 2008 national Democratic and Republican conventions. Unfortunately, the documentary shows us little that we haven't already seen, and tends to preach to the converted.

Poliwood is subtitled "a Barry Levinson film essay," which signals us that this will be a more personal style of documentary. Levinson opens the movie with shots from his 1990 feature film Avalon and uses this footage to discuss the ways American lives have changed because of television. His focus is on the Creative Coalition, a non-partisan organization of celebrities that focuses on issues such as arts education. »

- Jette Kernion

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Denver Film Festival announces full lineup

26 October 2009 11:34 AM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

The only big film festival in my own backyard is back and it runs from November 12th through the 22nd. While it caters more to heavy run fest material and arthouse film, they do have some of the more interesting films playing this year:

Ryan Ward's excellent Son of the Sunshine which is one of my favorite films of the year. (review)

The weird, lengthy comedy The Revenant (review)

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans

The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus

and much more. Program after the break!

In Competition

Children of Invention

Two first-generation Chinese kids in suburban Boston find themselves on their own after their desperate mother is unwittingly involved in a pyramid scheme and arrested. Older brother Raymond takes a page from her marketing seminars to start creating a life for himself and his sister - casting a strange, pint-sized reflection on the American Dream.

Footprints »

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Baseball Films - A Lineup of Undeniable “Hits”

14 October 2009 8:25 AM, PDT | ScreenRant.com | See recent Screen Rant news »

In 1982, I remember hoisting little Mike Sopocy on my shoulders after we’d won the Little League Championship Tournament in Schaumburg, Il. In those days, baseball wasn’t just something I participated in during the summer when we were off school, it was a life - complete with its own culture, vernacular and a dedication that continues to fuel my competitive juices.

This week, professional baseball teams from 4 metropolitan cities gather in a variety of arenas to determine who will go head-to-head in the final test of baseball greatness - The World Series - an event that always unveils itself in the crisp days of October.

 

There’s something about baseball that drives everyone. Whether it’s using baseball-riddled colloquialisms to describe your success or failure level on a workplace task; to describe how fast time is going during an event; or even how far you are along in a whimsical teenage physical relationship, »

- Mike Wilkerson

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Jerry Bruckheimer Still Wants to Play 'Apaches'

13 October 2009 9:45 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

The property has been bouncing around Hollywood for at least a dozen years, but producer Jerry Bruckheimer is intent on bringing Lorenzo Carcaterra's Apaches to the big screen. According to a recent Variety report, Jerry has hired the screenwriting team of Sean O'Keefe and Will Staples to take a shot at the source material. And no, it's not about actual Apache warriors. It's actually a crime story about a group of retired cops who go on a vigilante spree when the need arises. If this duo can bang out a workable draft, and that's something a lot of established writers have failed to do, then we may have a cool action flick to check out. The book even has a sequel called Chasers, so there's that to consider.

Movie fans will remember Carcaterra's name from Sleepers, the Barry Levinson film that was based on the author's book, plus he's »

- Scott Weinberg

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Bruckheimer Hires Scriptwriters for Apaches

13 October 2009 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Back in 1997, my favourite producer, Mr Jerry Bruckheimer bought the film rights to Lorenzo Carcaterra’s book, ‘Apaches’. Carcaterra has previously brought us the novel ‘Sleepers’ which was then turned into an amazing movie by director Barry Levinson. Bruckheimer has had a few different screenwriters give the novel a going over to see if they could turn the book into a movie. So far no one has impressed him and it’s sat on a shelf for the past 12 years.

All that may change though as Variety are reporting that he’s blown the dust off the project and hired Sean O’Keefe and Will Staples to see if they can create a cracking new screenplay.

The novel focuses on a group of six retired NYPD cops who decide to start fighting crime without the help of official channels. They find themselves battling against a drug cartel using their connections to bring it down. »

- David Sztypuljak

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1-20 of 88 items from 2009   « Prev | Next »


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