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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1991

1-20 of 36 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


France Televisions Inks Deal With Universal: Report

5 March 2015 3:44 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Paris– French pubcaster France Televisions has inked a first-look deal with Universal, according to Gaul’s news website Bfmtv.

Under the deal, France Televisions, which operates five free-to-air channels, has a first look right on new series produced by Universal, which previously had an output deal with Gaul’s top commercial net TF1.

Among the Universal series expected to roll out on France Televisions are the medical show “Heart Matters” with Melissa George; Barry Levinson’s cop drama “Shades of Blue” toplining Jennifer Lopez (pictured above) as a single mother recruited by the FBI as an undercover agent; and “Telenovela,” the comedy skein starring and exec produced by Eva Longoria.

TF1 will keep existing Universal shows such as “House,” “Suits,” “Parenthood,” “The Event” and “Chicago Fire.” TF1 also has output deals with Warner Bros. and Sony.

The deal with Universal was signed in the run-up to a major shakeup at »

- Elsa Keslassy

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'Hunger Games: Mockingjay', 'Foxcatcher' and More On DVD & Blu-ray This Week

3 March 2015 7:00 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 actually releases on March 6th so don't go looking on the shelves until Saturday, or, then again, if you want my advice, don't go looking for this one at all. It's not very good.

Foxcatcher I thought Foxcatcher was a great film, but one I have no real desire to revisit. The Blu-ray comes with some deleted scenes as well as a new "The Story of Foxcatcher" featurette. Not exactly enough to get me to want to spring for a copy.

The Humbling Mike didn't really like this one and I can't say I have too much interest in it. Director Barry Levinson just isn't really hitting it out of the park any longer, or even really hitting singles at the moment, though Rock the Kasbah looks like it could be good.

The Captive I was mildly interested in this one, »

- Brad Brevet

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Humbling, The | Blu-ray Review

2 March 2015 6:15 AM, PST | SmellsLikeScreenSpirit | See recent SmellsLikeScreenSpirit news »

While The Humbling features an amazingly low-key performance by Pacino, the narrative approach muddles the story into nonsensical mumbling. It is kind of hard to blame director Barry Levinson or the screenwriters (Buck Henry and Michal Zebede) for failing to successfully adapt a Philip Roth novel for the silver screen. As we have learned time and time again, Roth's writing seems almost too cerebral and internalized to be captured with cinematic images. »

- Don Simpson

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All Bets Are Off: Top Ten Films About Las Vegas

1 March 2015 9:19 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Las Vegas…the hotbed haven where dreams of high rollers are realized among the glitzy bright lights, the element of chance and luck and the adrenaline for instant fortune. But there is a deception to Sin City that is overlooked–the isolation of a gambler’s anxiety and desperation, the false sense of confidence at the craps table and the swinging doors of the psychological lows more so than the rewarding highs.

Still, Las Vegas has its excitable aura–both innocence and guilt–where one arrives to skillfully manufacture their financial profile or go bust. In some instances, the hedonistic expectations are defined in other fun, precarious ways. It is no wonder that Hollywood has come calling to put its distinctive spin on the capital city of adult entertainment. For decades, the movies have made Las Vegas its backdrop for wonderment, degradation, intrigue, comical curiosity and soul-searching revelations.

In All »

- Frank Ochieng

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Jennifer Lopez’s ‘Shades of Blue’ Adds Ray Liotta & Drea de Matteo

26 February 2015 11:15 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Jennifer Lopez’s NBC cop drama “Shades of Blue” has rounded out its ensemble with Ray Liotta, Drea de MatteoVincent Laresca and Warren Kole, Variety has learned.

The 13-episode series follows police officers who are effective at keeping the streets safe, but also corrupt when it comes to lining their pockets and protecting their own. Lopez will star as Det. Harlee McCord, a single mother recruited to work undercover for the FBI’s anti-corruption task force. When McCord is forced to become a federal informant, she must decide between her own family’s welfare and that of her police family.

Liotta has been cast as Lt. Bill Wozniak, the enigmatic and resourceful patriarch of the group of cops. Wozniak steps outside the limitations of the law to protect his precinct and effectively navigates his own moral code until he comes to believe he’s been betrayed by one of his own. »

- Elizabeth Wagmeister

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The Losers: Penny Marshall Should Have Won an Oscar

25 February 2015 7:47 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Over the past week, we’ve been celebrating the losers — those talented filmmakers whom Oscar has foolishly overlooked. In this final entry, we ask the Zoltar Machine for a do-over. If you asked me specifically which Oscar-winning director should have their gold snatched away and given to Penny Marshall, I don’t know that I’d have an answer. The year she would have been eligible for Big, Barry Levinson won for Rain Man. The year she would have been eligible for Awakenings, Kevin Costner won for Dances With Wolves. The year she would have been eligible for A League of Their Own, Clint Eastwood won for Unforgiven. There’s no easy way to rewrite history and slide her name in where someone else’s was previously, although a case can easily be made that Big and Rain Man (the Best Picture of 1988) share near-identical emotional DNA. The following year, the »

- Scott Beggs

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The Humbling Movie Review

11 February 2015 7:52 AM, PST | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

The Humbling Millennium Entertainment Reviewed for Shockya by Harvey Karten. Data-based on Rotten Tomatoes. Grade:  B Director:  Barry Levinson Screenwriter:  Buck Henry, Michal Zebede, based on a Philip Roth Novel Cast:  Al Pacino, Greta Gerwig, Nina Arianda, Dylan Baker, Charles Grodin, Dan Hedaya, Billy Porter, Kyra Sedgwick, Dianne Wiest Screened at:  Review 1, NYC, 1/13/14 Opens:  January 23, 2015 There may be some truth to the idea that actors—like Al Pacino’s character in Barry Levinson’s “The Humbling”– can lose their minds, unable to untangle reality from fantasy.  Levinson, best known in these parts for “Rain Man” (an autistic savant who lives in his own world), takes on a similar theme  [ Read More ]

The post The Humbling Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Harvey Karten

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Open Road Films Acquires Animated Saga 'Blazing Samurai'

6 February 2015 9:58 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Open Road Films has recently acquired the U.S. distribution rights to the animated family film "Blazing Samurai." The film is described as being "loosely based" on the 1974 Mel Brooks film "Blazing Saddles," which was, in turn, a spoof of '50s/'60s cowboy movies. The official synopsis reads: "An action-packed comedy about a scrappy young dog named Hank who fights to save the town of Kakamucho from becoming the litter box of a nefarious feline warlord, transforming society and himself on his quest to become a true samurai."  Open Road Films recently distributed "Nightcrawler," starring Jake Gyllanhaal, and the company's upcoming features include Oliver Stone's Edward Snowden biopic and Barry Levinson's "Rock The Kasbah." "Blazing Samurai" is directed by Chris Bailey ("Alvin and the Chipmunks") and Mark Koetsier ("Kung Fu Panda," "How To Train Your Dragon") from a screenplay »

- Elizabeth Logan

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New dates set for Paranormal Activity 5 and new Ring film

29 January 2015 2:36 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

ComingSoon.net are today reporting that Paramount Pictures has re-adjusted its horror slate for 2015, with news that two of its newest entries into their scary franchises have new dates.

The latest entry into the Paranormal Activity franchise, known as Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension, has been pushed back from March 13th this year to the far spookier date of October 23rd. Details are sparse on the film, but the story is reportedly set around ghostly goings-on in a house that may be linked to Katie and Tobey from Paranomal Activity 4.

The film will be up against Vin Diesel-starrer The Last Witch Hunter and Jon M. Chu’s Jem and the Holograms, an adaptation on the 1980’s cartoon.

In addition to Paranormal, Paramount is resuscitating another horror franchise in the shape of Rings, the third entry in the Ring series. The latest entry has been bumped up to November 13th »

- Gary Collinson

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New dates set for Paranormal Activity 5 and new Ring film

28 January 2015 11:06 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

ComingSoon.net are today reporting that Paramount Pictures has re-adjusted its horror slate for 2015, with news that two of its newest entries into their scary franchises have new dates.

The latest entry into the Paranormal Activity franchise, known as Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension, has been pushed back from March 13th this year to the far spookier date of October 23rd. Details are sparse on the film, but the story is reportedly set around ghostly goings-on in a house that may be linked to Katie and Tobey from Paranomal Activity 4.

The film will be up against Vin Diesel-starrer The Last Witch Hunter and Jon M. Chu’s Jem and the Holograms, an adaptation on the 1980’s cartoon.

In addition to Paranormal, Paramount is resuscitating another horror franchise in the shape of Rings, the third entry in the Ring series. The latest entry has been bumped up to November 13th »

- Scott J. Davis

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Why the Found Footage Genre Is Broken (and How to Fix It)

28 January 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week, "Project Almanac" comes out in theaters nationwide. It's the tale of a group of teenagers who stumble upon a time machine and use it for their own personal gain. It harkens back to movies like "Back to the Future," with the potential hazards of messing with the space-time continuum revealed as the movie goes along. But the movie is filmed as though it is being recorded by one of the kids, in an aesthetic commonly referred to as "found footage." That's right, it's grainy and shaky and purposefully amateurish, and while the movie mostly works, it's still not enough to make you wish the movie was photographed and edited like an actual movie.

The found footage genre, exemplified by genre exercises like the "Paranormal Activity" series, has reached an impasse. Audiences are bored with it, and there's been barely any new spin on the aesthetic since 1999's groundbreaking "The Blair Witch Project. »

- Drew Taylor

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Al Pacino On 'The Humbling' and His Recent Creative Comeback

25 January 2015 8:28 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor's Note: This post is presented in partnership with Time Warner Cable Movies On Demand in support of Indie Film Month. Today's pick, "The Humbling," is available now On Demand. This interview originally ran during last year's Sundance Film Festival.] It's indisputable that Al Pacino is one of the greatest screen actors of all time. Still, even the greats sometimes deliver a turkey. The actor experienced a rough patch from 2005 to 2012, during which he appeared in a number of critically panned films, including "The Son of No One" and "Jack and Jill." But over the last two years he's turned it around to deliver two performances that harken back to his best work: David Gordon Green's "Manglehorn" and Barry Levinson's "The Humbling," both of which premiered on the festival circuit late last year. In "The Humbling," which recently opened in theaters and is available to view on video on demand »

- Nigel M Smith

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Philip Roth adaptation ‘The Humbling’ makes bland stabs at relevance

24 January 2015 4:55 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Humbling

Written for the screen by Buck Henry and Michal Zebede

Directed by Barry Levinson

USA, 2014

In 2009, New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani referred to Philip Roth’s novella The Humbling as “an overstuffed short story, […] a slight, disposable work about an aging man’s efforts to grapple with time and loss and mortality, and the frustrations of getting old.” In 2015, that sentiment rings just as true of Barry Levinson’s adaptation of the same work. The Humbling runs too long, dawdles too much, makes hollow caricatures of its women, and muddles its intentions. Its most redeeming features are its performances; Al Pacino is in top form, with Greta Gerwig playfully keeping up. But neither can elevate this failed attempt at pathos above what it is: bland.

We open on Pacino, as legendary actor Simon Axler, readying himself for the stage. He paints his face, and recites his lines, »

- Ariel Fisher

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The Humbling—Movie Review

22 January 2015 9:01 PM, PST | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

Al Pacino is almost always worth watching, and his latest endeavor is especially welcome: a vehicle that’s tailor-made for the actor at this moment in his life and career. The Humbling is based on Philip Roth’s novel, which was vilified by some reviewers as a dirty-old-man’s sexual fantasy. The film, directed by Barry Levinson and credited to screenwriters Buck Henry and Michal Zebede, is considerably more complex. It also bears a superficial resemblance to Birdman in that it focuses on an actor experiencing a crisis of identity and purpose. In the opening scene, Pacino is applying makeup and testing himself in a mirror, repeatedly challenging his line readings, wondering if ...

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- Leonard Maltin

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The Humbling and Match Are Anchored by Titanically Hammy Performances

22 January 2015 5:00 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

We critics don’t show enough ­reverence for a certain kind of ham acting, which can represent not just self-­indulgence but relish, boldness, and a splendid absence of shame. Two titanically hammy performances bring that home, both by actors also playing hams: Al Pacino as a spent, delusional old Shakespearean in The ­Humbling and Patrick Stewart as an aging dance professor in Match. This is hamming as the royal road to catharsis—purge hamming.The Humbling is from one of Philip Roth’s leaner, more exhibitionistic novels, a tantrum over age and impotence, a rage against the dying of the dick. It’s not his finest hour, but he’s Philip Roth and has earned his self-pity (and hamminess). In Barry Levinson’s film (Buck Henry and Michal Zebede did the adaptation), Pacino is stage star Simon Axler, who tells anyone who’ll listen that he awoke one day »

- David Edelstein

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The Humbling | Review

21 January 2015 9:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Or The Unexpected Convenience of Sexism: Levinson’s Perplexing but Deviously Funny Stab at Roth

Decades passed between initial adaptations of novelist Philip Roth’s novels (1969’s Goodbye Columbus; 1972’s Portnoy’s Complaint) before filmmakers like Robert Benton and Isabel Coixet mounted their own renditions to varied reception in the past decade or so with The Human Stain (2003) and Elegy (2008), respectively. After a decently received found footage horror film with 2012’s The Bay, seasoned director Barry Levinson adapts The Humbling, which, like Roth’s novel itself, initially received some of the same unfavorable notices from Venice and Toronto Int. Film Fests. But Roth’s novels are exactly the kind of difficult narratives that used to make for a tradition of daring cinema that’s been eclipsed by safety and sanitization in an effort to decrease offense and increase mass satisfaction. That’s not to say that Levinson is entirely successful »

- Nicholas Bell

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In The Humbling Pacino, Levinson, and the Great Novelist Stare Down the End

20 January 2015 9:00 PM, PST | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

There’s something bracingly honest about The Humbling, Barry Levinson’s movie about a 67-year-old Shakespearean actor, played by Al Pacino, who, after being struck with crippling anxiety, gets his mojo restored — some of it, anyway — by a manipulative muse (Greta Gerwig). Based on the 2009 Philip Roth novel of the same name, this is a movie made by an old man, about an old man, starring an old man, from source material written by an old man. But Levinson and Pacino’s willingness to explore the creakier end of life isn’t a drawback; it’s what gives The Humbling its bittersweet vitality.

Levinson doesn’t make the mistake of trying anything fancy here: The movie was shot in twenty days at his own Connecticut house, a stan »

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Bruce Willis Joins Thriller ‘Extraction’

20 January 2015 7:02 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In a pre-Berlin Film Festival deal, Bruce Willis has joined the thriller “Extraction,” set to start shooting next month in Alabama.

Highland Film Group will launch international sales in Berlin. Producers are Emmett/Furla/Oasis Films’ Randall Emmett and George Furla along with Adam Goldworm through Aperture. Tim Sullivan, Brandon Grimes and Gus Furla are co-producers.

Stephen C. Miller is directing from a script by Umair Aleem. Willis plays a former CIA operative working with his son on the development of a lethal weapon when his father is kidnapped by a terrorist group.

Efo, Ingenious and Odyssey Releasing Media are funding the film, which will be released in the U.S. by Lionsgate/Grindstone.

Willis was also attached last week to another action movie for sale in Berlin: “Wake,” with John Pogue directing from a script by Chris Borrelli. Producers are Michael Benaroya of Benaroya Pictures, Tobin Armbrust, David Alpert and Chris Cowles. »

- Dave McNary

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Barry Levinson on Oscar’s Racial Controversy (Exclusive)

20 January 2015 3:40 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director Barry Levinson offers his thoughts on what’s behind the growing outcry for more diversity in Hollywood films.

Are we a racist country? Yes. But we are getting better. For certain. And while that battle for absolute equality is being played out, an odd controversy about the racial injustice in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has emerged. The Oscar nominations of 2015 are being questioned as racially prejudicial. There are those who say a black woman, who directed “Selma,” was overlooked because of racial bias, and the actor who played Martin Luther King Jr. was also overlooked because he was black. The film was nominated by the Academy, but these individuals were not. I would tend to agree with these accusations if I thought the Academy had a great record of selecting the best nominees each year, but they don’t. It is impossible to pass through a single awards season without hearing, »

- Barry Levinson

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Review: Induglent And Not-So-Humble 'The Humbling' With Al Pacino & Greta Gerwig

20 January 2015 3:33 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

"Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything" is a line from Shakespeare's description of the final stage of life made famous in the "All the world's a stage" monologue from "As You Like It." And it is quoted early on in Barry Levinson’s incoherent adaptation of what is by most accounts a substandard Philip Roth novel, “The Humbling,” to clearly point the way to the film's themes of aging, and the diminishment that comes with it. But "toothless, sightless, bland, and empty" could also serve as a harsh but accurate description of the film itself: a missed opportunity that squanders the talents of a stacked cast, and trespasses on the audience’s patience and care for its spoiled characters for too long.  Purportedly following a kind of long, dark, night of the soul for a creatively drained, previously famous theater actor, we can see why Al Pacino would be attracted to the material. »

- Jessica Kiang

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1991

1-20 of 36 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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