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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 147 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Giveaway – Win Once Upon a Time in America: Extended Director’s Cut on Blu-ray!

24 October 2014 2:35 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sergio Leone’s original vision for his tour-de-force “Once Upon a Time in America” is now available in the UK with Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s (Wbhe) Blu-ray™ and Digital HD with UltraViolet™ release of the Extended Director’s Cut, and we have a copy to give away!

This 251-minute cut was a restoration funded by The Film Foundation, the film preservation organisation founded by Martin Scorsese, and its partner Gucci. The restored footage has been returned to the film three decades after its theatrical release, deepening the characters and enlarging the work of its astonishing cast: Robert De Niro and James Woods as lifelong pals and crime kingpins, Tuesday Weld, Joe Pesci, Jennifer Connelly, Elizabeth McGovern, Treat Williams and Louise Fletcher. The latter three are showcased in recovered scenes.

© 1983 The Ladd Company. All Rights Reserved.

Available to order on Amazon today: http://amzn.to/1yHh4xG

To be in with a chance of winning, »

- Gary Collinson

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Win ‘Once Upon A Time In America’ On Blu-ray!

23 October 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Sergio Leone’s original vision for his tour-de-force Once Upon A Time In America is now available in the UK with Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s (Wbhe) Blu-ray™ and Digital HD with UltraViolet™ release of the Extended Director’s Cut.

This 251-minute cut was a restoration funded by The Film Foundation, the film preservation organisation founded by Martin Scorsese, and its partner Gucci. The restored footage has been returned to the film three decades after its theatrical release, deepening the characters and enlarging the work of its astonishing cast: Robert De Niro and James Woods as lifelong pals and crime kingpins, Tuesday Weld, Joe Pesci, Jennifer Connelly, Elizabeth McGovern, Treat Williams and Louise Fletcher. The latter three are showcased in recovered scenes.

Available to order on Amazon today:  http://amzn.to/1yHh4xG

© 1983 The Ladd Company. All Rights Reserved.

To be in with a chance of winning this stunning Blu-ray, »

- Dan Bullock

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‘The Collector’ Showcases the Brilliance of Sergio Toppi

16 October 2014 7:49 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Collector

Writer and Art: Sergio Toppi

Letters: Deron Bennett

Translater: Edward Gauvin

Publisher: Archaia (Boom! Studios)

It is a very wonderful thing for the artwork of Italian artist Sergio Toppi to exist in our world, his brilliance extremely evident upon the first few pages of The Collector: this beautiful release by Archaia through Boom! Studios. The Collector is the only single English translated release of Toppi’s works that is available at the moment. Beforehand, the artwork could leave a lasting impression within the French or Italian editions, but now, the words of Toppi can be shared in English alongside his great visuals.

Upon gazing ones eyes on the stark penciling of Toppi, there is an immediate sense of life and texture with the images. You can almost feel the rough edgings of the trees and rocks, you can hear the calm pattering of the water, and you most »

- Anthony Spataro

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Naji Abu Nowar: Q&A With Variety’s Arab Filmmaker of the Year

16 October 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Even before Naji Abu Nowar took home the director prize at the 2014 Venice Horizons section, his feature debut, “Theeb,” was one of the most talked-about films on the Lido. Born in Oxford and educated in Jordan and the U.K., Nowar has helped spotlight Jordan — not for outside crews seeking spectacular locations but for local talent telling local stories. “Theeb” is a stunning, intimate epic set in a Bedouin community during the Arab Revolt (the same period as “Lawrence of Arabia”), presenting a society on the cusp of change and tipping its hat to classic Westerns even in the way it toys with questions of moral absolutes.

Nowar is the latest recipient of Variety’s Arab Filmmaker of the Year award at the Abu Dhabi Film Festival.

How does the label Arab filmmaker help you and how does it hold you back?

I’ve been half-half my whole life! In »

- Jay Weissberg

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New on Video: ‘Once Upon a Time in America’

14 October 2014 5:19 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Once Upon a Time in America

Directed by Sergio Leone

Written by Leonardo Benvenuti, Piero De Bernardi, Enrico Medioli, Franco Arcalli, Franco Ferrini, Sergio Leone

Italy/USA, 1984

Widely and justly heralded for his trendsetting Spaghetti Westerns, Sergio Leone’s final and arguably most ambitious work was in another staple American genre. Like these Westerns though, this film was as much of its respective variety as it was about it. Once Upon a Time in America, with its name obviously derived from Leone’s previous Once Upon a Time in the West, is a gangster film of the highest order, and, at the same time, it recalls so many of its predecessors, from the Warner Brothers classics of the 1930s to The Godfather. This was by design. As Leone himself notes, “My film was to be an homage to the American films I love, and to America itself.”

Out now on »

- Jeremy Carr

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'Pulp Fiction' Turns 20: Quentin Tarantino's Top 12 Films (Clips)

14 October 2014 8:56 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

It's hard to believe that on this day 20 years ago, Quentin Tarantino unleashed "Pulp Fiction" onto the world. After winning the Palme d'Or at Cannes in May 1994, this unexpected masterpiece went wide on October 14 which, for an indie directed by a newcomer, was unheard of. The rest is history. As Tarantino begins his next film "The Hateful Eight" with the recently cast Jennifer Jason Leigh, and has now taken over programming at the New Beverly theater in Los Angeles, it's high time to revisit his favorite films list, a fitful collection of gore-splattered genre films, westerns and American classics. Below, brush up on your "Pulp Fiction" with a few classic clips. (And you can stream the film on Netflix.) Quentin Tarantino's Top 12 films 1. "The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" (1966, dir. Sergio Leone) 2. "Apocalypse Now" (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola) 3. "The Bad News Bears" (1976, dir. Michael Ritchie) 4. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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‘Pulp Fiction’ at 20: Why It’s the Coolest Film of the ’90s

14 October 2014 8:45 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Like a shot of adrenaline to the heart, “Pulp Fiction” changed the movie landscape when it opened on Oct. 14, 1994. Quentin Tarantino’s ode to crime and pop-culture was a bold new cinematic vision in a decade that badly needed one. Before “Pulp Fiction,” prestige films like “Dances with Wolves” and “A Few Good Men” seemed content to play it safe, while blockbusters like “Jurassic Park” and “The Fugitive” focused squarely on the mainstream. Overnight, the term ‘Tarantinoesque’ became shorthand for audaciously stylized ultra-violence and genre-bending thrills. On its 20th anniversary, here’s why “Pulp Fiction” remains the coolest movie of the ’90s.

The Soundtrack: From the rumbling reverb of Dick Dale’s surf-rock rendition of “Misirlou” to the soulful crooning of Dusty Springfield’s “Son of a Preacher Man” and the strip club sexiness of Kool & the Gang’s “Jungle Boogie,” the “Pulp Fiction” soundtrack effortlessly mixes musical styles the way the film blends genres. »

- Matthew Chernov

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Dario Argento, Iggy Pop Launch Crowdfunding Campaign for ‘The Sandman’ (Exclusive)

9 October 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Italian horror director Dario Argento has launched a crowdfunding campaign for his latest film “The Sandman” with Iggy Pop starring.

The Canadian-German production, lea by producers Daniela Tully, Jeff Rogers and Rob Heydon, is looking to raise $250,000 via the Indiegogo site.

Tully wrote the script, a contemporary thriller set in the 21st century with primal roots stemming from the dark forests of Germany with Pop portraying a serial killer. The film will also  include references to Argento’s horror films such as “Suspira” and “Deep Red.”

Producers are offering rewards such as personal messages from Argento and Pop, set tours and a role as a black-gloved killer in the film.

“I was thrilled to read the script, because I recognized right away, this one was written for me,” Argento said. “I’m so excited that for the first time in my career, I will be able to involve my fans »

- Dave McNary

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From 'Psycho' to 'Gone Girl': the best director/composer teams

5 October 2014 7:54 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

With this weekend's release of Gone Girl, director David Fincher has once again showcased the unsettling sounds of award-winning composers Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor (above). Ever since 2010's The Social Network, the duo have become a fixture of Fincher's work. The duo's deceptively minimal sound, with subtle motifs barely hiding cold electronic undercurrents, is remarkably well-suited for Fincher's trademark visual aesthetic, in which every smile and doorway can take on an air of menace if the camera lingers long enough. While he has worked with a number of composers before—most notably Howard ShoreFincher has found »

- Joshua Rivera

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Live From Delta House – Belushi and Me

3 October 2014 6:07 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

One of our favorite writers, Dennis Cozzalio, is with us again for today's Saturday Matinee. Dennis, not coincidentally, presides over one of our favorite film blogs, Sergio Leone and the Infield Fly Rule. The occasion is the premiere of Allan Arkush's commentary for John Landis' Animal House which will run this coming Monday. Dennis happened to be an extra on the film so we asked him to share his experiences. We're also pleased to present some rare production stills courtesy of Katherine Wilson, the movie's local casting director in Oregon. Enjoy! Eugene, Oregon, Fall 1977. I was a first-term freshman trying to squeak out at least a 3.0 Gpa my first time at bat at the University of Oregon. I had enrolled in the film studies department, officially proclaiming it my major, fully expecting to broaden my horizons by seeing a lot of films to which I had never had the opportunity to be exposed. »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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'Theory of Everything' composer says the precision of the piano made sense for Hawking

3 October 2014 11:27 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I expect composer Jóhann Jóhannsson will be getting hired more and more in the near future. Having come up through the documentary world, he was tapped last year for Denis Villaneuve's "Prisoners" and he ran with the ball, crafting a dynamic, layered, ominous score that really didn't get its due. That course is sure to be corrected with his work on James Marsh's Stephen Hawking biopic "The Theory of Everything," a piano-driven work that stands out as one of the film's most identifying features. I spoke to Jóhannsson not long after catching "Theory," which premiered at the Toronto Film Festival in September, and you can tell he's still warming up to this process and the attention. He's sure to garner awards traction for his work on this film, however, so he'll get used to it all soon enough. Read through our back and forth below and get to know a guy who, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Watch: Newly Restored Scene From Extended Director's Cut Of Sergio Leone's 'Once Upon A Time In America'

3 October 2014 8:31 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

You may have missed it in the midst of festival news and awards season chatter, but the extended director's cut of Sergio Leone's "Once Upon A Time In America" is now on Blu-ray. It has been a long road to get the film back to the way Leone intended it when he premiered his four-hour cut at Cannes in 1984, but after 30 years, the 251-minute version is now yours to own. It comes with 22-minutes of newly restored footage, and today you can get a peek at a little bit of that. Yahoo has a clip with Robert De Niro's Noodles talking to a cemetery director about a mausoleum, and if you're wondering about the video quality, Warner Bros. has presented high-definition scenes from previous cuts, but for whatever reason, this newly added footage has been inserted as is. Given that there isn't a lot of money these days »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Colm McCarthy interview: Peaky Blinders, Sherlock, Dr Who

30 September 2014 6:33 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We chat to director Colm McCarthy about the new series of Peaky Blinders, drunk Sherlock, and Doctor Who’s mysteries…

Warning: contains a spoiler for Spooks series 7.

As period-gangster drama Peaky Blinders returns to BBC 2 for a second series, we caught up with director Colm McCarthy (Sherlock - The Sign Of Three, Doctor Who - The Bells Of St. John, Spooks) for a chat about the mythology of the new series, working with Tom Hardy and Cillian Murphy, Matt Smith riding a motorbike up the Shard, drunken Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, and er, manual sex in 1920s night clubs...

You’ve come in to direct the second series of Peaky Blinders after its look and performances have already been established. Do you take your cues from what’s gone before or do you approach it thinking, ‘right, what am I going to change?’

Both of those things. I’ve »

- louisamellor

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New York Film Festival preview: 10 films that can make it anywhere

26 September 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

The film-festival circuit this time of year is not unlike presidential-primary season. Venice or Telluride are sort of like the Iowa caucus, an important first step for a film to generate some name recognition and Oscar buzz—but not exactly the setting for a coronation. Toronto is the traditional Oscar-campaign battleground, a sort of New Hampshire primary that often separates the contenders from the pretenders. Last year, Toronto unofficially nominated 12 Years a Slave, Gravity, and Dallas Buyers Club, and those films went on to collect major awards.

But this year, the races still remain wide open after the first new rounds, »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Interview: The Ford Brothers talk ‘The Dead’ and its sequel

23 September 2014 12:10 PM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Ahead of the Horror Channel’s UK TV premiere of the acclaimed The Dead, on Saturday 27th September at 22:50, the Ford Brothers relive the drama of the malaria-stricken shoot in Africa, revealing the budget for the first time, and talk of revenge in their next movies!

How do you two write? For example, does one pace the floor whilst the other types?

Jon: Ha that’s funny! You hit the nail on the head! Normally you will find Howard frantically writing away while I pace the room acting out the scenarios and shouting the lines like some demented theatre actor on steroids. The writing stage is one phase of the project where we work together very well. We are almost never in conflict with each other, each jumping in where the other got to in a particular scene but also bringing together our differing perspectives and weaving them together. »

- Phil Wheat

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Film Review: ‘Kundo: Age of the Rampant’

21 September 2014 11:21 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A kimchi Western with a heavy helping of spaghetti and tasty trimmings of humor, “Kundo: Age of the Rampant” delivers a thoroughly entertaining if overlong gallop through the trusty old story of honorable bandits stealing from nasty rich people and distributing the proceeds to downtrodden peasants. , “Kundo” has run rampant at the South Korean box office, and should continue to do well abroad with its high-impact action sequences and funky Tarantino-esque packaging.

Setting the all-time record for opening-day biz (but eclipsed a week later by seafaring actioner “The Admiral: Roaring Currents,” now the highest-grossing South Korean film ever made), “Kundo” is a rollicking good ride that’s marred just slightly by its tendency to linger a little too long on minor story threads here and there. But in the more critical departments of supplying well-defined heroes worth rooting for, hissable villains and an infectious spirit of fun and adventure, the film scores high marks. »

- Richard Kuipers

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Looking back at Back To The Future Part III

16 September 2014 1:52 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Back To The Future Part III isn't the most popular film in the trilogy. But Simon argues this sci-fi western deserves more love...

I don't think I'm going out on much of a limb by saying that, in general, Back To The Future Part III is the least talked about film in the trilogy. It shouldn't be, in my personal view, but it's the one that generally puts technology on the back burner, introduces a love story, and visually is the most different.

Personally, I've never thought the labelling of Back To The Future Part III as the least liked film in the series - as some have - is particular fair, though. My 10-year old would go even further. It's his favourite of the lot.

Detractors

So why then do some not warm to it as much? Well, let's deal with that, before I go onto the film in more detail. »

- ryanlambie

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See the First Part of Beyoncé and Jay Z’s Tour Film, ‘Bang Bang’

15 September 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

After getting their Spring Breakers phase out of their system, millionaire film students Jay Z and Beyoncé are exploring more classical influences. Part one of "Bang Bang," the short film that played during the couple's On the Run tour, borrows equally from Quentin Tarantino, Sergio Leone, and the French New Wave, and it's very charming in a junior-year sort of way. You can practically hear the 16mm projector. »

- Nate Jones

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Top 10 “One Last Job” Scenes

11 September 2014 4:02 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

With November Man out, excitement for Pierce Bosnan’s return to spying is at an all-time high for many James Bond fans. November Man, based on the seventh installment of Bill Granger’s book series called There Are No Spies, is about ex- CIA agent Peter Devereaux (Pierce Bosnan). While living a quiet life in Switzerland, Devereaux is ejected out of retirement for one last mission. Although the concept of the “one last mission/job” is not a new concept for Hollywood, it definitely has its place in cinema history, branching out to a wide range of reasons why our beloved characters are being pulled back into their past lives. From a retiree’s last gig, to the bad-boy-gone-good-and-then-bad-again mission, to the revenge premise, mythology of the ex-professional can surely delight and excite us to champion our heroes for one last fight. Here are scenes from ten incredible “one last job” films, »

- Christopher Clemente

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The 'Burbs and Joe Dante's gleeful suburban chaos

11 September 2014 8:38 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Through his films such as The 'Burbs and Gremlins, director Joe Dante made mischief in American suburbia, Ryan writes...

Mayfield Place is the perfect 80s suburbia. There are painted houses fringed by lush green lawns cut to just the right length, separated by a wide grey road. There are white picket fences. The neighbours are out, tending to their gardens beneath a pristine blue sky.

Thirty-something resident Ray Peterson stands in his front yard, surveys the scene, and sees that it is good.

Except this is a Joe Dante film, and things are never good for long in a Joe Dante film.

Queenie, the little white dog belonging to the old guy across the road, has just left a spire of brown poop on Mark Rumsfield's lawn. Mark, a Vietnam vet and patriot, is running around in his camo shorts, threatening to eviscerate Walter's dog. Elsewhere, Ray's schlubby neighbour Art »

- ryanlambie

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 147 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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