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1-20 of 76 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


A life in the arts: Simon Callow

23 December 2011 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

'I actually wanted to be a writer long before I wanted to be an actor'

'Dickens was the most gorgeous person you could possibly meet. He was just amazingly affable. Your day would be absolutely made if you bumped into Dickens. More than that, he possessed the power to make you funnier and more attractive. He would laugh so generously that he actually empowered you. What a gift. No wonder that even during his lifetime people knew he was one of the immortals."

Simon Callow is explaining a lifelong fascination that has led him to write about Charles Dickens, to adapt his work, and to play the man – twice in episodes of Doctor Who alone – as well as his characters on both stage and screen. It is an engagement that reaches something of a culmination next year with the Dickens bicentenary, when Callow will publish a new book about »

- Nicholas Wroe

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My favourite film: Readers' comments – week seven

21 December 2011 9:21 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

It's time for our weekly pick of your responses to our favourite film series, for which Guardian writers have selected the movies they just can't get enough of

Here's a roundup of what you thought in week seven, when the selections were The Goonies, Together, The Ladykillers, Night of the Hunter and Star Trek II – The Wrath of Kahn

My favourite film's fish and visitors moment finally arrived at the start of week seven. We'd got away with Back to the Future, slipped Predator past you in a cloak of respectability and zapped Ghostbusters's critical hot spots. Yet Matt Andrews's championing of The Goonies was a flashback too far for those suffering from nostalgia fatigue. "Is there anything edifying at this point in another Guardian contributor picking some 80s kids' movie as their favourite?" asked JohnBarnesOnToast. "The articles are basically the same (and in this instance it's not »

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Blu-ray Review: Risque, Delightful Comedy ‘Design For Living’ From Criterion

21 December 2011 9:20 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – From the very first scene, a first-silent exchange in which a beautiful woman enters a train car to see two handsome men sleeping across from her and chooses to draw them on her sketch pad before falling asleep and waking up to flirt with both of them outright, “Design For Living” is a romantic comedy masterpiece. I’m stunned to admit that I had never seen the Ernst Lubitsch risque joy but now I consider it one of my favorite Criterion editions. The movie is laugh-out-loud funny with three stars at the peak of their skills — charming, engaging, enjoyable. I’ve been doing this long enough that it’s increasingly rare to see a classic film for the first time that floors me like “Design For Living.” It’s stellar.

Blu-Ray Rating: 5.0/5.0

A painter (Gary Cooper), a playwright (Fredric March), and an artist (Miriam Hopkins) walk into a French apartment. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Movie Ink: A List of the Top Five Movie Tattoos

12 December 2011 9:08 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Top Five Movie Tattoos As David Fincher's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is making way to hit theaters on December 21, I thought it might be fun to take a look at tattoos in movies. In talking with some friends about the idea it was interesting which movie tattoos came to their minds first. Angelina Jolie's in Wanted seemed to be one everyone mentioned and Vin Diesel in xXx was another, both memorable, but neither really stood out to me. I took the question to Facebook where many people responded with four of the five tattoos that made my list along with tattoos from films such as Robert De Niro's tattoos in Cape Fear, Ed Helms' Mike Tyson tat in The Hangover Part II, Ralph Fiennes' back splash in Red Dragon, "Respect" in Nicolas Winding Refn's Pusher, The Rock's sleeve in Faster and the »

- Brad Brevet

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Movie Ink: A List of the Top Five Movie Tattoos

12 December 2011 9:08 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Top Five Movie Tattoos As David Fincher's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is making way to hit theaters on December 21, I thought it might be fun to take a look at tattoos in movies. In talking with some friends about the idea it was interesting which movie tattoos came to their minds first. Angelina Jolie's in Wanted seemed to be one everyone mentioned and Vin Diesel in xXx was another, both memorable, but neither really stood out to me. I took the question to Facebook where many people responded with four of the five tattoos that made my list along with tattoos from films such as Robert De Niro's tattoos in Cape Fear, Ed Helms' Mike Tyson tat in The Hangover Part II, Ralph Fiennes' back splash in Red Dragon, "Respect" in Nicolas Winding Refn's Pusher, The Rock's sleeve in Faster and the »

- Brad Brevet

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DVD Playhouse December 2011

11 December 2011 5:07 PM, PST | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

DVD Playhouse—December 2011

By Allen Gardner

The Rules Of The Game (Criterion) Jean Renoir’s classic from 1939 was met with a riot at its premiere and was severely cut by its distributor, available only in truncated form for two decades until it was restored to the grandeur for which it is celebrated today. A biting comedy of manners set in the upstairs and downstairs of a French country estate, the film bitterly vivisects the bourgeoisie with a gentle ferocity that will tickle the laughter in your throat. Renoir co-stars as Octave. Also available on Blu-ray disc. Bonuses: Introduction to the film by Renoir; Commentary written by scholar Alexander Sesonske and read by Peter Bogdanovich; Comparison of the film’s two endings; Selected scene analysis by Renoir scholar Chris Faulkner; Featurettes and vintage film clips; Part one of David Thomson’s “Jean Renoir” BBC documentary; Video essay; Interviews with Renoir, crew members, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Harry Morgan, 1915 - 2011

8 December 2011 2:13 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"Harry Morgan, the prolific character actor best known for playing the acerbic but kindly Colonel Potter in the long-running television series M*A*S*H, died on Wednesday morning at his home in Los Angeles," reports Michael Pollak in the New York Times. "In more than 100 movies, Mr Morgan played Western bad guys, characters with names like Rocky and Shorty, loyal sidekicks, judges, sheriffs, soldiers, thugs and police chiefs…. In The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), which starred Henry Fonda, he was praised for his portrayal of a drifter caught up in a lynching in a Western town…. He went on to appear in All My Sons (1948), based on the Arthur Miller play, with Edward G Robinson and Burt Lancaster; The Big Clock (1948), in which he played a silent, menacing bodyguard to Charles Laughton; Yellow Sky (1949), with Gregory Peck and Anne Baxter; and the critically praised western High Noon (1952), with Gary Cooper. Among »

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My favourite film: The Night of the Hunter

8 December 2011 7:37 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Peter Kimpton tops up our writers' favourite film series with an ode to Charles Laughton's 1955 thriller, a tale as dark and disquieting as a half-forgotten dream

Want to write your own review of the film? Do so here – or brave the cut-throat comments section below

Motionless for 90 minutes, I could not even remove my coat. I sweated and shivered. I felt in shock. Was the film recreating scenes from my sleep? I had never seen, as far as I can recall, The Night of the Hunter. That is until a cold, wintry night in the 1990s when, working in Glasgow, I went to the city's Gft cinema to catch a new 35mm print of Charles Laughton's 1955 masterpiece. It was his only film as a director. Critics panned it on its release, consequently killing off the actor's career behind the camera, and perhaps robbing history of further works of greatness. »

- Peter Kimpton

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TCM To Present World Television Premiere Of Stanley Kubrick.s Rarely Seen First Film, Fear And Desire

5 December 2011 5:54 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Allegorical War Drama Highlights TCM.s Dec. 14 Salute

to The George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is set to make movie history this December when it presents the world television premiere of Fear and Desire (1953), the rarely seen debut film by legendary director Stanley Kubrick. Premiering Wednesday, Dec. 14, at 8 p.m. (Et), the allegorical war drama from the director of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and The Shining (1980) will be the centerpiece of an extraordinary 24-hour marathon honoring the preservation efforts of the Motion Picture Department at George Eastman House. TCM host Robert Osborne will be joined by Jared Case, Head of Cataloguing and Access at George Eastman House, to present 15 cinematic rarities from one of the country.s leading moving-image archives.

TCM.s Dec. 14 salute to the Motion Picture Collection at George Eastman House will begin at 6:15 a.m. (Et) with The Blue Bird »

- Michelle McCue

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DVD Playhouse--November 2011

25 November 2011 10:45 AM, PST | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

DVD Playhouse—November 2011

By Allen Gardner

Tree Of Life (20th Century Fox) Terrence Malick’s latest effort is both the best film of 2011 and the finest work of his (arguably) mixed, but often masterly canon. A series of vignettes, mostly set in 1950s Texas, capture the memory of a man (Sean Penn) in present-day New York who looks back on his life, and his parents’ (Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain) troubled marriage, when word of his younger brother’s suicide reaches him. Almost indescribable beyond that, except to say no other film in history so perfectly evokes the magic and mystery of the human memory, which both crystalizes (and sometimes idealizes) the past. Like Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this is a challenging, polarizing work that you must let wash over you. If you go along for the ride, you’re in for a unique, rewarding cinematic experience. Also available on Blu-ray disc. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Blood of the Vines: The Big Clock

16 November 2011 7:23 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Time for drinks with one of our favorite films!

Note: Our Fearless Leader Joe Dante — as part of his current world tour — recently screened The Big Clock at the University of Wisconsin’s Cinematheque series.  Read more about it here. And here.

One of the most exciting nail-biters in the film noir genre, “The Big Clock” will have you wound up tighter than a cheap analog watch.  No small digital numbers here.  Crimeways Magazine likes it larger than life.

Of all the things to like about this movie, that huge timepiece in the art deco office buiding may be my favorite.  It’s like the old scoreboards of classic baseball parks.  Inside, though, instead of a guy flipping over the runs and outs, it houses a guy about to flip because his time may be running out.

In Kenneth Fearing’s book, the murder weapon is a brandy decanter, which »

- Danny

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It’s 1939 – The Hunchback Of Notre Dame

7 November 2011 6:45 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat is a monthly newspaper run by Steve DeBellis, a well know St. Louis historian, and it.s the largest one-man newspaper in the world. The concept of The Globe is that there is an old historic headline, then all the articles in that issue are written as though it.s the year that the headline is from. It.s an unusual concept but the paper is now in its 25th successful year! Steve and I collaborated last Spring on an all-Vincent Price issue of The Globe and I’ve been writing a regular monthly movie-related column since then. Since there is no on-line version of The Globe, I will be posting all of my articles here at We Are Movie Geeks. When Steve informed me that this month.s St. Louis Globe-Democrat was to take place in 1939, often labeled “Hollywood’s Greatest Year”, I knew the possibilities were immense. »

- Tom Stockman

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Island of Lost Souls: Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review

4 November 2011 10:10 AM, PDT | TheHDRoom | See recent TheHDRoom news »

In 1896, acclaimed author H.G. Wells released his novel, The Island of Dr. Moreau, a chilling tale that was equally disturbing and controversial. Since then, Hollywood has consistently tried to bring the story to the screen, often with mixed to mediocre to flat out awful results. One of these films, however, serves the original story justice while at the same time existing on its own merits and that film is 1933's Island of Lost Souls.

A long thought lost classic from the beginnings of the sound era (resurrected and brought to the High Def world by the always wonderful Criterion Collection), Island of Lost Souls is a tremendous horror/thriller that manages to work on one level as a genre picture, but also has a layer of social commentary that touches on some subjects that is still to this day a bit taboo, making it even more so in the 30's when it was released, »

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"Island Of Lost Souls" (1933) Comes To DVD And Blu-ray From Criterion

30 October 2011 3:33 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

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By Raymond Benson

What is the Law?

Not to run on all fours.

That is the Law!

Are we not men?

What is the Law?

Not to eat meat!

That is the Law!

Are we not men?

What is the Law?

Not to spill blood!

That is the Law!

Are we not men?

Well, we are not Devo, although that famed New Wave band was inspired by this wonderfully twisted 1933 science fiction-horror film in their song, “Are We Not Men?—We Are Devo!” Similarly, Danny Elfman and Oingo Boingo used parts of the “Law” in their song, “No Spill Blood.” The above mantra is used in the picture by a group of, well, unusual beings.

Made by Paramount to compete with Universal’s string of successful horror movies, and directed by Erle C. Kenton, Island of Lost Souls is nothing short of a masterpiece. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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New this Week: ‘In Time,’ ‘The Rum Diary’ and ‘Jurassic Park Ultimate Trilogy (Bd)’

26 October 2011 6:00 AM, PDT | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

AnonymousRhys IfansVanessa RedgraveDavid Thewlis

In TimeJustin TimberlakeAmanda SeyfriedCillian Murphy

Puss in BootsAntonio BanderasSalma HayekZach Galifianakis

The Rum DiaryJohnny DeppGiovanni RibisiAaron Eckhart

Movie of the Week

The Rum Diary

The Stars: Johnny DeppGiovanni RibisiAaron Eckhart

The Plot: American journalist Paul Kemp (Depp) takes on a freelance job in Puerto Rico for a local newspaper during the 1950s and struggles to find a balance between island culture and the ex-patriots who live there.

The Buzz: Where to begin? Have you seen the trailer? There’s a lot to digest in there.

In all honesty, I’d be a lot more excited than I am, (presently my excito-meter is at about a 6/10) if I’d never caught wind of the many negative rumblings about this film (I have a close »

- Aaron Ruffcorn

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DVD: DVD: Island Of Lost Souls

25 October 2011 10:03 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

“Are we not men?” a fur-covered Bela Lugosi asks a crowd of man-beasts as part of his role as Sayer Of The Law in Island Of Lost Souls, a 1932 adaptation of the H.G. Wells novel The Island Of Dr. Moreau. His audience may have an answer, but the movie doesn’t. Set on a fog-drenched island where mad scientist Charles Laughton believes that “all life is tending toward the human form” and works to speed up the process, Island Of Lost Souls is a horror film based on the premise that the divide between humanity and the animal »

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Home Invasion: DVD & Blu-Ray Releases for October 25, 2011

25 October 2011 8:40 AM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

The Tuesday before Halloween is bound to have a lot of genre titles. There are some good ones too like Attack the Block, Blue Underground releases Fulci in High-Definition with Zombie and The House by the Cemetery, also Criterion releases The Island of Lost Souls on DVD & Blu-Ray and the most talked about film of last year, A Serbian Film finally hits the shelves. Read below, if you dare, for all your DVD and Blu-Ray releases for this week and if you plan on purchasing any films through Amazon, click on the buttons provided as they help us out with paying the bills around here.

Animal Attack Two Pack (Maneaters Are Loose/ Shark Kill)

Two savage and rare TV movies in the 1970s “Animal Attack” genre that have rarely been seen since their initial release, now back in print and together at last on DVD.

Buy the DVD @ Amazon. »

- Andy Triefenbach

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A Brief History Of Horror – Psycho And The 1960s

24 October 2011 4:08 PM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

By my reckoning three masterpieces of the genre were released in 1960. All three involve a character with obsessions that eventually destroy him, but only after a string of other deaths. All three got, at best, mixed reviews on their release, as edgy horror movies almost always get. And the three stand up as proof of what the genre can be in the hands of the right artists.

The centrepiece of this triptych, of course, is Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 Psycho, which marks a turning point. Norman Bates goes in the list with Frankenstein’s monster and Nosferatu, but this time the monster had a perfectly normal, even likeable, face and voice, and an innocent charm. Many horror and crime movies since have been about characters with multiple personalities, but I struggle to think of any such movies made prior to this. Suddenly the danger had shifted from an external monster into »

- Adam Whyte

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For Love Of Celluloid

24 October 2011 1:54 AM, PDT | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

While watching the new Criterion DVD release of the exquisitely creepy Island of Lost Souls (1932), some of the black & white images photographed by Karl Struss took my breath away. There are scenes with Charles Laughton in almost complete darkness, where all we see is a tiny glint in his eye, or his face is illuminated by a cigarette match. The film is full of incredible moments like this. Talk about chiaroscuro…

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] »

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For Love Of Celluloid

23 October 2011 9:54 PM, PDT | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

While watching the new Criterion DVD release of the exquisitely creepy Island of Lost Souls (1932), some of the black & white images photographed by Karl Struss took my breath away. There are scenes with Charles Laughton in almost complete darkness, where all we see is a tiny glint in his eye, or his face is illuminated by a cigarette match. The film is full of incredible moments like this. Talk about chiaroscuro… Today, digital artists can paint any picture imaginable, as Robert Rodriguez did in his visualization of Frank Miller’s graphic novel Sin City, or Zach Snyder did in… »

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