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Jack Klugman Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (2) | Trivia (30) | Personal Quotes (9) | Salary (1)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 27 April 1922Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Date of Death 24 December 2012Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California, USA  (prostate cancer)
Birth NameJacob Joachim Klugman
Height 5' 8½" (1.74 m)

Mini Bio (1)

As a film character actor, Klugman was the epitome of the everyman. He was one of the pioneers of television acting in the 1950s, and is best remembered for his 1970s TV work as Oscar Madison on The Odd Couple (1970) and as the medical examiner on Quincy M.E. (1976).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Ray Hamel

Spouse (2)

Peggy Crosby (2 February 2008 - 24 December 2012) (his death)
Brett Somers (1953 - 15 September 2007) (her death) (2 children)

Trivia (30)

Served on the board of directors of New York's National Actor's Theatre.
Diagnosed with throat cancer, he had parts of his larynx removed, leaving his voice extremely rough and gruff in later movies, such as Dear God (1996).
Lived with Barbara Neugass from 1978 to 1992. 1 December 1999: A Los Angeles jury rejected an $881,000 palimony claim by her. She claims Jack promised her lifetime support. Their relationship ended in 1992.
Won two Emmies for The Odd Couple (1970).
Lived with Peggy Crosby. She is the ex-wife of Bing Crosby's son, Phillip Crosby.
Father of sons Adam Klugman and David Klugman. Stepfather of Leslie Klein.
Attended Carnegie-Mellon University.
He was once part owner of a racehorse named "Jaklin Klugman".
He reunited with Tony Randall on Broadway in 1998 for Neil Simon's "The Sunshine Boys".
Was nominated for Broadway's 1960 Tony Award as Best Supporting or Featured Actor (Musical) for "Gypsy".
Appears in the original film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which was remade with Jack Lemmon. Klugman later appeared in the television series, The Odd Couple (1970), which was based on the film The Odd Couple (1968) in which Lemmon co-starred as Felix Unger.

In April 2012 he performed "12 Angry Men" at the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick in another role.
As a film character actor, Klugman was the epitome of the everyman. He was one of the pioneers of television acting in the 1950s and is best remembered for his 1970s television work as Oscar Madison on The Odd Couple (1970) and as the medical examiner on Quincy M.E. (1976).
Best remembered by the public for his starring role as "Oscar Madison" on The Odd Couple (1970).
Was believed to have been involved in a long and bitter feud with actor Norman Fell that lasted over 40 years. However, it was later revealed by Klugman that he and Fell got along fine and the feud was nothing more than a friendly rivalry.
Although he separated from Brett Somers in 1974, neither ever filed for divorce.
Wed girlfriend Peggy Crosby at The Little Brown Church in Studio City, California (2 February 2008).
The last surviving juror from the cast of the original 12 Angry Men (1957), Juror number five.
Diagnosed with throat cancer in 1974, leading to vocal surgery in 1989, left Klugman's very harsh and raspy. His cancer and scratchy voice were written into several of his later film and television roles, including The Odd Couple: Together Again (1993), Dear God (1996), and Diagnosis Murder (1993).
Jack Klugman and Tony Randall performed together in Appointment with Adventure: The Pirate's House (1955), from the Golden Age of television, 15 years before they did the classic sit-com, The Odd Couple (1970).
Competed in Celebrity Challenge of the Sexes in billiards. He won the match but lost by default because he forgot to call the final shot as per the rules.
Passed away on same day as actor Charles Durning.
Jack enjoyed betting on the horses from the tender age of 15. His own thoroughbred, 'Jacklin Klugman', finished third in the 1980 Kentucky Derby.
Ended up making more money from his 10% ownership in The Odd Couple (1970) than from the $7000 per episode he received during the show's final season.
Was no stranger to hard times from birth: as a child he had been made to work as a street pedlar, and during especially lean stints in his early acting career he would sell his blood at $5 a pint.
He considered Henry Fonda to be the greatest actor he ever worked with.
Currently appearing in "The Sunshine Boys" at the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, NJ. [October 2007]
Currently appearing in James Sweet's "The Value of Names", at the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, NJ. [November 2006]
Performing one-man show "An Evening with Jack Klugman" at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank, California. Sept. 12 - Oct. 19 2003 [September 2003]

Personal Quotes (9)

[on attending rival and decades old enemy Norman Fell's funeral]: Best funeral I've ever been to. I've never laughed so hard in years. I had the time of my life.
[on people comparing him to "Oscar Madison" from The Odd Couple (1970)]: People think I'm like Oscar. When they find out I'm not, they seem disappointed.
[on his show Quincy M.E. (1976)]: We were the first CSI. All these other shows just took what we did and made it bloodier and sexier. Our show was actually about something, we had a message and a moral. You can't compare gold to tin foil. I was a one man CSI.
[on his dear friend Tony Randall]: The best friend a man could ever have. I loved him dearly. He was a gentleman in the truest sense of the word. I will miss him for the rest of my days.
[on former roommate Charles Bronson]: You remembered him. He had an amazing presence.
[on working with Tony Randall]. There's nobody better to improvise with than Tony. A script might say,"Oscar teaches Felix football". There would be four blank pages. He would provoke me into reacting to what he did. Mine was the easy part.
[on the hardships of his life] Poverty can teach lessons that privilege cannot.
[on smoking] I saw John Garfield smoke. He was my idol, so I smoked. I even smoked like him... The only really stupid thing I ever did in my life was to start smoking.
[on what made Quincy M.E. (1976) a hit] Quincy was a muckraker, like Upton Sinclair, who wrote about injustices. He was my ideal as a youngster, my author, my hero. Everybody said, 'Quincy'll never be a hit.' I said, 'You guys are wrong. He's two heroes in one, a cop and a doctor.' A coroner has power. He can tell the police commissioner to investigate a murder. I saw the opportunity to do what I'd gotten into the theater to do - give a message. They were going to do cops and robbers with 'Quincy.' I said, 'You promised me I could do causes.' They said, 'Nobody wants to see that.' I said, 'Look at the success of '60 Minutes.' They want to see it if you present it as entertainment.

Salary (1)

12 Angry Men (1957) $3,600

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