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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002

6 items from 2015


Roger Deakins Will Be Cinematographer on Villeneuve's 'Blade Runner'

20 May 2015 12:49 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

This is when everyone should finally lose their sh*t. It has been officially announced that the new Blade Runner movie, being directed by Denis Villeneuve, will feature Roger Deakins as cinematographer. What?! Deakins?! Awesome, just awesome. Roger Deakins is one of the best cinematographers working today, only rivaled by the likes of Emmanuel Lubezki or Janusz Kaminski . He has been working with Denis Villeneuve on his last two films, shooting both Prisoners and Sicario (which just premiered at Cannes) for the Quebecois filmmaker. They'll move onto Blade Runner, even though it likely won't start shooting until 2016 sometime. No other details were revealed, and the press release doesn't even mention Gosling (yet). "Roger is an extraordinary talent and we are very excited that Denis and Roger have chosen to continue their collaboration in bringing the sequel to Blade Runner to the big screen," the producers said. Here's all we do »

- Alex Billington

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100 Essential Action Scenes: Foot Chases

5 May 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sound on Sight undertook a massive project, compiling ranked lists of the most influential, unforgettable, and exciting action scenes in all of cinema. There were hundreds of nominees spread across ten different categories and a multi-week voting process from 11 of our writers. The results: 100 essential set pieces, sequences, and scenes from blockbusters to cult classics to arthouse obscurities.

Part 1 of 10: There’s nothing like the thrill of a chase. A bank robber pulls off an elaborate heist only to be pursued by a dogged detective on foot. A soldier escapes from enemy territory but must outrun the angry combatants on his tail. A man wrongly accused of murder has just his wits and his two legs to flee the authorities. It’s the immediacy that appeals: characters relying on their stamina, agility, and wit to stay alive, without the aid that a car, boat, or plane gives them. For filmmakers, »

- Shane Ramirez

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Martin Freeman And Bill Hader Rumoured For Steven Spielberg’s Bfg

6 March 2015 12:51 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

There’s definitely some new blood getting involved behind the scenes of Steven Spielberg’s upcoming adaptation of The Bfg with Deadline reporting that Walden Media are now backers on the project. They’re longtime purveyors of young people’s films that have pretty often come with Faith-positive or Christian message – like the Narnia series, for example.

Less definite than this but much more interesting is the possibility of some new names getting involved more visibly. According to a tweet from Film Divider, Bill Hader and Martin Freeman are “likely” to join the cast. There’s no indication on who they would play but I think Freeman will be a good match for Mr. Tibbs, butler at Buckingham Palace.

Officially on the roster so far are Mark Rylance as the Bfg himself, and Ruby Barnhill as his human friend, Sophie. As fans of Roald Dahl’s original novel, or even the Cosgrove Hall animated feature, »

- Brendon Connelly

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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

22 February 2015 7:29 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Cinematographers pick the best-shot films of all time

4 February 2015 12:31 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Stumbling across that list of best-edited films yesterday had me assuming that there might be other nuggets like that out there, and sure enough, there is American Cinematographer's poll of the American Society of Cinematographers membership for the best-shot films ever, which I do recall hearing about at the time. But they did things a little differently. Basically, in 1998, cinematographers were asked for their top picks in two eras: films from 1894-1949 (or the dawn of cinema through the classic era), and then 1950-1997, for a top 50 in each case. Then they followed up 10 years later with another poll focused on the films between 1998 and 2008. Unlike the editors' list, though, ties run absolutely rampant here and allow for way more than 50 films in each era to be cited. I'd love to see what these lists would look like combined, however. I imagine "Citizen Kane," which was on top of the 1894-1949 list, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Project Almanac Review

29 January 2015 2:26 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

The found footage genre is a peculiar one. It rests its laurels on building realism through the urgency and immediacy of the filmed footage. However, quite often, the characters in these films go to such extreme lengths to shoot this footage that one wonders why they are committing to capturing so much extraneous material. Every so often, a genre film will use the recordings in a chilling or original way. However, much of the time, having a character record all of the events on a video camera comes off as a contrived gimmick. The only way a film of this sort can be successful is if the story would not have worked as effectively with a regular, multi-camera staging.

The biggest problem with Project Almanac, a new sci-fi drama aimed at teens, is how rarely its writers convince us that the story should be told through the immediate presence of a video camera. »

- Jordan Adler

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002

6 items from 2015


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