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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2015


’49th Parallel’ – The best British film about Canada created to get America into the war ever made

28 April 2015 6:17 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

To begin with, no, 49th Parallel is not a Canadian film. At least not technically. The Hungarian Emeric Pressburger, who had been working in England for about five years, wrote the 1941 feature, and the Kent-born Michael Powell, who had been making films since the early 1930s, directed it. All but one interior was shot at Denham Studios in Buckinghamshire, and Ortus Films, a British company, produced the picture after the Ministry of Information commissioned it. The cast is a veritable who’s who of prominent British actors, including Laurence Olivier, Anton Walbrook, and Leslie Howard, among others. David Lean, then the preeminent editor in England, cut the picture.

Still, it is a great Canadian film. Locations range from Winnipeg to Quebec to Alberta. Perhaps more than any other film, certainly of the era, it also deals explicitly with Canada’s largely ignored involvement in World War II—as far as the movies are concerned anyway. »

- Jeremy Carr

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Terence Rattigan On Film: The Browning Version

24 March 2015 6:54 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

I. The Rattigan Version

After his first dramatic success, The Winslow Boy, Terence Rattigan conceived a double bill of one-act plays in 1946. Producers dismissed the project, even Rattigan’s collaborator Hugh “Binkie” Beaumont. Actor John Gielgud agreed. “They’ve seen me in so much first rate stuff,” Gielgud asked Rattigan; “Do you really think they will like me in anything second rate?”  Rattigan insisted he wasn’t “content writing a play to please an audience today, but to write a play that will be remembered in fifty years’ time.”

Ultimately, Rattigan paired a brooding character study, The Browning Version, with a light farce, Harlequinade. Entitled Playbill, the show was finally produced by Stephen Mitchell in September 1948, starring Eric Portman, and became a runaway hit. While Harlequinade faded into a footnote, the first half proved an instant classic. Harold Hobson wrote that “Mr. Portman’s playing and Mr. Rattigan’s writing »

- Christopher Saunders

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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Warner Home Entertainment Announces "The Golden Year Collection" Blu-ray Set

12 March 2015 7:17 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

Revisit 1939, Hollywood’s Greatest Year, with 4 New Blu-ray™ Debuts

The Golden Year Collection June 9

Features Newly Restored Blu-ray Debut of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Starring Charles Laughton, and Blu-ray Debuts of – Bette DavisDark Victory, Errol Flynn’s Dodge City and Greta Garbo’s Ninotchka. Collection also includes Gone With the Wind.

Burbank, Calif. March 10, 2015 – On June 9, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will celebrate one of the most prolific twelve months in Hollywood’s history with the 6-disc The Golden Year Collection. Leading the five-film set will be the Blu-ray debut of

The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in a new restoration which will have its world premiere at TCM’s Classic Film Festival beginning March 26 in Los Angeles. Charles Laughton and Maureen O’Hara star in Victor Hugo’s tragic tale which William Dieterle directed.

The other films featured in the Wbhe »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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Remembering Actress Wright: Made Oscar History in Unmatched Feat to This Day

4 March 2015 9:02 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright movies: Actress made Oscar history Teresa Wright, best remembered for her Oscar-winning performance in the World War II melodrama Mrs. Miniver and for her deceptively fragile, small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's mystery-drama Shadow of a Doubt, died at age 86 ten years ago – on March 6, 2005. Throughout her nearly six-decade show business career, Wright was featured in nearly 30 films, dozens of television series and made-for-tv movies, and a whole array of stage productions. On the big screen, she played opposite some of the most important stars of the '40s and '50s. It's a long list, including Bette Davis, Greer Garson, Gary Cooper, Myrna Loy, Ray Milland, Fredric March, Jean Simmons, Marlon Brando, Dana Andrews, Lew Ayres, Cornel Wilde, Robert Mitchum, Spencer Tracy, Joseph Cotten, and David Niven. Also of note, Teresa Wright made Oscar history in the early '40s, when she was nominated for each of her first three movie roles. »

- Andre Soares

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Alan Howard 1937-2015

19 February 2015 11:00 PM, PST | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Widely described as an "icon" of British theatre, the actor Alan Howard has died, aged 77. He had been suffering from pneumonia.Born in Croydon, it was almost inevitable that he would gravitate towards the stage: his father was the actor Arthur Howard and his uncle was Leslie Howard. He made his debut in front of an audience in Half In Earnest at the age of 21, and by the time he was 30 had found his "spiritual home" at the Royal Shakespeare Company.His career at the RSC spanned decades and almost countless roles, but perhaps his most significant achievement was gradually racking up all of Shakespeare's historical kings (as well as King Lear and Macbeth). His Henry IV was actually Bolingbroke in Richard II (rather than the title role in Henry IV Part I), but the feat remains an enviable one among his peers.Away from Stratford his appearances included as »

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The Most Elite Award Isn’t the Egot, It’s the Onk

4 February 2015 7:05 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The Egot is great. There’s no denying that. It’s the American entertainment grand slam, and the rarity with which it’s earned (12 people) only adds to its elite status. Tracy Jordan was right. But there’s another award mash-up that’s so elite only one person has ever done it. That award combo is the Onk, and that person is George Bernard Shaw. Shaw is the only person to win an Oscar and a Nobel Prize, and he was offered a Knighthood for good measure. Shaw earned the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1925 for — as is the case with many recipients — his overall body of work up to that point, which included a healthy amount of vibrant novels and plays that explored the human capacity for hope within a twisting satirical viewpoint of social norms. The award came on the heels of his “Saint Joan,” a moving play based on the life of Joan of »

- Scott Beggs

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2015


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