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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 1997

7 items from 2014


Crafted with Love: ‘Dr. Strangelove’ and the Cthulhu Mythos

24 March 2014 9:32 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

Written by Stanley Kubrick, Peter George, and Terry Southern

Directed by Stanley Kubrick

USA/UK, 1964

Having finished Lolita, a subversive Hollywood piece even by noirish standards, Stanley Kubrick returned to war. Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb‘s scope was more encompassing than the private torture of Paths of Glory, looking forward to the threat of apocalyptic destruction instead of a reflective portrait of immediate world wars. Instead of matching and multiplying the grave tone inherent in his previous work and the source material, Red Alert by Peter George, Kubrick opted for a brand of blacker-than-pitch humor, claiming, “The only way to tell the story was as a black comedy or, better, a nightmare comedy, where the things you laugh at most are really the heart of the paradoxical postures »

- Zach Lewis

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Full Metal Jacket and Dr. Strangelove: Kubrick’s War

28 February 2014 9:37 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

“It’s crazy how you can get yourself in a mess sometimes and not even be able to think about it with any sense and yet not be able to think about anything else” – Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick’s voice as a director and writer was so singular, so fitfully honest.  Every project seemed so richly influenced by him and the worlds he created. That world often floated somewhere between a cold brutal honesty and some kind of hyper-reality that’s uniquely his own. If you look at Kubrick’s relatively small, but no less inspiring, filmography, there are countless examples of bare examinations of human nature. Nowhere is that more obvious in his look at war and what it does to the human condition, first in the anti-war Paths of Glory, and then more prominently in Dr. Strangelove or: how I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb »

- Tressa

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Rascal

26 February 2014 5:22 AM, PST | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

A teenage boy befriends a baby raccoon in this nice little heart-warmer from Disney. Bill Mumy of Sixties TV hit Lost In Space plays Sterling, the likeable lad whose spirits are lifted after his mum passes away by a new and inquisitive four-legged friend. Veteran Sterling Hayden narrates as the grown-up Sterling while Elsa Lanchester - once the Bride of Frankenstein - also appears. »

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6 conspiracy theories that inspired sci-fi and horror movies

10 February 2014 10:14 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Odd List Ryan Lambie 12 Feb 2014 - 06:36

From faked lunar landings to invisible WWII warships, here are six conspiracy theories and the genre films they inspired...

"Fluoridation is the most monstrously conceived and dangerous communist plot we have ever had to face," Sterling Hayden's General Jack D Ripper coldly announces in Stanley Kubrick's breathtakingly funny satire, Dr Strangelove.

Ripper's conspiracy theory, that the commies are secretly trying to compromise our "precious bodily fluids", becomes his harebrained reason for unleashing a missile strike on the Ussr. And just as Ripper was inspired by this strange notion to trigger a nuclear apocalypse, so filmmakers have been inspired by conspiracy theories to make all kinds of science fiction and horror movies - some funny, some tense and absorbing, others terrifying.

Here, then, is a selection of six real-world conspiracy theories and the varied movies they inspired - and funnily enough, Stanley Kubrick »

- ryanlambie

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Rascal

3 February 2014 7:39 AM, PST | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

A teenage boy befriends a baby raccoon in this nice little heart-warmer from Disney. Bill Mumy of Sixties TV hit Lost In Space plays Sterling, the likeable lad whose spirits are lifted after his mum passes away by a new and inquisitive four-legged friend. Veteran Sterling Hayden narrates as the grown-up Sterling while Elsa Lanchester - once the Bride of Frankenstein - also appears. »

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'Dr. Strangelove' at 50: Why Stanley Kubrick's Nuclear Satire Still Matters

29 January 2014 7:30 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The ultimate punchline to the nuclear satire of "Dr. Strangelove"? As absurd as Stanley Kubrick's imaginative black comedy about World War III seemed when it opened 50 years ago this week (on January 29, 1964), it all turned out to be true.

Everything in the movie that the Pentagon said couldn't happen in real life -- from Air Force officers launching nuclear strikes without Presidential approval, to the Ussr being ready to respond with an automated doomsday system of its own -- actually could have happened. The safeguards really were as flimsy as Kubrick and his screenwriters imagined them to be. (Which begs the question: How safe are we now from a nuclear apocalypse?)

That's just one reason -- albeit the most chilling one -- that Kubrick's 50-year-old comedy holds up shockingly well today. But there are many other reasons that the aftershocks of "Dr. Strangelove" continue to have an impact.

The »

- Gary Susman

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Ten Miscastings That Worked – or Nearly Worked!

23 January 2014 11:16 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Miscasting in films has always been a problem. A producer hires an actor thinking that he or she is perfect for a movie role only to find the opposite is true. Other times a star is hired for his box office draw but ruins an otherwise good movie because he looks completely out of place.

There have been many humdinger miscastings. You only have to laugh at John Wayne’s Genghis Khan (with Mongol moustache and gun-belt) in The Conqueror (1956), giggle at Marlon Brando’s woeful upper class twang as Fletcher Christian in Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) and cringe at Dick Van Dyke’s misbegotten cockney accent in Mary Poppins (1964). But as hilarious as these miscastings are, producers at the time didn’t think the same way, until after the event. At least they add a bit of camp value to a mediocre or downright awful movie.

In rare cases, »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 1997

7 items from 2014


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