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Ian Hart Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (7) | Personal Quotes (25)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 8 October 1964Liverpool, Merseyside, England, UK
Height 5' 7¾" (1.72 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Ian Hart, born in England, began acting while a student in Liverpool, England, United Kingdom. He stumbled into acting almost accidentally, but was cast in the play "The Government Inspector". He continued to work in British theater and television, and first gained recognition for portraying John Lennon in the British film Backbeat (1994). He made many films in his native Britain, occasionally appearing in American films and TV series as well.

He has now played John Lennon three times, most recently in the television play Snodgrass, where he played a 50 year old Lennon who had left The Beatles before they became successful.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Matt Dicker

Spouse (1)

Lynn Hart (? - present) (2 children)

Trivia (7)

Twice portrayed John Lennon on film, in The Hours and Times (1991) and Backbeat (1994).
His wife is a teacher, and they have two daughters: Daisy, born in 1996 and Holly, born in 2001.
Resides in Crouch End, London, England.
Has twice played a lackey of Ralph Fiennes. In The End of the Affair (1999), he plays a private detective hired by Fiennes's character to spy on Julianne Moore. In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001), he played Professor Quirrell who allows his body to be used as a host for the spirit of Lord Voldemort (where Hart also provided the facial structure for the CG head of the role at the end of the film) - who is played in the flesh by Fiennes, beginning with Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005).
Has played both Arthur Conan Doyle (in Finding Neverland (2004)) and one of his most famous characters from the Sherlock Holmes canon, Dr. Watson (The Hound of the Baskervilles (2002) and Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Silk Stocking (2004)).
His birth name was Ian Davies but he adopted the surname "Hart" from his Everyman Theatre School friend Barbara Hart.
Lifelong best friend of David Morrisey.

Personal Quotes (25)

I hate auditions - when I'm doing them, I can't wait to get out the bleeding door.
There's a statistical theory that if you gave a million monkeys typewriters and set them to work, they'd eventually come up with the complete works of Shakespeare. Thanks to the Internet, we now know this isn't true.
I need something to do when I'm not working, or I crawl up the walls. So I've just taken up kung fu. I was looking for some kind of calming, relaxing activity. I tried yoga, but it wasn't really me.
I just wanna build momentum again. Keeping yourself in work is one thing, keeping yourself in good work's another. But if it doesn't work out, so be it. As the Taoists say, Learn to accept that which you cannot change.
Well, put it like this, if you're not a kid, you're a wizard.
My philosophy was, if I just do good work, someone will like it enough to employ me. It never made me famous. And I'm way, way too old now, mate. That boat's sailed.
I'm belligerent rather than ambitious.
You learn more doing than doing training.
I'm still working, I've got two arms, two legs, two gorgeous kids, a lovely wife. Fifteen years ago, I was homeless. So when you think about it, I'm lucky.
I was relatively technically adept. I can edit and wire up a light.
When you get to 15 and most of your teachers are priests, there's bound to be a conflict.
I'm not usually attracted to big-budget American films.
I don't know how to construct a career that'll make me famous. Except maybe get my ears pinned back, get my teeth done, and go to America. But then I'll be competing with billions of actors who haven't got false teeth, and who are 25.
Not being able to work would make me very unhappy.
Everyone should be good at what they do.
I've only used my own voice about four times on film.
Even before my audition, there were several pages missing from my script because those bits were so unbelievably secret not even I was allowed to see them.
We tend to think about fascism in terms of the Second World War.
That's what I like about Neil Jordan's films: everyone is better at what they do than you are.
I just want to be rich and famous.
I play the town taxidermist. Norman starts coming over to see my character's daughter, but he becomes fascinated by preserving dead animals. In one episode his dog dies, so I teach him how to preserve it. He becomes obsessed with taxidermy.
It's one of those things where you turn round and say 'I've moved to LA by accident. It was a happy accident, though. Santa Monica isn't bad - I can get Heinz beans and Cadbury's chocolate and PG Tips tea. You can get proper brown sauce in the shop round the corner. It's not like America and it doesn't feel too showbiz. I did see Warren Beatty the other day doing his shopping. I was thinking 'he's getting on a bit' but then I realized that he had more hair than me - and he's in his 70s.
Most good roles are written for young men. We are fixated on youth. So however much people say there is nothing wrong with being bald, the reality is once the hair is gone, you might not get the parts.
On moving to L.A.: I went to film a TV series (Luck with Dustin Hoffman, Dennis Farina and Nick Nolte) for HBO. Three months turned into nine months. Nine months turned into a year, then 18 months and so on and so on. One part led on to another. My wife and kids were never seeing me, so they moved over, too. Now they are in school over here and we've got a house in Santa Monica.
It's not any desire on my part to start playing dads, but it's a convention of drama. If you don't get the parts of young people going out to nightclubs, you have to play their fathers.

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