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1-20 of 24 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Blu-ray Review: On Criterion, The Manchurian Candidate Hits Too Close To Home

17 August 2016 6:00 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Earlier this year, the Criterion Collection released an edition of John Frankenheimer's classic political suspense thriller, The Manchurian Candidate (1962). Of course I'd seen the film many times prior to this. So many times, in fact, that when I got my copy I watched the extras and never got around to re-watching the film itself. Yet I've been thinking about this re-release ever since. As if some idea about it has been buried in my mind all these years and I've been waiting for the Queen of Hearts. So I watched it again. You may want to watch it again, or for the first time, before reading further. Based on Richard Condon's bestselling novel, The Manchurian Candidate is distinguished by the deft way it handles...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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How ‘Mr. Robot’ Star Rami Malek Used Anxiety to Carry His Breakthrough Emmys Drama

8 August 2016 3:17 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Rami Malek is in Emmy mode.

The “Mr. Robot” star just flew back to the States from London for a fitting with a stylist, an appearance on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” and a visit to the Television Critics Association Awards (where his USA Network series was named best new series).

What’s more, he’s got a new movie to prep: Malek will play the Dustin Hoffman role in a reworking of John Frankenheimer’s 1974 prison-break classic, “Papillon.”

This actor doesn’t agree to do just anything – he sets sky-high standards for himself. That’s how Malek broke through the noise on Sam Esmail’s innovative paranoid psycho-thriller “Mr. Robot.” The drama seemed to come out of nowhere, but quickly collected so many nominations and awards (Golden Globes Best Drama Series, Peabody, Critics Choice, AFI Ten Best TV, Gotham Breakthrough) that six Emmy nominations seemed inevitable.

Mr. Robot »

- Anne Thompson

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How ‘Mr. Robot’ Star Rami Malek Used Anxiety to Carry His Breakthrough Emmys Drama

8 August 2016 3:17 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Rami Malek is in Emmy mode.

The “Mr. Robot” star just flew back to the States from London for a fitting with a stylist, an appearance on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” and a visit to the Television Critics Association Awards (where his USA Network series was named best new series).

What’s more, he’s got a new movie to prep: Malek will play the Dustin Hoffman role in a reworking of John Frankenheimer’s 1974 prison-break classic, “Papillon.”

This actor doesn’t agree to do just anything – he sets sky-high standards for himself. That’s how Malek broke through the noise on Sam Esmail’s innovative paranoid psycho-thriller “Mr. Robot.” The drama seemed to come out of nowhere, but quickly collected so many nominations and awards (Golden Globes Best Drama Series, Peabody, Critics Choice, AFI Ten Best TV, Gotham Breakthrough) that six Emmy nominations seemed inevitable.

Mr. Robot »

- Anne Thompson

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[Locarno Review] Donald Cried

5 August 2016 10:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Donald Cried opens in medias res on Peter (Jesse Wakeman), in a cab ride through a snowy suburb, realizing that he lost his wallet, and from there gives successive details of him present due to the death of his grandmother and this, our setting, being his childhood home in small-town Rhode Island — a good omen for this comedy being in the milieu of the Farrelly brothers.

A Wall Street type, he calls a Manhattan connection who, unfortunately, is unwilling to wire him the $100 necessary to get through the day, forcing him to turn to high school friend Donald (Kris Avedisian, also the film’s director) for help after by chance encountering him in the driveway. The first instance of this film’s ample physical comedy comes when Donald, in his bathrobe, climbs over a mound of snow to embrace Peter; you see he’s been waiting twenty years for this moment. »

- Ethan Vestby

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It Came From The Tube: Tales From The Crypt (1989 – 1996)

3 July 2016 9:50 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

“Hello, Boils and Ghouls” was a typical opening salvo from The Crypt Keeper, the wraparound host (and animatronic cadaver) of HBO’s inventive, creepy and more often than not, mordantly funny salute to the EC Comics of yesteryear, Tales from the Crypt (1989 – 1996). Throughout seven seasons, viewers were subjected to as much gore, nudity, and twisted morality as we could handle. God (or his underworld counterpart) bless premium cable.

Tales ran from June 10th, 1989 to July 19th, 1996, for a grand total of 93 episodes. That’s a lot of grue to ingest, and until ratings started to slip by Season Six, horror fans found it easy to lap up. And as with any anthology series, mileage varies and quality flickers to and fro – but Tales from the Crypt’s success is anchored in the very fact that it was allowed to live, and thrive, for as long as it did.

The show »

- Scott Drebit

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Attica Prison Riot & Cover-Up Movie Developed By Good Fear Film

30 June 2016 3:08 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Attica Prison riot in 1971 is one of the most well-known and significant prisoner uprisings in American history, as 1,000 inmates rioted and seized control of the prison, taking 42 hostages in the process, in order to demand better living conditions and political rights. When the uprising was over, 43 people were dead, including 10 correctional officers and 33 inmates, and the state began a massive cover up of the true events.

Read More: Career Moves: Casey Bloys Upped at HBO, Chris Bender Starts Up Good Fear

Now, Deadline reports that Good Fear Film’s Chris Bender and Jake Weiner will bring the story of Attica and its aftermath to the big screen. The film will tell the story of Frank “Big Black” Smith, the coach of prison football team and was chief of inmate security during the riot; after the riot was over, Smith was implicated as a ring leader and was tortured by »

- Vikram Murthi

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Where’s It All Going? The Future of Cinema, Branded Content, and Journalism from Northside

17 June 2016 6:36 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Citing no shortage of innovation in the film festival space in the New York City area — with the Brooklyn Film Festival and Art of Brooklyn Film Festival also occurring during the same week — Williamsburg’s annual Northside Festival, the music and innovation conference phased out its film section in favor of “content.” Content, though, seems to be a rather loaded proposition and Northside’s Content Festival offered a glimpse inside how indie filmmakers can make a living.

The content side of the festival, making its debut in advance of the festival’s music and innovation portions, seemed more like a direct offshoot of innovation rather than the evolution of what had been the film section. Innovation in the content space seems to be defined by virtual reality and branded content. One thing the talks were short on were independent content makers, apart from Lex Dreitser, an independent Vr maker who »

- John Fink

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Shield for Murder

10 June 2016 7:33 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Dirty cops were a movie vogue in 1954, and Edmond O'Brien scores as a real dastard in this overachieving United Artists thriller. Dreamboat starlet Marla English is the reason O'Brien's detective kills for cash, and then keeps killing to stay ahead of his colleagues. And all to buy a crummy house in the suburbs -- this man needs career counseling. Shield for Murder Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1954 / B&W / 1:75 widescreen / 82 min. / Street Date June 21, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Edmond O'Brien, Marla English, John Agar, Emile Meyer, Carolyn Jones, Claude Akins, Herbert Butterfield, Hugh Sanders, William Schallert, Robert Bray, Richard Deacon, David Hughes, Gregg Martell, Stafford Repp, Vito Scotti. Cinematography Gordon Avil Film Editor John F. Schreyer Original Music Paul Dunlap Written by Richard Alan Simmons, John C. Higgins from the novel by William P. McGivern <Produced by Aubrey Schenck, (Howard W. Koch) Directed by Edmond O'Brien, Howard W. Koch

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Here's the kind of '50s movie we love, an ambitious, modest crime picture that for its time had an edge. In the 1950s our country was as blind to the true extent of police corruption as it was to organized crime. Movies about bad cops adhered to the 'bad apple' concept: it's only crooked individuals that we need to watch out for, never the institutions around them. Thanks to films noir, crooked cops were no longer a film rarity, even though the Production Code made movies like The Asphalt Jungle insert compensatory scenes paying lip service to the status quo: an imperfect police force is better than none. United Artists in the 1950s helped star talent make the jump to independent production, with the prime success stories being Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. But the distribution company also funded proven producers capable of putting out smaller bread 'n' butter movies that could prosper if costs were kept down. Edward Small, Victor Saville, Levy-Gardner-Laven. Aubrey Schenck and Howard C. Koch produced as a team, and for 1954's Shield for Murder Koch co-directed, sharing credit with the film's star, Edmond O'Brien. The show is a smart production all the way, a modestly budgeted 'B' with 'A' ambitions. O'Brien was an industry go-getter trying to channel his considerable talent in new directions. His leading man days were fading but he was in demand for parts in major films like The Barefoot Contessa. The producers took care with their story too. Writers Richard Alan Simmons and John C. Higgins had solid crime movie credits. Author William P. McGivern wrote the novel behind Fritz Lang's The Big Heat as well as Rogue Cop and Odds Against Tomorrow. All of McGivern's stories involve crooked policemen or police corruption. Shield for Murder doesn't tiptoe around its subject matter. Dirty cop Detective Lt. Barney Nolan (O'Brien) kills a hoodlum in an alley to steal $25,000 of mob money. His precinct boss Captain Gunnarson (Emile Meyer) accepts Barney's version of events and the Asst. D.A. (William Schallert) takes the shooting as an open and shut case. Crime reporter Cabot (Herbert Butterfield) has his doubts, and lectures the squad room about the abuse of police power. Barney manages to placate mob boss Packy Reed (Hugh Sanders), but two hoods continue to shadow him. Barney's plan for the money was to buy a new house and escape the rat race with his girlfriend, nightclub cashier Patty Winters (Marla English). But a problem surfaces in the elderly deaf mute Ernst Sternmueller (David Hughes), a witness to the shooting. Barney realizes that his only way forward is to kill the old man before he can tell all to Det. Mark Brewster (John Agar), Barney's closest friend. Once again one of society's Good Guys takes a bite of the forbidden apple and tries to buck the system. Shield for Murder posits an logical but twisted course of action for a weary defender of the law who wants out. Barney long ago gave up trying to do anything about the crooks he can't touch. The fat cat Packy Reed makes the big money, and all Barney wants is his share. Barney's vision of The American Dream is just the middle-class ideal, the desirable Patty Winters and a modest tract home. He's picked it out - it sits partway up a hill in a new Los Angeles development, just finished and already furnished. Then the unexpected witness shows up and everything begins to unravel; Barney loses control one step at a time. He beats a mob thug (Claude Akins) half to death in front of witnesses. When his pal Mark Brewster figures out the truth, Barney has to use a lot of his money to arrange a getaway. More mob trouble leads to a shoot-out in a high school gym. The idea may have been for the star O'Brien to coach actors John Agar and Marla English to better performances. Agar is slightly more natural than usual, but still not very good. The gorgeous Ms. English remains sweet and inexpressive. After several unbilled bits, the woman often compared to Elizabeth Taylor was given "introducing" billing on the Shield for Murder billing block. Her best-known role would be as The She-Creature two years later, after which she dropped out to get married. Co-director O'Brien also allows Emile Meyer to go over the top in a scene or two. But the young Carolyn Jones is a standout as a blonde bargirl, more or less expanding on her small part as a human ashtray in the previous year's The Big Heat. Edmond O'Brien is occasionally a little to hyper, but he's excellent at showing stress as the trap closes around the overreaching Barney Nolan. Other United Artists budget crime pictures seem a little tight with the outdoors action -- Vice Squad, Witness to Murder, Without Warning -- but O'Brien and Koch's camera luxuriates in night shoots on the Los Angeles streets. This is one of those Blu-rays that Los Angelenos will want to freeze frame, to try to read the street signs. There is also little downtime wasted in sidebar plot detours. The gunfight in the school gym, next to an Olympic swimming pool, is an action highlight. The show has one enduring sequence. With the force closing in, Barney rushes back to the unfinished house he plans to buy, to recover the loot he's buried next to its foundation. Anybody who lived in Southern California in the '50s and '60s was aware of the massive suburban sprawl underway, a building boom that went on for decades. In 1953 the La Puente hills were so rural they barely served by roads; the movie The War of the Worlds considered it a good place to use a nuclear bomb against invading Martians. By 1975 the unending suburbs had spread from Los Angeles, almost all the way to Pomona. Barney dashes through a new housing development on terraced plots, boxy little houses separated from each other by only a few feet of dirt. There's no landscaping yet. Even in 1954 $25,000 wasn't that much money, so Barney Nolan has sold himself pretty cheaply. Two more latter-day crime pictures would end with ominous metaphors about the oblivion of The American Dream. In 1964's remake of The Killers the cash Lee Marvin kills for only buys him a patch of green lawn in a choice Hollywood Hills neighborhood. The L.A.P.D. puts Marvin out of his misery, and then closes in on another crooked detective in the aptly titled 1965 thriller The Money Trap. The final scene in that movie is priceless: his dreams smashed, crooked cop Glenn Ford sits by his designer swimming pool and waits to be arrested. Considering how well things worked out for Los Angeles police officers, Edmond O'Brien's Barney Nolan seems especially foolish. If Barney had stuck it out for a couple of years, the new deal for the L.A.P.D. would have been much better than a measly 25 grand. By 1958 he'd have his twenty years in. After a retirement beer bash he'd be out on the road pulling a shiny new boat to the Colorado River, like all the other hardworking cops and firemen enjoying their generous pensions. Policemen also had little trouble getting house loans. The joke was that an L.A.P.D. cop might go bad, but none of them could be bribed. O'Brien directed one more feature, took more TV work and settled into character parts for Jack Webb, Frank Tashlin, John Ford, John Frankenheimer and finally Sam Peckinpah in The Wild Bunch, where he was almost unrecognizable. Howard W. Koch slowed down as a director but became a busy producer, working with Frank Sinatra for several years. He eventually co-produced Airplane! The Kl Studio Classics Blu-ray of Shield for Murder is a good-looking B&W scan, framed at a confirmed-as-correct 1:75 aspect ratio. The picture is sharp and detailed, and the sound is in fine shape. The package art duplicates the film's original no-class sell: "Dame-Hungry Killer-Cop Runs Berserk! The first scene also contains one of the more frequently noticed camera flubs in film noir -- a really big boom shadow on a nighttime alley wall. Kino's presentation comes with trailers for this movie, Hidden Fear and He Ran All the Way. On a scale of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor, Shield for Murder Blu-ray rates: Movie: Good Video: Very Good Sound: Excellent Supplements: Trailers for Shield for Murder, Hidden Fear, He Ran All the Way Deaf and Hearing Impaired Friendly? N0; Subtitles: None Packaging: Keep case Reviewed: June 7, 2016 (5115murd)

Visit DVD Savant's Main Column Page Glenn Erickson answers most reader mail: dvdsavant@mindspring.com

Text © Copyright 2016 Glenn Erickson

»

- Glenn Erickson

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Piper Laurie: The Hollywood Interview

9 June 2016 11:42 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Piper Laurie Keeps Her Chin Up

By Alex Simon

Few living actors can claim to have experienced the Hollywood machine in all its iterations more than three-time Oscar nominee Piper Laurie. Signed by Universal Pictures at 17, their youngest contract player in years, she was in the last generation that were part of the Hollywood “factory,” pushed into “cheesecake” roles that accented physical attributes, as opposed to talent. It was the beginning of a journey.

She was born Rosetta Jacobs in Detroit, Michigan, on January 22, 1932, to immigrant parents of Polish and Russian Jewish descent. When she was still five, the family sent her and her sister to a children’s sanatorium in the mountains to see if her sister’s asthma could be cured. Three years later after being reunited with her family she decided she wanted to become an actress and studied with Benno and Betomi Schneider for several years »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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AFI Honoree John Williams Looks Back on Six Decades of Iconic Themes

9 June 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Star Wars.” “E.T.” “Jaws.” “Indiana Jones.” “Superman.” “Harry Potter.”

Admit it: You can’t think of any one of those films without hearing the score in your head.

John Williams, who wrote all those classic themes [and dozens more] will receive the American Film Institute’s Life Achievement Award on June 9 from frequent collaborator Steven Spielberg. It will be the first such honor given to a composer in the 44-year history of the award.

“This man’s gifts echo, quite literally, through all of us, around the world and across generations,” says AFI president-ceo Bob Gazzale. “There’s not one person who hasn’t heard this man’s work, who hasn’t felt alive because of it. That’s the ultimate impact of an artist.”

Over six decades in Hollywood, Williams has written some of the most memorable music in movie history. His 100-plus features have earned 50 Academy Award nominations [making him the most-nominated living person] and he’s won five times. »

- Jon Burlingame

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Hudson Hawk at 25

28 May 2016 11:16 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

If there is a reliable truism that can coexist alongside the American film industry’s dance of death with economically insane budgets that now routinely soar north of $200 million, it is that (most) critics and potential ticket-buyers can be counted on to review bad buzz and publicized woes of dollars and production instead of the actual movie once it finally finds its way to a screen. And it may in fact be true that the drama behind the scenes often outstrips the quality of the wide-screen finished product, though certainly this is not always the case. The reception of big-budget box-office flops like John Carter, The Lone Ranger, Jupiter Ascending and Oliver Stone’s Alexander are but some late examples of our number-crunching obsession with pop culture minutiae and the fascination of a behemoth’s preordained fall. Most who trudged out to see any of these films during their theatrical »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 38 – The Manchurian Candidate

24 May 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark, Aaron and Paul Cobb look at John Frankenheimer’s political thriller, The Manchurian Candidate. We explore the originality and how it influenced other paranoia films, how it spoke to the spirit of the 1960s, as a satire towards McCarthyism, and how it has remained relevant throughout the years.

About the film:

The name John Frankenheimer became forever synonymous with heart-in-the-throat filmmaking when this quintessential sixties political thriller was released. Set in the early fifties, this razor-sharp adaptation of the novel by Richard Condon concerns the decorated U.S. Army sergeant Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey), who as a prisoner during the Korean War is brainwashed into becoming a sleeper assassin in a Communist conspiracy, and a fellow Pow (Frank Sinatra) who slowly uncovers the sinister plot. In an unforgettable performance, Angela Lansbury plays Raymond’s villainous mother, the controlling wife of a witch-hunting anti-Communist senator with his eyes on the White House. »

- Aaron West

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The Gallant Hours

15 April 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Director Robert Montgomery's last is a war movie like no other, a study in leadership and command with no combat scenes. James Cagney uses none of his standard personality mannerisms; the result is something very affecting. And that music! You'll think the whole show is the memory of a soul in heaven. The Gallant Hours Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1960 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 115 min. / Street Date April 5, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring James Cagney, Dennis Weaver, Ward Costello, Vaughn Taylor, Richard Jaeckel, Les Tremayne, Walter Sande, Karl Swenson, Leon Lontoc, Robert Burton, Carleton Young, Raymond Bailey, Harry Landers, Richard Carlyle, James Yagi, James T. Goto, Carl Benton Reid, Selmer Jackson, Frank Latimore, Nelson Leigh, Herbert Lytton, Stuart Randall, William Schallert, Arthur Tovey, John Zaremba. Cinematography Joseph MacDonald Art Director Wiard Ihnen Original Music Roger Wagner Written by Beirne Lay Jr., Frank D. Gilroy Produced and Directed by Robert Montgomery »

- Glenn Erickson

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The Walking Dead: Greg Nicotero interview

5 April 2016 11:15 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Director and veteran movie SFX artist Greg Nicotero chats about making The Walking Dead, working with Quentin Tarantino and more...

Here be spoilers for The Walking Dead season 6B. Nb: interview took place before the finale had aired

For any self-respecting horror fan, Greg Nicotero is a legend. Cutting his early blood-stained teeth working as a makeup artist under Tom Savini and George Romero, he’s worked (as you’ll read below) with just about every great genre director and has gone on to become, for many of us, the strongest episode director of The Walking Dead.

In town to talk all things walker-related, we sat down to discuss the fusion of his directorial style with his superlative and endlessly creative special effects. His enthusiasm for his work was a joy to behold and you suspect that given free rein, he could talk endlessly about his experiences »

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The Manchurian Candidate

22 March 2016 11:56 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

It's the classic paranoid conspiracy that won't go away... and that seems less impossible with every passing year. Laurence Harvey is a remote-controlled assassin, and Frank Sinatra seems to be under a little hypnotic influence himself... or are we just imagining it? John Frankenheimer and George Axelrod concoct a masterpiece from the novel by Richard Condon, a movie about conspiracies, that may be hiding more secrets in plain sight. The Manchurian Candidate Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 803 1962 / B&W / 1:75 widescreen / 126 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 15, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, Janet Leigh, Angela Lansbury, Henry Silva, James Gregory, Leslie Parrish, John McGiver, Khigh Dhiegh Cinematography Lionel Lindon Production Designer Richard Sylbert Film Editor Ferris Webster Original Music David Amram Written by George Axelrod from the novel by Richard Condon Produced by George Axelrod, John Frankenheimer, Howard W. Koch Directed by John Frankenheimer

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson »

- Glenn Erickson

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Michael Collins

19 March 2016 12:05 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

On the centennial of the Easter Uprising and just a few days past St. Patrick's Day, Whv present's Neil Jordan's biopic epic of Ireland's most beloved patriotic hero -- a militant who stood up to the English occupiers. It's the role that should have cemented Liam Neeson's stardom. Michael Collins Blu-ray The Warner Archive Collection 1996 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 132 min. / Street Date March 22, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Liam Neeson, Aidan Quinn, Julia Roberts, Alan Rickman, Stephen Rea, Brendan Gleeson, Charles Dance, Jonathan Rhys Myers, Ian McElhinney. Cinematography Chris Menges Film Editors J. Patrick Duffner, Tony Lawson Original Music Elliott Goldenthal Produced by Stephen Wooley Written and Directed by Neil Jordan

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Irish politics must be in ascendance, as this St. Patrick's Day Warner Bros. has bumped its Irish patriot biopic up to Blu-ray status. A DVD of it came out only a year before. It's »

- Glenn Erickson

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Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Carol,’ ‘Brooklyn,’ ‘The Big Short,’ and More

15 March 2016 9:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Big Short (Adam McKay)

Co-writer / director Adam McKay made a genuine Adam McKay film with The Big Short. The director of Step Brothers isn’t exactly known for drama, but his outrageous sense of humor serves this fierce, angry, high-stakes tale of outsiders. In exploring the recent financial crisis in a way that’s entertaining, funny, and shocking to watch unfold, The Big Short is the rare example of a film built entirely on exposition that can still work. »

- TFS Staff

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The Challenge | Blu-ray Review

8 March 2016 11:15 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

John Frankenheimer ended a three year hiatus following his 1979 environmental horror/creature feature Prophecy with a commendable martial-arts effort, The Challenge (1982). Starring Scott Glenn in his first lead performance, the curiosity was co-written by John Sayles and also stars Japanese legend Toshiro Mifune (who had previously appeared in Frankenheimer’s 1966 film, Grand Prix). Though it ultimately proves to be a nonsensical narrative in its clash of East meets West and traditional values threatened by the consumer cravings of the modernized world, some fantastic fight sequences (a pre-fame Steven Seagal served as technical advisor) and superb lensing from famed cinematographer Kozo Okazaki mark the title as worthy of recuperation for its conglomeration of vintage components.

In 1982 Los Angeles, a down and out boxer, Rick Murphy (Glenn) is approached to transport a sacred sword to Kyoto in order to restore it to its rightful owner, a master samurai, Toru Yoshida (Mifune). Apparently, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Class | Blu-ray Review

8 March 2016 6:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

A prolific screenwriter who emerged from the late 1970s as a promising American film director, Lewis John Carlino wouldn’t get behind the camera following his third, and least successfully received feature, Class (1983), an item which, in passing, looks to have the stamp of John Hughes and the Brat Pack all over it. Aggravating in its considerable inconsistencies, this was the director’s first attempt to film a treatment he didn’t write or adapt himself, scripted by Jim Kouf and David Greenwalt (both writers who would move into mainstream film and television). The result is a rather wishy-washy prep school version of The Graduate, but the comparison is merely a pale echo, trapped inside a banal resolution with troubling misogynist tendencies.

Immediately upon meeting his new roommate Skip (Rob Lowe) at prep-school, Johnathan (Andrew McCarthy) is thrust into a rigorous new environment. Initial misgivings are set aside for a »

- Nicholas Bell

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Antony Gibbs, Editor of ‘Dune,’ ‘Fiddler on the Roof,’ Dies at 90

2 March 2016 11:11 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Antony Gibbs, a British-born film editor who cut dozens of pictures, including such ’60s classics as “Tom Jones” as well as “Fiddler on the Roof,” “Rollerball,” “Dune” and “Ronin,” died February 26. He was 90.

The Guild of British Film and Television Editors reported his death on Facebook.

Gibbs was nominated for four of the American Cinema Editors’ Eddie Awards, including for “Tom Jones” in 1964 and “Fiddler on the Roof” in 1972. He won Eddies in 1998 for his work on John Frankenheimer’s TNT miniseries “George Wallace,” starring Gary Sinise, and in 2002 for his editing of Mark Rydell’s TNT TV movie “James Dean,” starring James Franco (a film for which he also picked up an Emmy nomination). Also in 2002, he received an Ace career achievement award.

The Ace said of Gibbs in 2002: “With ‘Reindeer Games’  he continued his successful collaboration with John Frankenheimer, but his friend director Mark Rydell allowed Tony to »

- Carmel Dagan

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