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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 43 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Amid Festival Reindeer Games, Telluride Keeps On Keeping On

19 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Robert Redford often admits that the Sundance Film Festival has been “a victim of its own success,” referring to press inundation at the event over the years. For Telluride, it was the festival’s steady rise as a launching pad for awards season power players that attracted increasing media numbers (ahem). But that kind of attention is admittedly antithetical to the goals of the annual cinephile retreat.

So I put the question to Telluride executive director Julie Huntsinger bluntly when we spoke earlier this week about the 2015 lineup. Would she and co-founder Tom Luddy have preferred folks like me stay away?

“No,” she exclaims. “I think the discussions that sometimes happen about the awards derby, I kind of wish those weren’t going on. But they’re happening anyway and who are we to say one thing or another about it? This little secret on the mountain has been doing »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Bruce Dern To Appear At "Wild River" 50th Anniversary Screening, L.A., September 17

30 August 2015 10:51 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

Elia Kazan’s 1960 film Wild River, which stars Montgomery Clift, Lee Remick, Joan Van Fleet, and is Bruce Dern’s debut film, celebrates its 55th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 110-minute film on Thursday, September 17th, 2015 at 7:30 pm. Actor Bruce Dern is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Wild River (1960), set in Depression-era America, tells a provocative story of the conflict between an agent from the Tennessee Valley Authority and a proud, defiant older woman who refuses to sell her land in order to make way for a much needed dam. Oscar-nominated actors Montgomery Clift and Lee Remick star, and Oscar-winning actress Jo Van Fleet (only 40 at the time she made the film) plays the stubborn, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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19 actors who threw their own movies under the bus: "The film was terrible. But the house it built is terrific"

21 August 2015 4:01 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Some films are bad. In fact some films are so bad, even the actors promoting them can't deny just how bad they are, as these cinematic turncoats prove...

1. George Clooney: "I think we might have killed the franchise."

Film: Batman & Robin (1997)

Box office: $238.2 million

Rotten Tomatoes rating: 11%

"My phone rang, and the head of Warner Bros said, 'Come into my office, you are going to play Batman in a Batman film' and I said, 'Yeah!' I called my friends and they screamed and I screamed and we couldn't believe it!

"I just thought the last one had been successful so I thought I was just going to be in a big successful franchise movie. I think we might have killed the franchise."

2. Arnold Schwarzenegger: "It's the worst film I have ever made."

Film: Red Sonja (1985)

Box office: $6.9 million

Rotten Tomatoes rating: 15%

"It's the worst film I have ever made. »

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Lance Henriksen: The Hollywood Interview

10 August 2015 5:30 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Lance Henriksen: A Survivor’s Tale

A seminal event happened to actor Lance Henriksen in his late teens that serves as the perfect metaphor for his life: Henriksen was working at a rural New Mexico gas station, and was taken in by the couple who owned it. They had a teenage daughter a couple years his junior. One day, figuring Lance and his daughter were getting a bit too chummy; the man drove Henriksen out to the middle of the desert. “All winter long, the frost has been pushing up these beautiful amethyst stones,” the man explained. “I’ll drop you off and you can collect them, then come back and sell them for a lot of money.” Henriksen stayed half the night, and then started to succumb to the desert’s freezing temperatures. “I dug a hole and buried myself up to my chest, with a fire in front of me. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Prime Cut | Blu-ray Review

28 July 2015 6:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Lovers of odd and neglected vintage cinema can rejoice in the repackaging of Michael Ritchie’s weird sophomore title, Prime Cut. With all the menace of a Dick Francis novel and a perverse comedic streak akin to the tastes of John Waters, this misbegotten feature hasn’t received the notable following it deserves for one glaring reason—it’s increasingly warped treatment of women, which may have seemed enlightened for the period, but eventually only adds to the problematic misogyny that never abates. As far as its handling of more sensational, exploitational elements, Ritchie and screenwriter Robert Dillon manage to smooth its edges with breakneck pacing, sarcastic repartee, and a handful of impressively orchestrated face-offs.

The head of the Irish mob in Chicago hires Nick Devlin (Lee Marvin), an enforcer, to travel to Kansas City and collect money he’s owed by Mary Ann (Gene Hackman), the man who runs »

- Nicholas Bell

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Self/less review – Tarsem Singh’s dopey sci-fi romp

19 July 2015 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This identity-swap sci-fi drama fails on every level, in spite of Ben Kingsley and Ryan Reynolds in the central roles

Ben Kingsley gets joint top billing but takes an early bath in this tiresome tale of an ageing executive who pays to have his dying soul transplanted into the body of a younger man. Enter Ryan Reynolds as the empty vessel into which Sir Ben’s spirit is magnetically injected – only to discover that this new body has a mind and memory of its own. Or, as Derek Luke puts it: “You thought you were buying a new car, turns out it has a few miles on the clock.” Recycling riffs from John Frankenheimer’s superior 1966 thriller Seconds (which in turn inspired Face/Off), Tarsem Singh’s dopey romp signally fails to mine the identity-swap promise of its premise. David and Alex Pastor’s script may be lumpen, but Reynolds »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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July 14th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include It Follows, Ex MacHina, Howling II

13 July 2015 9:39 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

July 14th may not have a lot of genre-related titles arriving on DVD and Blu-ray, but the films making their home entertainment debuts this week are a rather stellar bunch nonetheless. For anyone who may have missed two of the best indie films this year in theaters—Ex Machina and It Follows—you’ll have a chance to catch up with both this coming Tuesday.

Scream Factory is also keeping busy this week with their high-def release of Philippe Mora’s cult classic, Howling II: Your Sister is a Werewolf, and they also have two double feature Blu-rays coming out as well. Severin Films has put together an extensive special edition release of the recent documentary Lost Soul, which follows the troubled production of Richard Stanley’s Island of Doctor Moreau and looks pretty incredible and for all you X-Men fans out there, the Rogue Cut version of Days »

- Heather Wixson

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Self/Less – The Review

9 July 2015 7:25 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Body/mind transference, the central idea behind the thriller Self/Less, is so flush with opportunity that it’s frustrating to see this new movie fly off the rails so early and so completely. Self/Less has the premise for thought-provoking science-fiction, but it doesn’t have the gumption. It would rather be a blockbuster than a mind-bender but it turns out to be neither. Ben Kingsley stars as Damian Hale, a miserly real-estate magnate at death’s door who pays a quarter million dollars for the services of the shadowy corporation known as ‘Phoenix Biogenics’ (we know he’s rich because he’s shown in his Trump-style penthouse complete with solid gold doors and bannister). Albright (Matthew Goode), Phoenix’s spiffy young chief, offers his clients ‘Shedding’, a process of transferring the mind from the old and sick body into a healthy younger human grown organically in their lab. »

- Tom Stockman

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‘Self/less’ Reviews: Ryan Reynolds, Ben Kingsley Saddled With ‘Boneheaded’ Plot

8 July 2015 12:42 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Despite charismatic leads Ryan Reynolds and Ben Kingsley, science-fiction thriller “Self/less” hasn’t charmed critics. Focus Features’ newest flick has a 30 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with some reviewers denouncing its underdeveloped script and others pardoning Reynolds for his inability to execute a solid performance. Alonso Duralde wrote in his review for TheWrap: “Ben Kingsley plays a New York real estate mogul who pays big bucks to have his consciousness microwaved into Ryan Reynolds‘ body in ‘Self/less,’ but the real reheating of leftovers has already occurred: this new science-fiction thriller borrows the foundation of a much better film »

- Kathy Zerbib

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John Frankenheimer: A Remembrance

6 July 2015 12:37 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Director John Frankenheimer.

I'm often asked which, out of the over 600 interviews I've logged with Hollywood's finest, is my favorite. It's not a tough answer: John Frankenheimer.

We instantly clicked the day we met at his home in Benedict Canyon, and spent most of the afternoon talking in his den. A friendship of sorts developed over the years, with visits to his office for screenings of the old Kinescopes he directed for shows like "Playhouse 90" during his salad days in live television during the 1950s.

We hadn't spoken for nearly a year in mid-2002 when the phone rang. It was John, who spoke in what can only be described as a "stentorian bark," like a general. "Alex!" he exclaimed. "John Frankenheimer." He could sense something was amiss with me. It was. My screenwriting career had stalled. My marriage was progressing to divorce. I had hit bottom. John knew that »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Robert Evans: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

5 July 2015 1:02 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Producer Robert Evans, circa 1970s, in the documentary The Kid Stays in the Picture.

Robert Evans: The Kid Is Alright

By

Alex Simon

I interviewed legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans in 2002 for Venice Magazine, in conjunction with the release of the documentary "The Kid Stays in the Picture," adapted from his iconic autobiography and audiobook. Our chat took place at Woodland, Evans' storied estate in Beverly Hills, in his equally famous screening room, which mysteriously burned down a couple years later. Evans was still physically frail, having recently survived a series of strokes, but his mind, his wit and his charm were sharp as ever, with near total recall for people, places and stories. Many, many stories. Here are a few of them.

It’s a widely-held belief that the years 1967-76 represent the “golden age” of American cinema. Just look at a few of these titles: Rosemary’s Baby, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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‘Self/less’ Review: Ryan Reynolds Shares Ben Kingsley’s Brain in Point/less Thriller

4 July 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Ben Kingsley plays a New York real estate mogul who pays big bucks to have his consciousness microwaved into Ryan Reynolds‘ body in “Self/less,” but the real reheating of leftovers has already occurred: this new science-fiction thriller borrows the foundation of a much better film — John Frankenheimer’s 1966 “Seconds” — and strips it of any larger meaning. Director Tarsem Singh, previously known for such art-direction extravaganzas as “The Fall” and “Immortals,” seems determined to prove that he can handle more mundane material that doesn’t call for as much visual flair. The film he has crafted from the script by. »

- Alonso Duralde

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Film Review: ‘Self/less’

4 July 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A brand new you that just might be the old someone else is the quandary at the center of “Self/less,” an initially intriguing parable about man’s lust for immortality that quickly devolves into a substandard shoot-’em-up designed to rebrand star Ryan Reynolds as a brawny action hero in the Jason Statham mold. But even the resourceful, likable Reynolds is at a loss to elevate this rather dreary piece of would-be escapism, which calls out for the wry, pulpy touch of a John Carpenter (or his acolyte David Twohy) and instead gets the strained self-seriousness of director Tarsem Singh. July 10 release from Universal/Focus’ relaunched genre label Gramercy Pictures will have its work cut out for it against the big guns of summer.

Written by Spanish brothers Alex and David Pastor (whose little-seen 2009 “Carriers” was one of the better zombie/virus thrillers of recent vintage), “Self/less” cribs »

- Scott Foundas

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'Self/less': Film Review

4 July 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

In 1966, John Frankenheimer directed one of his most audacious movies, Seconds, with a script by Lewis John Carlino from a novel by David Ely. It told the story of an older banker who solicits the help of a shadowy organization that will fake his death and reconstruct him with a brand new identity, as well as a new face and body. The movie was a box-office flop, but has developed a cult following over the years and clearly had an influence on the makers of Self/less, director Tarsem Singh and screenwriters Alex Pastor and David Pastor. The new

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»

- Stephen Farber

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Cinema's Hidden Pearls -- Part II

29 June 2015 12:41 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Cinema’s Hidden Pearls – Part II

By Alex Simon

One of nature’s rarest items, a pearl is produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk. Just like the shell of a clam, a pearl is composed of calcium carbonate in minute crystalline form, which has been deposited in concentric layers. Truly flawless pearls are infrequently produced in nature, and as a result, the pearl has become a metaphor for something rare, fine, admirable and valuable.

Hidden pearls exist in the world of movies, as well: films that, in spite of being brilliantly crafted and executed, never got the audience they deserved beyond a cult following.

Here are a few more of our favorite hidden pearls in the world of film:

1. Massacre at Central High (1976)

Dutch director, and former cameraman for the legendary Russ Meyer, Rene Daalder was hired by producers to direct an exploitation »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Cinema's Hidden Pearls -- Part I

27 June 2015 9:28 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Cinema’s Hidden Pearls – Part I

By Alex Simon

One of nature’s rarest items, a pearl is produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk. Just like the shell of a clam, a pearl is composed of calcium carbonate in minute crystalline form, which has been deposited in concentric layers. Truly flawless pearls are infrequently produced in nature, and as a result, the pearl has become a metaphor for something rare, fine, admirable and valuable. Hidden pearls exist in the world of movies, as well: films that, in spite of being brilliantly crafted and executed, never got the audience they deserved beyond a cult following.

Here are a few of our favorite hidden pearls in the world of film:

1. Night Moves (1975)

Director Arthur Penn hit three home runs in a row with the trifecta of Bonnie & Clyde, Alice’s Restaurant and Little Big Man, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

19 June 2015 4:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The »

- Andre Soares

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Round-Up: Z For Zachariah Trailer, The Walking Dead #1 Variant, Lost Soul

4 June 2015 2:14 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

A tense trailer for a post-apocalyptic thriller, variant cover art for The Walking Dead #1 featuring Michonne and her pets, and Blu-ray / DVD release details for Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau comprise this round-up.

Z for Zachariah: Directed by Craig Zobel from Nissar Modi's screenplay that's based on the 1974 novel by Robert C. O’Brien, Z for Zachariah stars Margot Robbie, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Chris Pine. The film is slated for a limited theatrical release from Roadside Attractions beginning August 21st.

Synopsis (via Collider): "In the wake of a nuclear war, a young woman survives on her own, fearing she may actually be the proverbial last woman on earth, until she discovers the most astonishing sight of her life: another human being. A distraught scientist, he’s nearly been driven mad by radiation exposure and his desperate search for others. »

- Derek Anderson

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Jay’s Top Ten Conspiracy Films

4 June 2015 1:24 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

By: Jay Dyer

Some of these will be obvious, but are there insights in certain lesser-known films that shed light on real-world conspiracies?  My list will exclude all things alien, since I’m of the opinion the alien agenda is largely a bunch of bunk.  In selecting my favorites, I’ve tried to balance quality with subject matter, as some films may have a great concept with poor execution.  If you missed any of these or if they’re long-forgotten films you halfway watched with that sexy date 15 years ago, I recommend giving them a new look.

10.Conspiracy Theory. 1997.  Director Richard Donner has Mel Gibson as the tinfoil hat nutball seeking to uncover the truth about his own past.  Ultimately the film details the actual Mkultra program, with Captain Picard as the handler.

9. V for Vendetta. 2005. A Wachowski brothers work, V initiates Eve into the realities of the establishment’s corruption. »

- Jay Dyer

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Jumping for joy by Anne-Katrin Titze

27 May 2015 6:48 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Jean Boenish and Base jumping pioneer Carl Boenish in Marah Strauch's soaring Sunshine Superman

A conversation with Marah Strauch on Carl Boenish turned to John Frankenheimer's The Gypsy Moths, starring Deborah Kerr, Burt Lancaster and Gene Hackman, German mountain films by Arnold Fanck with Luis Trenker and Leni Riefenstahl, Werner Herzog's Fitzcarraldo and Les Blank's Burden Of Dreams with a touch of Caspar David Friedrich and a beam of Donovan's Sunshine Superman.

The Sunshine Superman here is Carl Boenish, the founder of Base jumping. Breathtaking aerial footage shot by Boenish and his colleagues accompanies a glimpse into the development of the extreme sport, always close to the edge, head in the clouds. It is a film filled with light and air with a refreshing lack of cynicism. Director Strauch in interviews with Boenish's wife Jean explores how the private man, the scholar of Christian Science and the »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

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