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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 51 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

200 Greatest Horror Films (30-21)

30 October 2015 1:27 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Special Mention: Werckmeister Harmonies

Directed by Bela Tarr and Ágnes Hranitzky

Written by László Krasznahorkai and Bela Tarr

2000, Hungary / Italy / Germany

Genre: Emotional Horror

Bela Tarr is a filmmaker whose work is a highly acquired taste, but as a metaphysical horror story, Werckmeister Harmonies is an utter masterpiece that should appeal to most cinephiles. The film title refers to the 17th-century German organist-composer Andreas Werckmeister, esteemed for his influential structure and harmony of music. Harmonies is strung together like a magnificent symphony working on the viewer’s emotions over long stretches of time even when the viewer is unaware of what’s going on. Attempting to make sense of Tarr’s movies in strict narrative terms is not the best way to go about watching his films; but regardless if you come away understanding Harmonies or not, you won’t soon forget the film. Harmonies is a technical triumph, shot »

- Ricky Fernandes

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120 Essential Horror Scenes Part 7: Meltdowns

24 October 2015 9:55 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

If the transformation is a character’s external change then the meltdown is the internal equivalent. Sometimes the most terrifying part of a horror film isn’t when the monster pops out, but when a character loses his or her grip on reality. The psychosis can begin gradually, exacerbated by stress, sickness, or an outside tormentor. Often the character begins a film in complete control of his or her mental faculties. But control is a relative term, and in a horror film, the illusion of control can be just as powerful as actual agency. The options: denial or embracement. The psychological break will come soon enough. The only question is, how broken will the person be once it does?


Alien (1979) – Ash malfunctions 

The crew of the cargo ship Nostromo has just about had it. Awakened from a cozy hypersleep to answer the worst wrong number in interstellar history, they then »

- Staff

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Paramount to shoot Battle for Alcatraz movie about 1946 escape attempt

20 October 2015 5:21 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

New film will continue studios’ love affair with the infamous island jail, previously the subject of ventures by directors John Frankenheimer, Don Siegel – and Michael Bay

Hollywood is to return to the rocky, unforgiving terrain of America’s most infamous penitentiary for a prison-escape thriller based on a true story, Battle for Alcatraz, according to Us reports.

Paramount has won a bidding war against five other studios to shoot a new story about the infamous island jail, already the subject of classic 1979 Clint Eastwood movie Escape from Alcatraz among others.

Continue reading »

- Ben Child

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120 Essential Horror Scenes Part 5: Dreams & Hallucinations

14 October 2015 2:14 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Dreams and hallucinations can be the broadest of horror staples. Throw in some weird imagery, maybe a few jarring cuts, and you have an instant scare. But an effective dream sequence is more than technique, it’s a filmmaker capturing a specific type of fear: losing control, having your life shattered, or meeting a manifestation of your guilt. The dream or the hallucination is the character’s psyche putting the pieces together or falling apart completely. Of course, dreams don’t always require messages. Sometimes, they’re just damn scary.


Aliens (1986)- Ripley’s nightmare

Aliens is the perfect sequel for many reasons. It follows in the footsteps of the original 1979 classic while existing as its own entity and delivering new characters that are just as memorable as the first’s. What’s more, it favors high-tension action scenes over more traditional horror-centric scenes, demonstrating the malleability of the series. »

- Staff

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Best Old School Horror/Mystery Television Series

8 October 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | Boomtron | See recent Boomtron news »

Halloween is almost here and it is time to snuggle in with your cats/significant other/or whatever else makes you feel snuggly and warm and get to binge watching some weird or scary shows. The weather is getting cooler and the atmosphere is getting spookier so check out these four television shows for the weird, scary, and downright odd.

Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks has everything. Murder, serial killers, possession by the other worldly, love triangles, amnesia, a lady who hears a log talk to her, drugs, and sex. But the best part of the series is Agent Dale Cooper played by  Kyle MacLachlan and Sherilyn Fenn as Audrey Horne. Both are gorgeous and Agent Cooper is marvelously eccentric while falling in love with the life that is Twin Peaks.

While this show isn’t really scary, it is the definition of weird. The supernatural aspects of the show kept »

- Sarah Sommer

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The Connection | Blu-ray Review

22 September 2015 3:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Cedric Jimenez‘s The Connection is a handling of a scenario touched upon from an American perspective in William Friedkin’s classic 1971 film The French Connection. A nicely mounted production peppered with several visually arresting moments and fine attention to period detail doesn’t have the same powerful draw as the earlier title. Unfortunately, Jimenez’s film often feels a bit too derivative by today’s standards of true crime epics. A great cast, headlined by Jean Dujardin and Gille Lelouche are reason enough to give the title a look, while it’s mid-July theatrical release (following mostly positive reviews out of the premiere at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival) yielded mild box office.

The Connection (aka La French) may not appear to be anything special. And the truth of the matter is, it really isn’t, except for the fact that it’s loosely related to the long spanning »

- Nicholas Bell

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The Satan Bug

22 September 2015 10:02 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Techno-thriller fans have been waiting a long time for a good disc of action ace John Sturges' sci-fi espionage suspenser. George Maharis, Richard Basehart, Anne Francis and Dana Andrews must stop a madman who has snatched a full battery of deadly bio-warfare viruses from a super-secret government lab. Each flask can wipe out an entire city, and one of them will kill every living thing on the planet. The Satan Bug Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 114 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring George Maharis, Richard Basehart, Anne Francis, Dana Andrews, John Larkin, Richard Bull, Frank Sutton, Edward Asner, Simon Oakland, John Anderson, James Hong, Hari Rhodes, Henry Beckman, Harry Lauter, Tol Avery, Russ Bender, James Doohan, Harold Gould, Carey Loftin. Cinematography Robert Surtees Film Editor Ferris Webster Original Music Jerry Goldsmith Written by Edward Anhalt, James Clavell from the novel by Ian Stuart (Alistair MacLean »

- Glenn Erickson

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3rd Annual Jalopnik Film Festival Road Trip to L.A. With 'Mad Max,' 'Steve McQueen'

17 September 2015 12:26 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Gawker Media's Jalopnik Film Festival is Accepting Submissions (and Volvo Wants to Help You Make a Car Film)  The Jalopnik Film Festival, now in its third year, is motoring west to Los Angeles for the weekend of September 25-26.  The festival, devoted to all-things automobile, will feature a full day of documentary and narrative films at the Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Titles slated for screening include Bent-Jorgen Perlmutt's "Havana Motor Club," Adam Carolla's "Winning: The Racing Life of Paul Newman" and "Steve McQueen: The Man and Le Mans." John Frankenheimer's "Ronin" and George Miller's original "Mad Max" will also be getting the big screen treatment.  The festival will include a reader-submitted short film competition, judged by Carolla, L.A. Angels pitcher C.J. Wilson, filmmaker Jeff Zwart and TV personality Spike Feresten.  Read More: Here Are All the Movies Opening Today, May 22; »

- Aubrey Page

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Amid Festival Reindeer Games, Telluride Keeps On Keeping On

3 September 2015 8:01 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Robert Redford often admits that the Sundance Film Festival has been “a victim of its own success,” referring to press inundation at the event over the years. For Telluride, it was the festival’s steady rise as a launching pad for awards season power players that attracted increasing media numbers (ahem). But that kind of attention is admittedly antithetical to the goals of the annual cinephile retreat.

So I put the question to Telluride executive director Julie Huntsinger bluntly when we spoke earlier this week about the 2015 lineup. Would she and co-founder Tom Luddy have preferred folks like me stay away?

“No,” she exclaims. “I think the discussions that sometimes happen about the awards derby, I kind of wish those weren’t going on. But they’re happening anyway and who are we to say one thing or another about it? This little secret on the mountain has been doing »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Bruce Dern To Appear At "Wild River" 50th Anniversary Screening, L.A., September 17

30 August 2015 10:51 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

Elia Kazan’s 1960 film Wild River, which stars Montgomery Clift, Lee Remick, Joan Van Fleet, and is Bruce Dern’s debut film, celebrates its 55th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 110-minute film on Thursday, September 17th, 2015 at 7:30 pm. Actor Bruce Dern is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Wild River (1960), set in Depression-era America, tells a provocative story of the conflict between an agent from the Tennessee Valley Authority and a proud, defiant older woman who refuses to sell her land in order to make way for a much needed dam. Oscar-nominated actors Montgomery Clift and Lee Remick star, and Oscar-winning actress Jo Van Fleet (only 40 at the time she made the film) plays the stubborn, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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19 actors who threw their own movies under the bus: "The film was terrible. But the house it built is terrific"

21 August 2015 4:01 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Some films are bad. In fact some films are so bad, even the actors promoting them can't deny just how bad they are, as these cinematic turncoats prove...

1. George Clooney: "I think we might have killed the franchise."

Film: Batman & Robin (1997)

Box office: $238.2 million

Rotten Tomatoes rating: 11%

"My phone rang, and the head of Warner Bros said, 'Come into my office, you are going to play Batman in a Batman film' and I said, 'Yeah!' I called my friends and they screamed and I screamed and we couldn't believe it!

"I just thought the last one had been successful so I thought I was just going to be in a big successful franchise movie. I think we might have killed the franchise."

2. Arnold Schwarzenegger: "It's the worst film I have ever made."

Film: Red Sonja (1985)

Box office: $6.9 million

Rotten Tomatoes rating: 15%

"It's the worst film I have ever made. »

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Lance Henriksen: The Hollywood Interview

10 August 2015 5:30 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Lance Henriksen: A Survivor’s Tale

A seminal event happened to actor Lance Henriksen in his late teens that serves as the perfect metaphor for his life: Henriksen was working at a rural New Mexico gas station, and was taken in by the couple who owned it. They had a teenage daughter a couple years his junior. One day, figuring Lance and his daughter were getting a bit too chummy; the man drove Henriksen out to the middle of the desert. “All winter long, the frost has been pushing up these beautiful amethyst stones,” the man explained. “I’ll drop you off and you can collect them, then come back and sell them for a lot of money.” Henriksen stayed half the night, and then started to succumb to the desert’s freezing temperatures. “I dug a hole and buried myself up to my chest, with a fire in front of me. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Prime Cut | Blu-ray Review

28 July 2015 6:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Lovers of odd and neglected vintage cinema can rejoice in the repackaging of Michael Ritchie’s weird sophomore title, Prime Cut. With all the menace of a Dick Francis novel and a perverse comedic streak akin to the tastes of John Waters, this misbegotten feature hasn’t received the notable following it deserves for one glaring reason—it’s increasingly warped treatment of women, which may have seemed enlightened for the period, but eventually only adds to the problematic misogyny that never abates. As far as its handling of more sensational, exploitational elements, Ritchie and screenwriter Robert Dillon manage to smooth its edges with breakneck pacing, sarcastic repartee, and a handful of impressively orchestrated face-offs.

The head of the Irish mob in Chicago hires Nick Devlin (Lee Marvin), an enforcer, to travel to Kansas City and collect money he’s owed by Mary Ann (Gene Hackman), the man who runs »

- Nicholas Bell

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Self/less review – Tarsem Singh’s dopey sci-fi romp

19 July 2015 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This identity-swap sci-fi drama fails on every level, in spite of Ben Kingsley and Ryan Reynolds in the central roles

Ben Kingsley gets joint top billing but takes an early bath in this tiresome tale of an ageing executive who pays to have his dying soul transplanted into the body of a younger man. Enter Ryan Reynolds as the empty vessel into which Sir Ben’s spirit is magnetically injected – only to discover that this new body has a mind and memory of its own. Or, as Derek Luke puts it: “You thought you were buying a new car, turns out it has a few miles on the clock.” Recycling riffs from John Frankenheimer’s superior 1966 thriller Seconds (which in turn inspired Face/Off), Tarsem Singh’s dopey romp signally fails to mine the identity-swap promise of its premise. David and Alex Pastor’s script may be lumpen, but Reynolds »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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July 14th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include It Follows, Ex MacHina, Howling II

13 July 2015 9:39 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

July 14th may not have a lot of genre-related titles arriving on DVD and Blu-ray, but the films making their home entertainment debuts this week are a rather stellar bunch nonetheless. For anyone who may have missed two of the best indie films this year in theaters—Ex Machina and It Follows—you’ll have a chance to catch up with both this coming Tuesday.

Scream Factory is also keeping busy this week with their high-def release of Philippe Mora’s cult classic, Howling II: Your Sister is a Werewolf, and they also have two double feature Blu-rays coming out as well. Severin Films has put together an extensive special edition release of the recent documentary Lost Soul, which follows the troubled production of Richard Stanley’s Island of Doctor Moreau and looks pretty incredible and for all you X-Men fans out there, the Rogue Cut version of Days »

- Heather Wixson

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Self/Less – The Review

9 July 2015 7:25 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Body/mind transference, the central idea behind the thriller Self/Less, is so flush with opportunity that it’s frustrating to see this new movie fly off the rails so early and so completely. Self/Less has the premise for thought-provoking science-fiction, but it doesn’t have the gumption. It would rather be a blockbuster than a mind-bender but it turns out to be neither. Ben Kingsley stars as Damian Hale, a miserly real-estate magnate at death’s door who pays a quarter million dollars for the services of the shadowy corporation known as ‘Phoenix Biogenics’ (we know he’s rich because he’s shown in his Trump-style penthouse complete with solid gold doors and bannister). Albright (Matthew Goode), Phoenix’s spiffy young chief, offers his clients ‘Shedding’, a process of transferring the mind from the old and sick body into a healthy younger human grown organically in their lab. »

- Tom Stockman

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‘Self/less’ Reviews: Ryan Reynolds, Ben Kingsley Saddled With ‘Boneheaded’ Plot

8 July 2015 12:42 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Despite charismatic leads Ryan Reynolds and Ben Kingsley, science-fiction thriller “Self/less” hasn’t charmed critics. Focus Features’ newest flick has a 30 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with some reviewers denouncing its underdeveloped script and others pardoning Reynolds for his inability to execute a solid performance. Alonso Duralde wrote in his review for TheWrap: “Ben Kingsley plays a New York real estate mogul who pays big bucks to have his consciousness microwaved into Ryan Reynolds‘ body in ‘Self/less,’ but the real reheating of leftovers has already occurred: this new science-fiction thriller borrows the foundation of a much better film »

- Kathy Zerbib

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John Frankenheimer: A Remembrance

6 July 2015 12:37 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Director John Frankenheimer.

I'm often asked which, out of the over 600 interviews I've logged with Hollywood's finest, is my favorite. It's not a tough answer: John Frankenheimer.

We instantly clicked the day we met at his home in Benedict Canyon, and spent most of the afternoon talking in his den. A friendship of sorts developed over the years, with visits to his office for screenings of the old Kinescopes he directed for shows like "Playhouse 90" during his salad days in live television during the 1950s.

We hadn't spoken for nearly a year in mid-2002 when the phone rang. It was John, who spoke in what can only be described as a "stentorian bark," like a general. "Alex!" he exclaimed. "John Frankenheimer." He could sense something was amiss with me. It was. My screenwriting career had stalled. My marriage was progressing to divorce. I had hit bottom. John knew that »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Robert Evans: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

5 July 2015 1:02 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Producer Robert Evans, circa 1970s, in the documentary The Kid Stays in the Picture.

Robert Evans: The Kid Is Alright


Alex Simon

I interviewed legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans in 2002 for Venice Magazine, in conjunction with the release of the documentary "The Kid Stays in the Picture," adapted from his iconic autobiography and audiobook. Our chat took place at Woodland, Evans' storied estate in Beverly Hills, in his equally famous screening room, which mysteriously burned down a couple years later. Evans was still physically frail, having recently survived a series of strokes, but his mind, his wit and his charm were sharp as ever, with near total recall for people, places and stories. Many, many stories. Here are a few of them.

It’s a widely-held belief that the years 1967-76 represent the “golden age” of American cinema. Just look at a few of these titles: Rosemary’s Baby, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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‘Self/less’ Review: Ryan Reynolds Shares Ben Kingsley’s Brain in Point/less Thriller

4 July 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Ben Kingsley plays a New York real estate mogul who pays big bucks to have his consciousness microwaved into Ryan Reynolds‘ body in “Self/less,” but the real reheating of leftovers has already occurred: this new science-fiction thriller borrows the foundation of a much better film — John Frankenheimer’s 1966 “Seconds” — and strips it of any larger meaning. Director Tarsem Singh, previously known for such art-direction extravaganzas as “The Fall” and “Immortals,” seems determined to prove that he can handle more mundane material that doesn’t call for as much visual flair. The film he has crafted from the script by. »

- Alonso Duralde

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 51 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

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