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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997 | 1992

18 items from 2016


Who Should Receive Honorary Oscars Next?

19 July 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

We're about one month away from the announcement of this year's Honorary Oscar recipients. They're usuallly announced at the end of August for a November Governor's Awards ceremony. This year's ceremony will be on November 12th. Last year rumors circled that it was Doris Day's turn but that didn't turn out to be accurate. For the past two years, The Film Experience has tried to make up for the dearth of movie site reporting about the Oscar Honorary careers (beyond the sharing of press releases / YouTube videos of their speeches) with mini-retrospectives so we're always hoping they'll choose well to give us wonderful careers to discuss right here. 

Let's reprint a list of worthies we shared a year or so ago, with a few adjustments, in case any of the elites in the Academy are undecided about who to put forth or get behind for these coveted honors.

 

James Ivory »

- NATHANIEL R

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Water Rackets: “Erin Brockovich”

19 July 2016 7:05 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Steven Soderbergh's Erin Brokovich (2000) is playing July 17 - August 16, 2016 on Mubi in the United Kingdom. “Erin Brockovich is perhaps the most forceful articulation of Soderbergh’s proclivity toward emphasizing character over other filmic concerns. Without sacrificing their causal role within the narrative, who characters are is often of greater interest than what they do—indeed, what they will do and accomplish is often a foregone conclusion… while Erin Brockovich may, thematically, be a film about responsibility, formally, Erin Brockovich is a movie about Erin Brockovich—and decidedly so.”— Andrew Patrick Nelson, in The Philosophy of Steven Soderbergh“I’m smart, I’m hardworking and I’m not leaving here without a job.”— Erin, Erin BrockovichErin Brockovich must win people over. As a single mother of three who wears short skirts and low-cut tops, she’s at the more preyed-upon end of a predatory spectrum—one whose social logic is built on first impressions. »

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Dressing ‘The Dresser’ with a World War II Vibe (Emmys Watch)

13 July 2016 1:39 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Dresser” was not only intensely personal for Anthony Hopkins in returning to his bittersweet theatrical roots, but also for costume designer Fotini Dimou (“Ripley’s Game”) — the real dresser, so to speak.

The World War II-set backstage drama about the symbiotic relationship between an aging English actor, Sir (Hopkins), and his personal assistant, Norman (Ian McKellen), brilliantly explores the tension between approval and rejection.

“Dressers were like personal assistants and looked after the stars in every way,” explained Dimou. “And what I researched is how these companies used to work. They didn’t have designers as such but what they had was a wardrobe mistress or master or the chief dresser, the role that Norman plays, who provides the costumes for the actor/manager, who ran the company.”

The Dresser,” by Ronald Harwood (who had personal experience as a dresser), first opened in London’s West End in 1980 and »

- Bill Desowitz

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A celebration of disembodied brains and heads in the movies

13 July 2016 8:12 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2016

We take a look at some of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Brain From The Planet Arous and Prometheus.

For some reason we've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. Note that we’re not talking about decapitations here - though goodness knows that cinema is home to plenty of those, from Japanese samurai epics to modern slasher horrors.

No, we’re talking about movies where heads and brains remain sentient even when they’re stuffed into jars or colossal things made of stone. Sometimes used for comedic effect, at other times for shock value, they’re a surprisingly common phenomenon in the movies. Here, we celebrate a few of our absolute favourites - though you’re sure »

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Who should join Angelina Jolie in the Murder Cast?

13 June 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Murtada here. Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express is being remade by Kenneth Branagh. He will direct and play the lead part of Belgian detective Hercule Poirot who’s investigating a murder that happens on the famous train as it is making its way across Europe. The novel has been adapted several times, most famously into an Oscar winning film in 1974 by Sidney Lumet and an all star cast, led by Albert Finney as Poirot. Angelina Jolie was announced as Mrs Hubbard, an American loquacious socialite, played in 1974 version by Lauren Bacall. It’s good casting as the part calls a star with lots of presence.

Even though I haven’t read the Christie novel, I have seen the movie version and a 2010 British TV version with Jessica Chastain right before she hit it big. The story lends itself to an all star cast as basically every character gets an intro, one big scene and gets to participate in the finale. And everyone has a secret of course so the parts are juicy and fun and not too taxing on the actors. Hopefully lots of entertaining actors will sign up.

Who would you cast? Our suggestions for some of the characters after the jump »

- Murtada Elfadl

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Angelina Jolie could be boarding Murder on the Orient Express

10 June 2016 1:40 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Variety is reporting that Angelina Jolie (By The Sea) is in talks to join the cast of Murder on the Orient Express, a remake of the 1974 classic based on Agatha Christie’s novel.

Thor and Cinderella director Kenneth Branagh is helming the film as well as starring in the lead role of Hercule Poirot. Simon Kinberg (X-Men: Apocalypse), Ridley Scott (The Martian) and Mark Gordon (Steve Jobs) are producing alongside Branagh, with the script penned by Michael Green who has co-written upcoming sequel Blade Runner 2.

Christie’s classic novel was first published in 1934 and the story “revolves around a murder onboard the famous train. The film follows Belgian detective Poirot who’s tasked with solving the case — in which a number of passengers could potentially be the murderer.” If she signs on, Jolie will play Mrs. Hubbard, portrayed in the original film by Lauren Bacall.

The 1974 version, directed by Sidney Lumet, »

- Scott J. Davis

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Angelina Jolie Could Board Kenneth Branagh’s ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ Remake

10 June 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Fox’s Murder on the Orient Express remake has a long way to go if it hopes to catch up to the star power of Sidney Lumet’s 1974 version, which featured Albert Finney, Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Jacqueline Bisset, Sean Connery, Anthony Perkins, and Vanessa Redgrave. But getting Angelina Jolie on board is probably a good place to start. The […]

The post Angelina Jolie Could Board Kenneth Branagh’s ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ Remake appeared first on /Film. »

- Angie Han

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Angelina Jolie in Talks to Star in 'Murder On The Orient Express' Remake

10 June 2016 10:10 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

According to Variety, Angelina Jolie is in talks to star in a remake of the 1974 hit Murder On The Orient Express, which Kenneth Branagh is helming for 20th Century Fox. Branagh is also  producing alongside Ridley Scott, Simon Kinberg and Mark GordonMichael Green (Blade Runner 2) is writing the screenplay.

Jolie would play Mrs. Harriet Hubbard, a role that Lauren Bacall had in the original film. Sidney Lumet’s 1974 movie starred Albert Finney, Ingrid Bergman, Jacqueline Bisset, Colin Blakely, Sean Connery, John Gielgud, Anthony Perkins, Vanessa Redgrave and Michael York. It was also nominated for six Academy Awards.

Agatha Christie’s classic mystery novel Murder On The Orient Express centers on special Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, who boards a train from Jerusalem to Europe only to have a murder committed in the car next to his during a snowstorm. Poirot tries to discover the murderer or murderers before there's another victim. »

- Kellvin Chavez

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Angelina Jolie Circles ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ Remake

10 June 2016 1:20 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Angelina Jolie is in early talks to board Fox’s remake of “Murder on the Orient Express.”

Fellow actor/director Kenneth Branagh is helming the film, in addition to starring as Hercule Poirot. The producers are Branagh, Ridley Scott, Simon Kinberg and Mark Gordon. Michael Schaefer and Aditya Sood will also produce in some capacity.

Michael Green (“Blade Runner 2”) is writing the screenplay based on Agatha Christie’s novel, with Steve Asbell overseeing the production for Fox.

Christie’s book, published in 1934, revolves around a murder onboard the famous train. The film follows Belgian detective Poirot who’s tasked with solving the case — in which a number of passengers could potentially be the murderer.

Variety reported in 2013 that Fox was developing the project as a remake of Sidney Lumet’s 1974 movie, which starred Albert Finney as the genius detective investigating the murder of an American tycoon aboard the train. The »

- Dave McNary

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Dp Peter Suschitzky on The Empire Strikes Back, Collaborating with David Cronenberg and the New Wave’s “Boring Light”

9 June 2016 1:57 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

British cinematographer Peter Suschitzky is known for his collaborations with David Cronenberg (Cosmopolis, A Dangerous Method, Eastern Promises, A History of Violence, Spider, eXistenZ, Crash, Naked Lunch and Dead Ringers). His eclectic career saw him start working in fantastical “what if” tales on It Happened Here (1966) and Privilege (1967). He worked with Peter Watkins, Albert Finney, Peter Watkins, John Boorman, Ken Russell and Warris Hussein in Britain, before Hollywood came calling. is first trip to Cannes, working on Charlie Bubbles by Albert Finney, was cancelled after the festival was stopped by the May ’68 protests led by Jean Luc-Godard. This year, I met him at the […] »

- Kaleem Aftab

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The Smackdowns Are Coming!

8 June 2016 10:49 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

You thought we'd forgotten the Smackdowns. We have not! Here's what's coming this season. You know you want to join in the movie merriment! We're giving you a headstart so you can get to watching these 13 movies for the first time (or revisiting them) over your summer vacations. More details to follow as we get closer to the actual Smackdowns. 

Sunday July 31st

The Best Supporting Actresses of 1977

The Oscar went to the legendary but controversial Vanessa Redgrave for Julia and while she might be impossible to beat, the movies are all juicy in this category. Tuesday Weld co-stars in the provocative Looking for Mr Goodbar, Melinda Dillon was part of the fine cast of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Quinn Cumming charmed voters in The Goodbye Girl, and Leslie Browne, a dancer, debuted in Oscar's all time biggest loser The Turning Point (nominated for 11 Oscars but it lost every category! »

- NATHANIEL R

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Peter Shaffer Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Amadeus’ Writer Was 90

6 June 2016 10:58 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Sir Peter Shaffer, the English playwright and screenwriter who scored an Oscar for Amadeus and a nomination for Equus, died today in a hospice in County Cork, Ireland. He was 90. Shaffer wrote at least 18 plays including Amadeus, Equus and The Royal Hunt of the Sun, the last of which was the first show produced by the UK’s National Theatre company in 1964. The first cast of his next work, 1965’s Black Comedy, featured Maggie Smith, Derek Jacobi and Albert Finney. Amadeus… »

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Review: 'The Dresser' Pays Loving Homage to the Theatre Without Forgetting It's a Film

30 May 2016 3:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

There are movies that exist only to highlight the towering work of their performers, and then there are films like "The Dresser." A play by Ronald Harwood first staged in 1980 and re-envisioned for the silver screen in 1983 with Albert Finney and Tom Courtenay, the feature-length appreciation of the theatre — with an eye toward the actors willingly indentured to it — functions almost surprisingly well as a meta-narrative on aging, acting and the differing perspectives on the importance of both. With Anthony Hopkins and Ian McKellen digging into the meaty roles in front of them, there's plenty of juice for the audience to savor, even if each viewer digests "The Dresser" differently. Considering its history, both on stage and now with two filmed versions, "The Dresser" could have easily gone the other way. Harwood's play has always walked a fine line between doing service to the script (and thus the art form it honors) and satirizing it, »

- Ben Travers

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Review: 'The Dresser' Pays Loving Homage to the Theatre Without Forgetting It's a Film

30 May 2016 3:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There are movies that exist only to highlight the towering work of their performers, and then there are films like "The Dresser." A play by Ronald Harwood first staged in 1980 and re-envisioned for the silver screen in 1983 with Albert Finney and Tom Courtenay, the feature-length appreciation of the theatre — with an eye toward the actors willingly indentured to it — functions almost surprisingly well as a meta-narrative on aging, acting and the differing perspectives on the importance of both. With Anthony Hopkins and Ian McKellen digging into the meaty roles in front of them, there's plenty of juice for the audience to savor, even if each viewer digests "The Dresser" differently. Considering its history, both on stage and now with two filmed versions, "The Dresser" could have easily gone the other way. Harwood's play has always walked a fine line between doing service to the script (and thus the art form it honors) and satirizing it, »

- Ben Travers

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Great Double Features I’Ve Seen #1: Smokey And The Bandit (1977) And Convoy (1978)

12 March 2016 11:50 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

(This is the first in an occasional series in which I remember some of the best double features I’ve been lucky enough to see projected in a theater.)

The New Beverly Cinema, the oldest surviving revival theater in Los Angeles, has this week dished up a time-capsule glimpse into America’s popular obsession with Cb, or citizen’s band, radio and the largely mythological outlaw trucker culture through which it crackled. If you’re of a certain age (mine), and you ever cruised around town or down the highway jabbering to friends and strangers on an open channel frequency (I did—my handle was The Godfather!), given the opportunity I don’t see how you could possibly resist the chance to see the ultimate trucker-cb action-comedy pairing, Hal Needham’s Smokey and the Bandit and Sam Peckinpah’s Convoy. (I couldn’t!) As of this writing, the morning of »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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'Fargo': 10 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Coen Brothers' Classic

7 March 2016 6:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Has it really been 20 years since the release of "Fargo?" Yah, you betcha.

The snowbound crime comedy-drama, released March 8, 1996, marked the first mainstream smash for Joel and Ethan Coen. It also gave Frances McDormand and William H. Macy their signature roles, spawned the acclaimed FX drama series, and sparked a brief fad that had everyone talking with exaggerated Minne-soh-ta accents.

Still, two decades after the film's debut, there's still a lot of confusion about what in "Fargo" was truth, what was fiction, and what was an elaborate in-joke. Here, then, are the far-fetched facts behind the film.1. The opening title card claims the movie is based on a true story, but in fact, it's almost completely fictional. There was, however, a real-life crime with some superficial similarities. The victim was Helle Crafts, a Connecticut woman who disappeared in 1986. Her husband was ultimately convicted of her murder; investigators determined that he'd »

- Gary Susman

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Finney and Hepburn are Two For The Road January 30th at The Hi-Pointe

22 January 2016 7:18 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Two For The Road screens at 10:30am Saturday morning, January 30th at The Hi-Pointe Theater (1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117). Admission is $10 and this is a fundraiser sponsored by the St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society Alliance.

Albert Finney and Audrey Hepburn star in director Stanley Donen’s Two For The Road, which uses multiple parallel flashbacks to chronicle a couples’ 12-year marriage. The marriage in the present is falling apart as their love for one another dissolves. As they drive through the back roads of France they relive two other times in their lives when the same trip was made under much better circumstances. The cinematic trick of jumping from one road trip to the other is expertly handled. Hepburn and Finney are both terrific in the film. And the movie, released in 1967, captures the mood of the 60s before Nam, the Counterculture, and radical politics so altered the landscape. »

- Tom Stockman

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Brian Bedford, Master Stage Actor and Voice of Robin Hood, Dead at 80

13 January 2016 11:47 PM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Brian Bedford, the British stage veteran whose masterly performances and interpretations of classical roles captivated Canadian and American audiences for decades, died Wednesday in Santa Barbara. The 80-year-old had battled cancer for two-and-a-half years, according to a Stratford rep, who also told the Canadian Press that doctors had been "astounded by his will to live." Born in Yorkshire, Bedford shared Royal Academy classrooms with the likes of Peter O'Toole and Albert Finney, before embarking on an acting career that would span nearly 60 years and take him to theaters overseas. In southwestern Ontario, Bedford acted and directed for 29 seasons at Canada's famous Stratford fest, where he would develop his proclivity for the classics and perform the works of Shakespeare, Chekhov, and Molière, among others. Stateside he took turns in 18 Broadway productions, winning a Best Actor Tony in 1971 for Molière's The School for Wives and nabbing nominations six »

- Sean Fitz-Gerald

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997 | 1992

18 items from 2016


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