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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

7 items from 2017


Jean Rouverol Butler, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100

25 March 2017 2:33 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Jean Rouverol Butler, an actress turned screenwriter who was blacklisted by Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s and fled to Mexico with her husband, died Friday at the age of 100, according to a funeral notice posted by her family. Rouverol Butler’s introduction to showbiz came at an early age. Her mother, playwright Aurania (Ellerbeck) Rouverol, was the creator of Andy Hardy and many films for MGM. At 17, the young Rouverol was discovered in true Hollywood style while in a high school production. Her first professional acting role was as W.C. Fields’ daughter in “It’s a Gift” (1934), and »

- Rosemary Rossi

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Jean Rouverol, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100

25 March 2017 11:46 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Jean Rouverol, who played W.C. Fields' daughter in It's a Gift and then became a screenwriter who was blacklisted in Hollywood and driven with her husband to self-exile in Mexico, has died. She was 100.

Rouverol died Friday at a nursing home in Wingdale, N.Y., Rick Lertzman, co-author of the 2015 book The Life and Times of Mickey Rooney, told The Hollywood Reporter.

In recent years, Rouverol had been living with actor Cliff Carpenter, who also had been blacklisted, in Pawling, N.Y. He died in 2014 at age 98.

»

- Mike Barnes

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Jean Rouverol, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100

25 March 2017 11:46 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Jean Rouverol, who played W.C. Fields' daughter in It's a Gift and then became a screenwriter who was blacklisted in Hollywood and driven with her husband to self-exile in Mexico, has died. She was 100.

Rouverol died Friday at the home of her caregiver in Wingdale, N.Y., Rick Lertzman, co-author of the 2015 book The Life and Times of Mickey Rooney, told The Hollywood Reporter.

In recent years, Rouverol had been living with actor Cliff Carpenter, who also had been blacklisted, in Pawling, N.Y. He died in 2014 at age 98.

»

- Mike Barnes

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Wilson – Review

23 March 2017 9:24 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

 

This week sees another comic book adaptation arrive at movie theatres, while the Lego Batman and Logan are still pulling audiences in at the multiplex. Ah, but this film is not another superhero slugfest (we’ll have three more of those from Marvel Studios, and two from Warner/DC by the year’s end). No this comes from the “upper classes” of illustrated narratives, those “serious and somber” graphic novels (kind of a “highfalutin'” moniker). Several prestige flicks have been based on such books, like The History Of Violence and The Road To Perdition (both earned Oscar noms). The “graphic artist” (hey, I’ll bet he’d prefer cartoonist) behind this new film is no stranger to cinema. Matter of fact, this is his third feature-length movie adaptation. The first was my personal favorite flick of 2001, the quirky Ghost World (no ectoplasmic apparitions, but a teenage Scarlett Johansson). Five years »

- Jim Batts

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Three Classic Films Screening at The Tivoli March 7th – 9th

2 March 2017 8:28 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

My Little Chickadee, White Heat, and Raging Bull constitute the three-film series sponsored by The Mildred Kemper Art Museum next week at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in the University City Loop). This ties into the museum’s current exhibit “Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?” These are Free screenings!

A kiss. A punch. A body braced for impact. The paintings of Rosalyn Drexler exude uncanny stillness, anticipation and, frequently, the dread of imminent violence. Moments of intimacy and conflict are frozen, sliced and readied for examination — excerpts from narratives whose conclusions can only be guessed. From Feb. 10 to April 17, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis will present “Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?”, the first full-career retrospective for the multi-talented artist. Surveying six decades of work, the exhibition features major paintings and collages alongside rarely seen early sculptures. »

- Tom Stockman

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Cats on Camera: How to Shoot Feral Felines and Make Them Into Stars, According to the Director of ‘Kedi’

10 February 2017 10:24 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Plenty of directors have gleefully disregarded W.C. Fields’ old movie adage – “never work with children or animals” – but documentary filmmaker Ceyda Torun all but tossed it out the window when it came time to make her feature debut. With “Kedi,” Torun is all about the animals, specifically an adorable series of Turkish street cats that happily make their homes on the streets of Istanbul. The result is a wonderfully unique and deeply charming look at feral felines and the many humans who love and care for them, all told from a distinctly cat’s eye view.

For the Turkish filmmaker, the indelible cats that roam the various neighborhoods that make up her hometown are more than just subjects, they are cherished friends, and the film finds its true heart when it illuminates the special bonds between the cats and the people who endeavor to make their lives better though food, »

- Kate Erbland

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A Dog’S Purpose – Review

26 January 2017 10:30 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Excuse the pun, but Hollywood has gone to the dogs. And it’s not the first time. Man’s (and the movies’) best friend has been the hero and heroine of many a flick since the old nickleodeon days. The first canine superstar was probably Rin-Tin-tin way back in the silent era. He was a German Shepherd who rescued human co-stars and even a soon to be major studio (the Warner Brothers might not have survived without his box office bucks). Then came Lassie in her many media incarnations, along with other dogs that provided comic relief from Nick and Nora’s terrier Asta to that Saint Bernard behemoth, Beethoven. With the advent of social media there’s been an avalanche of pet adoration, with funny home videos of dogs taking a big bite out of the bandwidth. This helped fuel last summer’s animated smash The Secret Life Of Pets (primarily dogs, »

- Jim Batts

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7 items from 2017


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