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Jeff Fahey Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Trade Mark (1) | Trivia (13) | Personal Quotes (9)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 29 November 1952Olean, New York, USA
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Jeff Fahey was born in Olean, New York, one of 13 children of Jane (Gallagher) and Francis Thomas Fahey, who worked in a clothing store. He is of Irish descent. His family moved to Buffalo when he was 10, where he attended Father Baker's High School. After graduation in 1972 he traveled around the world doing odd jobs. He was a crewman on a fishing boat, drove an ambulance in Germany, lived in a kibbutz in Israel and spent some time in India. He then returned to Buffalo and joined the Studio Arena Theatre. From there he went to New York City, where he studied with Myra Rastova, began doing off-Broadway theater and television soap operas. He started a production company and produced off-Broadway shows out of the Raft Theatre on Theatre Row. He first gained attention as a motion picture actor in Lawrence Kasdan's Silverado (1985), in which he played Brian Dennehy's deputy Tyree, a cold-blooded killer with a thirst for vengeance. He starred in the acclaimed live television play The Execution of Raymond Graham (1985) and the TNT mini-series "44 Days". He starred for over two years in the daytime serial One Life to Live (1968). He appeared in the Broadway revival of "Brigadoon," toured with "Oklahoma," performed in Paris in "West Side Story" and in London in "Orphans" with Albert Finney.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Penquin54@webtv.net

Trade Mark (1)

Piercing blue eyes

Trivia (13)

He is one of 13 children.
He is a partner in a construction company and a film grips group called "Black Sheep Grips".
He is the co-founder of the American Road Production Workshop Series at the Raft Theatre in New York, and participates in the Writers' & Directors' Workshops there.
He owns his own production company under the banner Tyree Productions, which he is partners in with his 5 brothers.
Was invited to take ballet and instantly caught the bug. Despite being at the advanced age of 25, he won a full scholarship to dance with the Joffrey Ballet in New York City.
Taught ballroom dancing.
Danced with the Joffrey ballet for three years.
Was once a vacuum cleaner salesman, encyclopedia salesman, and a trainer in a health club.
Spent time trekking through the Himalayas and Afghanistan in his younger years while traveling around the world.
He joined the cast of Lost (2004) in 2008 and is working with two former co-stars, Josh Holloway, with whom he worked in Cold Heart (2001), and Naveen Andrews, with whom he worked in Grindhouse (2007).
He left home at age 17 and subsequently hitchhiked to Alaska, backpacked through Europe and worked in an Israeli kibbutz, among many other adventures.
Often travels to Kabul, Afghanistan, where he has been supporting an orphanage for several years.
Has English and Irish ancestry.

Personal Quotes (9)

(Making so many movies at once on a regular basis): "I got used to it quickly, because it's an easier job than what I was doing. I was making four or five films a year, mostly independent films, around the world. Out of the 41 films I've done, maybe seven of them have been studio films, I had an easy gig. So I would go from film to film. And there would be a new crew, new actors, new directors, new producers, new locations, some much worse than others. I'm not complaining about the work; I'm just saying that having a nice trailer on the set, a nice hotel, and a studio and a network behind your show is a lot easier than wondering why your tent is leaking."
Eventually, I'll build a ranch and raise horses.
(On appearing on the new TV show "The Marshall"): "All my buddies over the years, like Kevin Costner and the guys -- I see 'em go here, I see 'em go there -- but I just do my work. And now this. People say it's going to change your life. I tell them that it's always changing anyway."
I have an affinity for good roles in good films. I like a variety of parts, and if some of the good stuff happens to be in fantasy and horror, I do them.
(On being directed by Anthony Perkins in Psycho 3) That was pretty wild to be shooting at Universal Studios. It was my second film and to be on the backlot at night with the fake rain and lightning and you look up and there's the Bates Motel house and all of a sudden Anthony is talking to you, man. There I am with a crew of one hundred and fifty people around, but you're in between this little space called action and cut talking to Norman Bates - I mean my God! You know what I mean? It's been a wild ride.
(2012, on Bad Blood: The Hatfields And McCoys) Well, I have to tell you, this was very interesting because, I didn't get the job, but it was on the table that I might possibly go off to Romania and go off to work on the Hatfields And McCoys with Kevin Costner. I'm not saying I had the job, but I was in the mix, as it were. But then I had an opportunity at the same time to do a play at the Geffen Theater here in Los Angeles, one called Next Fall, with Lesley Ann Warren, and I hadn't been on stage in 27 years. So I had two wonderful things in front of me, and I had to make a decision: I could take the play, which was a definite, and fulfill another chapter of my career-because I did want to get back to theater, since the last time had been in London, doing Orphans with Albert Finney, with Gary Sinise directing-or there was the possibility of doing Hatfields And McCoys. So I took the play.

While I was doing the play, obviously the bigger production of Hatfields And McCoys with Costner was happening, and these guys from a small production company got a hold of my manager and said they were doing this little low-budget film on the Hatfields and McCoys, and it was filming, like, three days after finishing the play. And I thought, "You know what? Here's a chance to jump into that world." Again, I want to stress that I didn't have the job, so it wasn't like I turned it down. I didn't have it. But I thought this was serendipitous that this would appear, so I took it and had a great experience. And let me tell you, the best part of it, I would say, was working with Perry King. After all these years of having not seen Perry... I mean, we'd met, our paths had crossed over the years, but working with Perry King and seeing him in that role and in that environment, I really realized-not that I didn't think so before, but I actually saw it-that that guy's a damned good actor. He's still got a whole other chapter of his career in front of him. So little things like that were great.
(2012, Woman of Desire) Well, I have to say, Bob [Mitchum] and I became very close over the years. He actually came in and played my father on an episode of The Marshal. And Bo Derek was a great gal to work with. I don't know if people realize-well, I'm sure they do-but back then I think everybody thought of her just as this beautiful woman from 10. But she's a really intelligent, giving, warm individual. And Steven Bauer, I just worked with Steven on an episode of Common Law a couple of months ago, but before that, I hadn't worked with him since we were in South Africa on Woman of Desire, so that's, what, almost 20 years? So we've reconnected from that. I'd have to say that the relationships were the best part of what came out of that film. And I always enjoyed working in different parts of Africa, and that was shot down in Cape Town.
(2012, on Body Parts) Well, the first thing I can tell you is that I think it was about eight hours in special effects for that whole opening sequence of putting the arm on. Yeah, that was quite an experience. I didn't realize that would turn into such a cult film. Again, you never know. I remember when we did that, the nights in Toronto were very cold. Also, just as it was about to come out, right before the opening, was when that whole Jeffrey Dahmer thing happened. I remember they were thinking about delaying the opening of the film, or at least I heard talks about toning down some of the ads. But it certainly became quite a cult film over the years.
(2012, on White Hunter, Black Heart) It was an amazing experience... and, sorry, but you're gonna hear that a lot connected to all my work, because I've always felt fortunate to even be able to make a living in this arena and go off on all these adventures. But that was wonderful to go to Africa. We shot that down in Zimbabwe, so to travel over to Africa on the Warner Bros. jet with Clint Eastwood, and then stop in Paris and meet with Peter Viertel to do the first part of my research. And then Peter came and visited us down in Zimbabwe. Of course, you probably know it was based on his book that he wrote about his experiences with John Huston, so to be sitting there on numerous occasions with Peter Viertel and hear his stories about his relationship with John Huston, it was fascinating. And, of course, obviously working with Clint and developing that relationship. Yeah, once again, gosh, you bring these up and realize... well, not that I've forgotten, but it brings to mind all of these great people I've been fortunate enough to meet and work with. But Africa? That was a great one.

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