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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

1-20 of 30 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Frank Ocean Shares His Favorite Films, Including Tarkovsky, PTA, Kurosawa, Lynch, Kubrick & More

23 August 2016 9:17 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After a few delays, Frank Ocean‘s Channel Orange follow-up, Blond, has now arrived and, with it, not only an additional visual album, but Boys Don’t Cry, a magazine that only a select few were able to get their hands on. (Although, if you believe the artist’s mom, we can expect a wider release soon.) In between a personal statement about his new work and a Kanye West poem about McDonalds, Ocean also listed his favorite films of all-time and we have the full list today.

Clocking at 207.23 hours, as Ocean notes, his list includes classics from Andrei TarkovskyDavid Lynch, Ingmar Bergman, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Orson Welles, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Jean Cocteau, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola, Fritz Lang, Werner Herzog, Akira Kurosawa, Ridley ScottBernardo BertolucciSergei Eisenstein, F. W. Murnau, Luis Buñuel, and more.

As for some more recent titles, it looks like The Royal Tenenbaums »

- Jordan Raup

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘King of New York,’ Eisenstein, Joe Dante, Pialat & More

5 August 2016 8:48 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Throw on your suede and pastels and prepare for the music-filled, light-streaked “Dim All the Lights: Disco and the Movies.”

Nicolas Roeg‘s Roald Dahl adaptation, The Witches, plays on Saturday morning; a print of Abel Ferrara‘s King of New York screens throughout the weekend; Oscar Micheaux‘s Ten Minutes to Live shows this Sunday. »

- Nick Newman

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Interview: Gordon Quinn on 50th Anniversary of Kartemquin Films

21 June 2016 10:16 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Two months ago, producer/director/cinematographer/editor Gordon Quinn received the Baadasssss Award from the 2016 Cimm Fest, for his longtime contributions to the cinema scene in Chicago through Kartemquin Films. The famous production house, known for their documentaries, is celebrating their 50th anniversary.

Kartemquin began in 1966 when three newly minted University of Chicago grads partnered to create socially conscious films, and took part of their names – Stan KARter, Jerry TEManer and Gordon QUINn – to form Kartemquin Films. Towards the end of the 1960s, Karter and Temaner had moved on, and the late Jerry Blumenthal stepped in to become the de facto fourth founder. It is Gordon Quinn that remains after 50 years, and he is the standard bearer for a film company that seeks to be a home for independent filmmakers who develop documentaries that deepen our understanding of society through everyday human drama – focusing on people whose lives are »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Hey Toronto! It's Time to Get Your De Palma Voyeurism Fix

16 June 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Over the course of what promises to be a long, hot, sticky summer, what better way to escape the streets and enter the sleazy, dreamy, violently dark ouvre of Brian De Palma. With the release of Jake Paltrow & Noah Baumbach's wonderful documentary interview, De Palma, getting released in Toronto this Friday, and the start of the summer programming at Tiff Lightbox, the festival's year round house of cinema is offering a near-complete retrospective of the works of the love-him/loath-him king of homage.   Famously back by Pauline Kael, and currently revered by Quentin Tarantino, De Palma is a disciple of not only Hitchcock which can be easily seen in most of De Palma's work, but also of classic film theory, from Sergei Eisenstein (his...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

»

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Hey Toronto! It's Time to Get Your De Palma Voyeurism Fix

16 June 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Over the course of what promises to be a long, hot, sticky summer, what better way to escape the streets and enter the sleazy, dreamy, violently dark ouvre of Brian De Palma. With the release of Jake Paltrow & Noah Baumbach's wonderful documentary interview, De Palma, getting released in Toronto this Friday, and the start of the summer programming at Tiff Lightbox, the festival's year round house of cinema is offering a near-complete retrospective of the works of the love-him/loath-him king of homage.   Famously back by Pauline Kael, and currently revered by Quentin Tarantino, De Palma is a disciple of not only Hitchcock which can be easily seen in most of De Palma's work, but also of classic film theory, from Sergei Eisenstein (his...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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10 questions for your new home viewing adventures

17 May 2016 12:31 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

I expect honest answers in the comments! 

Newish to DVD/BluRay

• The Boy -have you ever been scared of a doll? 

• Deadpool - What did you think of that junkyard finale?

Dirty Grandpa - Do you think Robert de Niro feels any shame about his filmography or just laughs all the way to the bank? 

Janis: Little Girl Blue - Will Amy Adams will ever actually make that Janis Joplin bio and how many movies do we really need about the singer anyway? 

The Program - Ben Foster. Scary or sexy?

• The Witch - Wouldst thou live deliciously?

Also new: Where to Invade Next, Captive, War & Peace (series), Theeb, Orange is the New Black Season 3

I am a boxer for the freedom of cinematic expression!

-Sergei Eisenstein (in Eisenstein in Guatanjuato)

Streaming

• 99 Homes - Was Michael Shannon robbed of an Oscar nom?

Eisenstein in Guanajuato - Have you ever seen a Peter Greenaway movie? »

- NATHANIEL R

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New to Streaming: ‘Kill Zone 2,’ ’99 Homes,’ ‘Jupiter Ascending,’ and More

13 May 2016 12:45 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

99 Homes (Ramin Bahrani)

Ramin Bahrani made a name for himself with three independent films over the last decade, focusing on humanity’s daily struggles, reinvented foreign lives in America, and a fundamental sense of decency. With 2012’s At Any Price and this year’s 99 Homes, Bahrani has twice returned to the festival that launched his career, presenting the evolution of those themes. Not coincidentally, the worst »

- TFS Staff

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Michael Radford to direct historical epic 'Alexander Nevsky'

12 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Feature to recount the story of the key figure in Russian history.

Two-time Oscar-nominee Michael Radford (Il PostinoThe Postman) is attached to direct historical epic Alexander Nevsky for Manuela Noble’s Wacha Films.

Radford penned the ambitious project’s screenplay, based on the real life man, who is considered one of the key figures in Russian history.

Born as a prince, Nevsky fled his home after his brother was murdered by crusaders, but he returned to lead his people into battle on multiple fronts, uniting the principalities of the medieval territory into what we now know as Russia. His actions led him to be canonized as a saint by the Orthodox Church.

The film promises both large-scale battle scenes on land and sea, as well a romantic plot between Nevsky and a warrior princess. The producers are in Cannes seeking potential partners for the big-budget project.

Nevsky was previously depicted in Sergei Eisenstein’s 1938 feature »

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Russian Revolution feature to mark centenary

11 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Portmanteau film will feature segments from young Russian directors.

A portmanteau movie is being planned to mark the centenary of the 1917 Russian Revolution, involving some of the most talented young directors in Russia.

The film, produced by the New People Film Company, is also set to include contributions from established international filmmakers. Four stories are initially being prepared.

The Fuel by Mikhail Arkhipov is the story of a self-taught blacksmith trying to save his village from starvation in 1918.

Arms and Palms Of October by Arseny Zanin will use the montage methods of legendary Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein, the director of Strike and Battleship Potemkin.

The Georgian by Nika Barabash and Andreas Konstandakes will tell the story of a petty thief (who looks remarkably like a young Stalin) who prospers in the storm of revolution.

Lenin by Denish Shibaev is set in Donbass in the present day and follows some eccentrics whose passion is restoring old Soviet »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Greenaway in Guanajuato

21 April 2016 6:43 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Peter GreenawayThe 1928 silent dramatization of the Russian revolution wasn’t easily swallowed upon its domestic release. Sergei Eisenstein had been commissioned to make the epic after his 1925 epic Battleship Potemkin caused a sensation, often cited as virtually inventing what we now call “montage” editing. But his resulting film, October: Ten Days that Shook the World (1928), attracted the ire of fierce Soviet powers. Where he had earlier excelled with a lush, sweeping visionary narrative far beyond his years, the director’s experimental style was now seen as unintelligible to mainstream audiences and vaguely pretentious.  Like many great and underappreciated talents after him, Eisenstein was forced into a series of edits, but he was always destined for trouble under Stalin’s rule. He was a genius of his craft, and certainly no mere propagandist. So how in blazing history did a Russian auteur find himself in bed with another man in Mexico, »

- Ben Rylan

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Interview: Peter Greenaway

20 April 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

Very few people can pull off wearing a navy blue pinstripe suit paired with a dark lined open-neck shirt. Yet not everyone is Peter Greenaway. The veteran British director, an intriguing, eloquent and eminently likeable subject, has been based in Amsterdam for the last twenty years. In a conversation as eclectic as his latest film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato, he spoke with CineVue's Matt Anderson about his admiration for the cinema of Sergei Eisenstein, intertextuality, film as propaganda, nudity and Donald Duck.

Matt Anderson: What is your earliest recollection of watching an Eisenstein film? Peter Greenaway: I was 15 - we're talking 1957. At the bottom end of Leytonstone there was a little grubby cinema called The State and it became our sort of Mecca. When you're a 15 year old adolescent you're very, very keen to see a naked woman and the chances are you're not going to see it in English cinema, »

- CineVue UK

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Eisenstein in Guanajuato review – playful, arch, self-absorbed

16 April 2016 11:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Peter Greenaway’s new film is as much about its own baroque trickery as it is the Russian director’s Mexican adventure

Peter Greenaway’s playfully personal account of Sergei Eisenstein’s time shooting his uncompleted project ¡Que Viva México! is an uneven montage of arch cinematic ticks (triptych split-screens, monochrome/colour fades, circling cameras etc), sociopolitical satire, penetrated naked buttocks (Eisenstein declares that he is losing his virginity 14 years after Russia did the same), and cod-religious meditation upon the creative process. Elmer Bäck provides a crazy-haired symphony of babbling speeches as Eisenstein, the Russian maestro who went to Hollywood to hang out with Chaplin and wound up in Mexico after being turned away by the paranoid Paramount. At times the script drifts into Woody Allen territory (“sex and death – the two non-negotiables”), but it’s never quite as funny or stylistically insightful as it thinks. As the drama progresses, »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Eisenstein in Guanajuato review – Greenaway's intriguing and intense imagined encounter

14 April 2016 3:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Peter Greenaway’s trademark mannerisms are there in this explicit, erotic speculative gay affair between the Russian film-maker and his Mexican host

Peter Greenaway’s familiar mannerisms are present in this new film: it unceasingly bombards you with images and ideas. There are the trademark rectilinear compositions, madly overcooked monologues and hammy acting, faces in closeup lit from below, reflections of Hockneyesque rippling water, an interest in architecture that Greenaway here complicates with woozily bending wide angles and Escher-type illusions: all unfolding on a single, unvarying rhetorical note.

Sometimes it’s insufferable but sometimes intriguing. It also has passion. Because there’s something else here, something very explicit and erotic. This is a speculation based on Sergei Eisenstein’s trip to Mexico in 1930 to work on a film project (ultimately doomed) called ¡Que Viva Mexico!, which was going to depict the history of Mexico leading up to the 1910 revolution. Greenaway »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Film Review: Eisenstein in Guanajuato

13 April 2016 12:47 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ Striking, controversial pieces of avant-garde filmmaking often contain one scene where the line in the sand of mainstream cinema is well and truly obliterated. The Odessa steps sequence of Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin stands as an unparalleled and much-studied example. After a number of early warning shots in Peter Greenaway's Eisenstein in Guanajuato - close-up full frontal nudity and graphic vomiting - the tipping point pushes the opening delirium over the edge. The director's latest meditation on sex, death and the nature of being, more a homage to the great Russian's groundbreaking technique than a biopic, achieves an uncomfortable early climax - if you'll excuse the pun.

»

- CineVue UK

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Daily | Hawks, Chaplin, Ivens

12 April 2016 1:04 PM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

As a new 4K restoration is released today, Criterion's posted Michael Sragow's essay on Howard Hawks's Only Angels Have Wings. Also in today's roundup: The Paris Review on Charles Chaplin becoming overwhelmed by fame in 1921, a new open access book on the work of Joris Ivens, an interview with Apichatpong Weerasethakul, a primer on Jerzy Skolimowski, the story behind Walt Disney's first adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book, a lecture on Jean Genet, a conference on Sergei Eisenstein and news of forthcoming films from Steven Spielberg and Barbra Streisand. » - David Hudson »

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Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Lord of the Rings

28 March 2016 12:16 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

We’re talking remakes again, and this time we’re dissecting not one but two popular films which were done previously as a single movie. This week, Cinelinx looks at Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring and Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.

Ever since J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic book trilogy first came out in the 50s’ there had been talk of adapting it into film but the epic scope of the story often deterred filmmakers of the era from taking on the task. In the early 70’s, director John Boorman (Deliverance, Excalibur) wanted to do a condensed 100-minute version of the whole trilogy but that plan fell apart.

Then, animator/producer Ralph Bakshi (American Pop, Cool World) unveiled his idea to do a two-part adaptation of the trilogy in animated form. Since Tolkien’s daughter was a huge fan of Bakshi’s previous »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Cannes’ Unveils Official Poster, With Nod to Jean-Luc Godard

21 March 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — The Cannes Film Festival is replacing stars with stairs on the official poster for its 69th edition.

In recent years, the event has selected iconic shots of classic film actors — Marilyn Monroe, Paul Newman, Marcello Mastroianni, Ingrid Bergman — to grace its posters. This year, however, it is a film still, selected from Jean-Luc Godard’s 1963 “Contempt,” that will set the tone for this year’s festival.

Tinted a radiant yellow-gold, the image depicts a man climbing the side of the Casa Malaparte — a modernist mansion overlooking the sea on the far east side of the Isle of Capri, accessible only to dreamers and cinemagoers.

Though we cannot make out the man’s face, the staircase itself draws the eye — and should look especially striking blown up to enormous dimensions and suspended over the red carpet entry to the Palais des Festivals, as in 1997, when a trompe l’oeil banner extended the entry staircase heavenward. »

- Peter Debruge

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Daily | Goings On | Kurosawa, Borden, Eisenstein

17 February 2016 11:32 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

New York's Film Forum presents a new 4K restoration of Akira Kurosawa's Ran (1985) from February 26 through March 3, but first, starting on Friday, Chris Marker's A.K., also from 1985 and also restored, sees a week-long run. More goings on: Lizzie Borden's Born in Flames and Regrouping at Anthology Film Archives, witches at Bam, Oscar Micheaux and Spencer Williams at Film Forum, Ernie Gehr at MoMA, Alexander Mackendrick in Paris, Sergei Eisenstein and Jacques Tati in London and what to see at the Glasgow Film Festival. » - David Hudson »

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From Battleship Potemkin to Baker Street: sightseeing with Sergei Eisenstein

13 February 2016 4:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

At the height of his notoriety, the great Russian director came to Britain for a whistlestop tour of everything from Bloomsbury to Windsor and Hampton Court. As a new exhibition opens up his dazzling sketchbooks, we reveal a different side of Eisenstein

Sergei Eisenstein was the most notorious filmmaker in the world in 1929, when he made a six-week visit to Britain. Three years earlier, his Battleship Potemkin had created a sensation in Germany and was banned outright in most countries outside Soviet Russia, for fear its impact would incite mutiny and revolution. But it was also admired by all who managed see it, from a young David Selznick starting his career in Hollywood to the British documentary impresario John Grierson, who used a private screening for MPs to extract funding for films to counteract such dangerous propaganda.

Potemkin received its long-delayed British premiere at a glittering private Film Society screening, »

- Ian Christie

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Axiom Films announces the UK release of Peter Greenaway’s Eisenstein in Guanajuato

10 February 2016 9:00 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Peter Greenaway’s Golden Bear nominated Eisenstein In Guanajuato (Elmer Bäck, Luis Alberti, Maya Zapata, Lisa Owen, Stelio Savante, Rasmus Slatis & Jakob Öhrman) will be released theatrically in the UK through independent British distributor Axiom Films on April 15th with the Blu-ray release scheduled for June 6th.

The film chronicles the journey of Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein when he traveled to Guanajuato in Mexico to shoot Que Viva Mexico in 1931, where he fell madly in love with his guide Canedo.

In addition to its Golden Bear nomination at the Berlin International Film Festival where it received its World Premiere, the film has been well received on the festival circuit, earning nominations and awards for Greenaway at the International Film Festival Of India, Nederlands Film Festival, Seattle Film Festival and Seville European Film Festival.

Eisenstein In Guanajuato will have its U.K. Premiere at the 2016 Glasgow Film Festival this month following its U. »

- Gary Collinson

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

1-20 of 30 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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