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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 1997

6 items from 2014


Movie Review - Rome, Open City (1945)

5 March 2014 11:35 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Rome, Open City (Italian: Roma, città aperta), 1945.

Directed by Roberto Rossellini.

Starring Anna Magnani, Aldo Fabrizi, Marcello Pagliero, Francesco Grandjacquet, Maria Michi and Vito Annichiarico.

Synopsis:

Roberto Rossellini directs this 1940s drama about the last days of the Nazi occupation of Italy during World War II. Resistance leader Giorgio Manfredi flees the Gestapo and seeks a place to hide with the help of his friend Francesco , his pregnant fiancée Pina and the priest who is due to marry them, Don Pietro Pellegrini. Giorgio's ex-girlfriend Marina betrays him and his fellow fighters to the Gestapo in order to get her hands on some luxury items and it's not long before the Nazis and the local police find him and Don Pietro. They are captured and tortured but will they crack under the pain or be executed for their silence?

“Life is mean and dirty” says Marina, a conflicted woman who has »

- Gary Collinson

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Oscar Digest: Best Foreign Language Film

19 February 2014 2:13 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Terence Johnson

Managing Editor

Oscar Diget continues with the look at an engrossing category, Best Foreign Language Film. From an aging playboy facing the end to a documentary about war torn Cambodia, the films in foreign language this year are an eclectic group with something to offer everyone. But which film will come out on top?

The Great Beauty

Logline: Jep Gambardella has seduced his way through the lavish nightlife of Rome for decades, but after his 65th birthday and a shock from the past, Jep looks past the nightclubs and parties to find a timeless landscape of absurd, exquisite beauty.

Pros: Fellini-esque storytelling, about dealing with age and past experiences, gorgeous visuals

Cons: ”It’s rich white people problems: The Moive!”, the movie doesn’t really leave you feeling anything, not an “important” film

History of the Country: Italy has one of the richest Oscar histories, having amassed »

- Terence Johnson

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Maximilian Schell obituary

2 February 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it. »

- Brian Baxter

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Maximilian Schell obituary

2 February 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it. »

- Brian Baxter

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Italian Composer Riz Ortolani Dead At 87

24 January 2014 5:08 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Italian soundtrack composer Riz Ortolani, who won a Grammy for his “Mondo Cane” theme “More,” and whose wide range of music for movies was featured in three Quentin Tarantino films and on the Dino Risi-directed classic “The Easy Life” (Il Sorpasso), among dozens of other titles, died in Rome on January 23.

He was 87. The cause was reportedly due to complications from bronchitis.

Born on March 25, 1926, as Riziero Ortolani, in Pesaro, Italy, the prolific composer started his career in his early twenties working as a musical arranger for the orchestra of Italian pubcaster Rai, before forming his own orchestra. During the 1950s he and his Riz Ortolani orchestra wound up in Los Angeles and  worked at famed night club Ciro’s on the Sunset Strip.

Ortolani’s career in movie soundtracks started in 1962 with Gualtiero Jacopetti’s seminal creepy exploitation docu “Mondo Cane,” which screened at Cannes.

The “Mondo Cane »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Coming of Age in Georgia: In Bloom Belongs in the Neorealism Tradition

7 January 2014 9:00 PM, PST | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

While the neorealist tradition remains best remembered for its formal innovations — for the unprecedented naturalism afforded by the style — its most significant feature may simply be the look of the time and place it captured.

In the films of Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini, in particular, unadorned depictions of postwar Italy form a gallery of desolation and despair, cityscapes reduced to mere rubble. It's in this sense that neorealism is the tradition to which Nana Ekvtimishvili and Simon Gross's In Bloom urgently belongs.

This is a film for which the landscape, both social and material, is paramount: Its conception of Georgia in the aftermath of its separation from the Soviet Union, based on Ekvtimishvili's own experience, is founded in a »

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6 items from 2014


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