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The Witches (1967) Now Available on Blu-ray From Arrow Academy

The Witches (1967) is now available on Blu-ray from Arrow Academy. It can be ordered Here

In the mid-sixties, famed producer Dino De Laurentiis brought together the talents of five celebrated Italian directors for an anthology film. Their brief was simple: to direct an episode in which Silvana Mangano (Bitter Rice, Ludwig) plays a witch.

Luchino Visconti (Ossessione, Death in Venice) and screenwriter Cesare Zavattini (Bicycle Thieves) open the film with The Witch Burned Alive, about a famous actress and a drunken evening that leads to unpleasant revelations. Civic Sense is a lightly comic interlude from Mauro Bolognini (The Lady of the Camelias) with a dark conclusion, and The Earth as Seen from the Moon sees Italian comedy legend Totò team up with Pier Paolo Pasolini (Theorem) for the first time for a tale of matrimony and a red-headed father and son. Franco Rosso (The Woman in the Painting) concocts a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Emmy-Winning TV Director Peter Baldwin Dies at 86

Emmy-Winning TV Director Peter Baldwin Dies at 86
Peter Baldwin, who started as an actor and went on to become a prolific TV director throughout the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, died Nov. 19 in Pebble Beach, Calif. He was 86.

Baldwin won a Primetime Emmy Award for directing “The Wonder Years” and a Cable Ace Award for “Dream On.”

Born in Winnetka, Ill., he was discovered by a Hollywood talent scout in his senior year at Stanford. He became one of Paramount’s “Golden Circle of Newcomers” and appeared in films including “Stalag 17,” “Little Boy Lost” and Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Ten Commandments.”

He served three years in the Navy and returned to Paramount, where he appeared in “The Tin Star” and “Teacher’s Pet” with Clark Gable and Doris Day.

After touring with Julie Harris in “The Warm Peninsula” play, Baldwin moved to Italy, where he appeared in films by Robert Rossellini, Dino Risi and Francesco Rosi. There he started
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter Baldwin, Actor and Emmy-Winning TV Director, Dies at 86

Peter Baldwin, an actor turned prolific Emmy-winning TV director with credits including The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Sanford and Son, Murphy Brown and The Wonder Years, has died. He was 86.

Baldwin died Sunday at his home in Pebble Beach, California, his son, Drew Baldwin, CEO of Tubefilter and creator and executive producer of the Streamy Awards, announced.

A former actor and contract player at Paramount Pictures, Baldwin cut his teeth behind the camera in Italy when he served as an assistant director under the legendary Vittorio De Sica on Woman Times Seven (1967)...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Peter Baldwin, Actor and Emmy-Winning TV Director, Dies at 86

Peter Baldwin, Actor and Emmy-Winning TV Director, Dies at 86
Peter Baldwin, an actor turned prolific Emmy-winning TV director with credits including The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Sanford and Son, Murphy Brown and The Wonder Years, has died. He was 86.

Baldwin died Sunday at his home in Pebble Beach, California, his son, Drew Baldwin, CEO of Tubefilter and creator and executive producer of the Streamy Awards, announced.

A former actor and contract player at Paramount Pictures, Baldwin cut his teeth behind the camera in Italy when he served as an assistant director under the legendary Vittorio De Sica on Woman Times Seven (1967)...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Lessons For Hollywood From Foreign Films — Nyff Critics Academy

  • Indiewire
Lessons For Hollywood From Foreign Films — Nyff Critics Academy
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival.

In today’s intense political climate, the battle between nationalism and globalism is a widespread conflict, one that emerges in part from being alienated by a system that is unsympathetic and uncaring. Hollywood reflects this alienation by what it chooses to ignore: The industry continually avoids touchy film subjects, such as the lives of working-class Americans. The studio’s largest, mass-produced films play it safe by focusing on the all-inclusive entertainment value of superheroes and furry animals.

One might argue that the onus lies on American audiences, who may not be interested in realism, and perhaps it’s just a business decision on part of the studios. However, within the past seven years, American independent cinema has produced successful,
See full article at Indiewire »

Bob Hawkins, Longtime Variety Journalist in Italy, Dies at 93

Bob Hawkins, who spent more than 50 years at Variety, writing film reviews, covering film festivals, and oversreeing Variety‘s Rome office, died Oct. 14 in Rome. He was 93.

Hawkins was one of the first photographers to cover the Cannes Film Festival. He explained in the Variety book “Cannes: Fifty Years of Sun, Sex & Celluloid” that there were just a handful of paparazzi in the 1950s, although the term had yet to be invented by his friend Federico Fellini. The photographers rotated exclusives among themselves, and Hawkins remembered the time Grace Kelly speared him with a metal spike attached to a flower by accident, then granted him an exclusive photo as an apology.

Robert Hawkins was born in Genoa, Italy and attended Princeton U., where he started out writing movie reviews. Fluent in half a dozen languages, his love for film began at an early age when he traveled to the Venice Film Festival with his father before WWII.

During
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100

Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100
Danielle Darrieux, one of the great French movie stars, died Wednesday in Bois-le-Roi, France. She was 100.

The star of director Max Ophuls’ classic early ’50s films “La Ronde” and “The Earrings of Madame de…” and Anatole Litvak’s 1936 “Mayerling” also made some films in Hollywood and, late in life, starred, with an all-star cast of fellow French female movie stars, in Francois Ozon’s “8 Femmes.”

In Ozon’s 2002 delightful musical mystery-comedy “8 Femmes,” the actress played Deneuve’s mother again, starring along with Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Beart, Fanny Ardant, Virginie Ledoyen and Ludivine Sagnier. The entire cast received a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival for outstanding artistic achievement as well as the European Film Award for best actress.

Born in Bordeaux, Darrieux was raised in Paris. At the Paris Conservatory she studied the cello and piano.

Darrieux auditioned for a secondary role as a willful teenager in the 1931 musical “Le Bal” when she was only 14, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Death of Danielle Darrieux by Richard Mowe - 2017-10-19 10:54:21

Danielle Darrieux in her Fifties hey-day Photo: UniFrance

The star acted right up to the present decade Photo: Unifrance The veteran French actress Danièle Darrieux (also credited as Danièle) has died in Paris at the age of 100.

She was particularly well known for her work with director Max Ophuls including La Ronde, made in 1950, in which she played a married woman who meets a young man (Daniel Gélin) for an assignation.

Two years later she worked with Opuls again on Le Plaisir as a good time girl, regretting her lost innocence. In 1953 she and Ophuls made the highly acclaimed The Earrings Of Madame De … in which she played opposite Vittorio De Sica.

Later she appeared in a tepid version of Lady Chatterley’s Lover in 1955 but her later career was rescued from the doldrums by `Jacques Demy who offered her singing roles in The Young Girls Of Rochefort in 1967 and
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Portrait of Jennie

David O. Selznick’s marvelous romantic fantasy ode to Jennifer Jones was almost wholly unappreciated back in 1948. It’s one of those peculiar pictures that either melts one’s heart or doesn’t. Backed by a music score adapted from Debussy, just one breathy “Oh Eben . . . “ will turn average romantics into mush.

Portrait of Jennie

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / B&W w/ Color Insert / 1:37 flat Academy / 86 min. / Street Date October 24, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jennifer Jones, Joseph Cotten, Ethel Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Cecil Kellaway, David Wayne, Albert Sharpe.

Cinematography: Joseph H. August

Production Designers: J. MacMillan Johnson, Joseph B. Platt

Original Music: Dimitri Tiomkin, also adapting themes from Claude Debussy; Bernard Herrmann

Written by Leonardo Bercovici, Peter Berneis, Paul Osborn, from the novella by Robert Nathan

Produced by David O. Selznick

Directed by William Dieterle

Once upon a time David O. Selznick’s Portrait of Jennie was an
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Florida Project,” which has just started its platform release across the country, what is the greatest child performance in a film?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian, Vanity Fair

I can agonize over this question or I can go at this Malcolm Gladwell “Blink”-style. My answer is Tatum O’Neal in “Paper Moon.” She’s just so funny and tough, which of course makes the performance all the more heartbreaking. She won the freaking Oscar at age 10 for this and I’d really love to give a more deep cut response, but why screw around? Paper Moon is a perfect film and she is the lynchpin.
See full article at Indiewire »

26 Pictures of Sophia Loren That Will Have You Moving to Italy and Starting a New Life

  • Popsugar
26 Pictures of Sophia Loren That Will Have You Moving to Italy and Starting a New Life
Living legend Sophia Loren celebrated her 83rd birthday this week, and it instantly inspired us to take a walk down memory lane - or, more appropriately, a corsia di memoria. The iconic actress was born in Rome on Sept. 20, 1934, and began her film career at the age of 15. She starred in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women in 1960, and her role as Cesira earned her the best actress Academy Award in 1962; she became the first person to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She also has a Grammy! Sophia has become a symbol of la dolce vita, from her stunning beauty looks (that cat eye!) and enviable curves to her wise, insightful, humorous outlook on life. Here, we pay homage to the wise woman who famously said of her figure, "Everything you see I owe to spaghetti."
See full article at Popsugar »

La Poison

La Poison

Blu-ray

Criterion

1951 / 1:33 / Street Date August 22, 2017

Starring: Michel Simon, Germaine Reuver

Cinematography: Jean Bachelet

Film Editor: Raymond Lamy

Written by Sacha Guitry

Produced by Jean Le Duc, Alain Poiré

Music: Louiguy

Directed by Sacha Guitry

One of the most insightful commentaries on Sacha Guitry’s La Poison can be found right there on the cover of Criterion’s beautiful new blu ray release, a typically “warts and all” portrait by Drew Freidman of the film’s stars, Michel Simon and Germaine Reuver. The film’s diabolic mix of humor and horror is illuminated by Freidman’s precise rendering of Simon’s sagging jowls, Reuver’s venomous stare and the dingy trappings of the cramped little kitchen that threatens to suffocate these damned souls before they can get around to killing each other.

Filmed in just eleven days in 1951 by the speedy Guitry, La Poison tells the story of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Greatest Heist Comedies of All-Time

There’s nothing revelatory or new about adding a dose of the comedic to a crime picture, but the heist comedy is just a small corner of a vast and beloved cinematic landscape, as of recently, dominated by one filmmaker: Steven Soderbergh.

Responsible for four acclaimed entries in the genre, including Out of Sight and the Ocean’s 11 trilogy, Soderbergh has thankfully ended his so-called retirement and returned to film and the world of heist comedies with his newest, Logan Lucky, now playing in theaters. The film’s plot follows Jimmy Logan (Channing Tatum) a family man who plans to rob the Charlotte Motor Speedway in North Carolina, only to find he and his crew (Adam Driver, Daniel Craig and Riley Keough) must do the job while a Nascar race is underway.

To celebrate Soderbergh’s return with Logan Lucky, we’ve decided to look back at the greatest heist comedies of all-time.
See full article at The Film Stage »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel this August

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This August will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Tuesday, August 1

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: These Boots and Mystery Train

Music is at the heart of this program, which pairs a zany music video by Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki with a tune-filled career highlight from American independent-film pioneer Jim Jarmusch. In the 1993 These Boots, Kaurismäki’s band of pompadoured “Finnish Elvis” rockers, the Leningrad Cowboys, cover a Nancy Sinatra classic in their signature deadpan style. It’s the perfect prelude to Jarmusch’s 1989 Mystery Train, a homage to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll and the musical legacy of Memphis, featuring appearances by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Joe Strummer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

NYC Weekend Watch: Edgar Wright’s Favorites, ‘Thx 1138,’ Jules Dassin & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

BAMcinematek

Edgar Wright presents a series of crime films, while le cinema du southern gothic runs.

Metrograph

The directorial debuts of George Lucas and David Byrne play as part of “Welcome to Metrograph A-z.”

A series of concert films screen this weekend.

Museum of the Moving Image

Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1941, and Empire of the Sun all have screenings.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rare Cannes Swedish Favorite, AIDS Drama and Best Actor Winner Phoenix Oscar Chances?

Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' with Claes Bang: 'Gobsmackingly weird' Cannes Film Festival favorite may have a tough time landing a Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award nomination. Ruben Östlund's comedy-drama is totally unrelated to Jehane Noujaim's 2013 Oscar-nominated political documentary of the same title, which refers to downtown Cairo's Tahrir Square. Cannes' Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' & other Official Competition favorites' Oscar chances Screenwriter-director Ruben Östlund's The Square was the Palme d'Or winner at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, which wrapped up on May 28. (See list of Palme d'Or and other 2017 Cannes winners further below.) Clocking in at about 2 hours and 20 minutes, Östlund's unusual comedy-drama revolving around the chaotic p.r. campaign to promote the opening of the titular installation – a symbolic square of light – at a contemporary art museum in Stockholm has been generally well-received by critics. In the opinion of The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘Le Trou’ Trailer: Jacques Becker’s Nerve-Wracking Prison Break Drama Gets a Stunning Restoration — Watch

‘Le Trou’ Trailer: Jacques Becker’s Nerve-Wracking Prison Break Drama Gets a Stunning Restoration — Watch
Praised for its realism and intensity, Jacques Becker’s 1960 prison break drama “Le Trou” is now bound for a pristine-looking 4K restoration, thanks to Rialto Pictures and Studio Canal. A nerve-wracking drama based on a true story, the film is adapted from the book “The Break” by ex-con José Giovanni and has been hailed as not just one of French cinema’s best films, but perhaps the best. (Lofty, we know.)

Based on a 1947 escape attempt enacted by five prisoners at France’s La Sante Prison, Becker used a slew of non-actors — including Jean Keraudy, who actually participated in the daring events the film portrays — to tell a gripping story that remains one of cinema’s most unnerving depictions of real-life drama.

Read More: ‘Il Boom’ Trailer: Vittorio De Sica’s Underseen Comedy Bound for Restoration and First-Ever U.S. Release — Watch

The film picks up after four prisoners and
See full article at Indiewire »

Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy

Rome Open City, Paisan, Germany Year Zero: Filmed mostly on the streets in newly-liberated territory, Roberto Rossellini’s gripping war-related shows are blessed with new restorations but still reflect their rough origins. The second picture, the greater masterpiece, looks as if it were improvised out of sheer artistic will.

Roberto Rosselini’s War Trilogy

Rome Open City, Paisan, Germany Year Zero

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 500 (497, 498, 499)

1945-1948 / B&W / 1:37 & 1:33 flat full frame / 302 minutes / Street Date July 11, 2017 / available from the Criterion Collection 79.96

Starring: Aldo Fabrizi, Anna Magnani; Dots Johnson, Harriet White Medin; Edmund Moeschke, Franz-Otto Krüger.

Cinematography: Ubaldo Arata; Otello Martelli; Robert Julliard.

Film Editor: Eraldo Da Roma

Original Music: Renzo Rossellini

Written by Sergio Amidei, Alberto Consiglio, Federico Fellini; Klaus Mann, Marcello Pagliero, Alfred Hayes, Vasco Pratolini; Max Kolpé, Carlo Lizzani.

Directed by Roberto Rossellini

Criterion released an identical-for-content DVD set of this trilogy in 2010; the new Blu-ray
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Critics Slam ‘The Book of Henry’ as ‘Beatriz at Dinner’ and ‘Paris Can Wait’ Expand Well

Critics Slam ‘The Book of Henry’ as ‘Beatriz at Dinner’ and ‘Paris Can Wait’ Expand Well
At the specialty box office, reviews can have a huge impact. This weekend, “The Book of Henry” (Focus Features), Colin Trevorrow’s return to indie films, was scorched by critics and summoned only a mediocre start in 579 theaters ($1.4 million). On the other hand, the best per-theater-average came from “Hare Krishna” (Abramorama), a documentary the New York Times, normally critical in launching any specialized release, chose not to include among its reviews. It managed over $21,000 in one Manhattan theater.

While IFC’s Northern Ireland political story “The Journey” also delivered a surprisingly strong New York opening, the most encouraging news of the weekend was the impressive expansion for “Beatriz at Dinner” (Roadside Attractions).

Opening

The Book of Henry (Focus) – Metacritic: 28

$1,407,000 in 579 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $2,431

Trevorrow broke out with Sundance indie “Safety Not Guaranteed,” which grossed a healthy $4 million, followed by blockbuster “Jurassic World.” This anemic personal project will
See full article at Indiewire »

Filmadrid & Mubi: The Video Essay—"Telefoni Neri"

The Video Essay is a joint project of Mubi and Filmadrid Festival Internacional de Cine. Film analysis and criticism found a completely new and innovative path with the arrival of the video essay, a relatively recent form that already has its own masters and is becoming increasingly popular. The limits of this discipline are constantly expanding; new essayists are finding innovative ways to study the history of cinema working with images. With this non-competitive section of the festival both Mubi and Filmadrid will offer the platform and visibility the video essay deserves. The seven selected works will be shown during the dates of Filmadrid (June 8 - 17, 2017) on Mubi’s cinema publication, the Notebook. Also there will be a free public screening of the selected works during the festival. The selection was made by the programmers of Mubi and Filmadrid.Telefoni NeriA video essay by Hannah LeißAs a reaction to the
See full article at MUBI »
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