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1-20 of 90 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Kristen Bell Reveals Veronica Mars Miniseries Status, Hails The Good Place

21 July 2016 4:12 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Kristen Bell was in a very good place when she caught up with Michael Ausiello at TVLine’s Comic-Con studio presented by Zte.

RelatedFall TV First Impression: NBC’s The Good Place

In the video Q&A above, the sunny actress offers an enthusiastic tour of The Good Place, NBC’s new, Mike Schur-created comedy about a very bad girl who, due to a clerical error, ends up… up there… after dying a mortifying death.

Bell explains the interesting/amusing “points” system for those living on Earth that The Good Place pivots around, and also shares her breathless reaction »

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Comic-Con San Diego 2016: All of the Screenings, Panels and Events You Can't Miss

19 July 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Headed to Comic-Con 2016 in San Diego this weekend? We're here to help you prepare to tackle it all. From exciting film screenings - like Oliver Stone's Snowden - to movie-centric panels, there's a lot to see and do at the San Diego Convention Center over just four days. Start your week laughing with Seth Rogen about his naughty, animated comedy Sausage Party and finish up by learning how to craft your own, personal R2-D2. Here's a rundown of some of the best film screenings, panels and events to check out at Comic-Con. Thursday, July 2110:00 a.m.: Feed »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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Comic-Con San Diego 2016: All of the Screenings, Panels and Events You Can't Miss

19 July 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Headed to Comic-Con 2016 in San Diego this weekend? We're here to help you prepare to tackle it all. From exciting film screenings - like Oliver Stone's Snowden - to movie-centric panels, there's a lot to see and do at the San Diego Convention Center over just four days. Start your week laughing with Seth Rogen about his naughty, animated comedy Sausage Party and finish up by learning how to craft your own, personal R2-D2. Here's a rundown of some of the best film screenings, panels and events to check out at Comic-Con. Thursday, July 2110:00 a.m.: Feed »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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Fall TV First Impression: The Good Place

12 July 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

The broadcast networks have nearly 20 shows debuting this fall, including new sitcoms from Kevin James and Matt LeBlanc, the story of Mlb’s first female player and Michael Weatherly’s NCIS follow-up. To help you prep for it all, TVLine is offering First Impressions of the not-for-review pilots.

Next up on our list….

The Show | NBC’s The Good Place (Thursdays at 8:30/7:30c, following an hour-long sneak preview on Monday, Sept. 19 at 10 pm)

The Competition | ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy, CBS’ Thursday Night Football (and then The Great Indoors, new), Fox’s Rosewood and The CW’s Legends of Tomorrow »

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‘The Leftovers’ Star Carrie Coon Lands Female Lead in ‘Fargo’ Season 3

11 July 2016 12:23 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Carrie Coon has landed the female lead in “Fargo” season 3, Variety has confirmed.

The Leftovers” star will play opposite Ewan McGregor in the third season of FX’s critically acclaimed anthology series, which switches up the cast from season to season.

Coon will portray Gloria Burgle, a practical woman who grabs the fire extinguisher when the bacon catches fire and everyone else panics. Gloria is the chief of the Eden Valley police, and a newly divorced mother who is struggling to understand this new world around her where people connect more intimately with their phones than the people right in front of them.

Previously announced, McGregor will play two roles — brothers Emmit and Ray Stussy. Emmit is the parking lot king of Minnesota, a handsome and successful real estate mogul. Ray is a pot-bellied, balding parole officer who peaked in high school and blames his brother for his misfortunes.

Coon, who »

- Elizabeth Wagmeister

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San Diego Comic-Con 2016: Your Complete Guide

11 July 2016 12:15 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

In 1971, the 300-or-so people pawing through cardboard boxes of dusty comic books couldn't have possibly imagined that they were standing in what would become the cradle of nerd civilization. From a small meetup for diehard geeks, San Diego Comic-Con has grown into one of the largest and most feverishly anticipated pop-cultural events of the year. Thousands upon thousands of industry types, journalists, the devout faithful (and the suckers they've handsomely paid to stand in line as proxies) and cosplaying fans of all stripes will descend upon the city from July »

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Emmy Dream Ballots: The Most Deserving Limited Series & Movie Nominees

7 July 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

On Thursday, July 14, the Television Academy will announce the nominees for the 68th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, and we have all the faith in the world they’ll get every single choice just right.

Ok, maybe they won’t, but only because the 19,000-plus voters literally can’t get every choice right. Unless all the categories squeeze out miraculous ties resulting in extra nominees — similar to last year’s Comedy Supporting Actress category — there are simply too many outstanding series and performers to fit on the overall ballot.

So our choices below not only represent IndieWire’s highest recommendations in the top-line limited series and movie categories, but also some of the shows and performers overlooked thus far in the campaign season. On a related note, category placement is determined, aptly, by our own wishes and not the submission guidelines of the TV Academy. It would be grand to hear »

- Ben Travers

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Emmy Dream Ballots: The Most Deserving Limited Series & Movie Nominees

7 July 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On Thursday, July 14, the Television Academy will announce the nominees for the 68th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, and we have all the faith in the world they’ll get every single choice just right.

Ok, maybe they won’t, but only because the 19,000-plus voters literally can’t get every choice right. Unless all the categories squeeze out miraculous ties resulting in extra nominees — similar to last year’s Comedy Supporting Actress category — there are simply too many outstanding series and performers to fit on the overall ballot.

So our choices below not only represent IndieWire’s highest recommendations in the top-line limited series and movie categories, but also some of the shows and performers overlooked thus far in the campaign season. On a related note, category placement is determined, aptly, by our own wishes and not the submission guidelines of the TV Academy. It would be grand to hear »

- Ben Travers

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The Play Where Everybody Knows Your Name: Cheers Live on Stage Is Coming

20 June 2016 8:35 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sam and Diane are back - and they're touring across the country. Fans of iconic TV series Cheers will get a chance to revisit their favorite characters with a brand new stage show. Cheers Live on Stage is a two-act comedy, based on the patrons of one of Boston's most famous fictional bars. Drawing from the series' first season in 1982, the production will feature 14 actors and run for two hours, according to the Associated Press."I took season 1 of Cheers and put it all into a big pot and cooked it up and boiled it down," show writer Erik Forrest Jackson told the AP. »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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NBC Fall Premiere Dates: Chicago Fire's October Start, Blindspot's Wednesday Relaunch and Others

15 June 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

NBC this year is the first broadcaster out of the gate with their Fall TV premiere plan, and it kicks off on Sept. 14 with Blindspot‘s Season 2 opener leading out of the America’s Got Talent finale. Chicago Fire meanwhile will bring up the rear, not launching Season 5 until mid-October.

RelatedNBC Fall Schedule: Blacklist, Blindspot on the Move, Comedies Return to Thursday

Also of note, the new Kristen Bell/Ted Danson comedy The Good Place is getting a very good showcase — airing a sneak preview after The Voice’s Season 11 opener before moving to its regular Thursday home — while the »

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NBC Sets Fall Premiere Dates for 2016-17 Season

15 June 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

NBC has set the premiere dates for its 2016-17 fall schedule, kicking off in mid-September. New shows debuting this fall include freshman drama “This Is Us”; time-travel thriller “Timeless” and Mike Schur comedy “The Good Place.”

“Sunday Night Football” kicks off on Thursday, Sept. 8 when the champion Denver Broncos host the Carolina Panthers (8:30 p.m. Et/5:30 p.m. Pt) in a Super Bowl rematch. Three days later on Sept. 11, the show travels to Arizona as the Cardinals play the New England Patriots (8:30 p.m. Et/5:30 p.m. Pt).

The sophomore season of “Blindspot” bows Wednesday, Sept. 14 at 10 p.m., immediately following the season finale of “America’s Got Talent.” The 11th season of “The Voice” begins Monday, Sept. 19 with new coaches Alicia Keys and Miley Cyrus joining Adam Levine and Blake Shelton, and the powerhouse vocal competition will serve as the lead-in for back-to-back episodes of Mike Schur’s freshman comedy “The Good Place,” starring Kristen Bell and Ted Danson, offering a prime perch for the laffer. “The Voice” has previously been used to launch hit dramas “Blindspot” and “The Blacklist,” which starts the new comedy off in a very good place indeed. The new comedy will then shift to its normal 8:30 p.m. Thursday timeslot three days later, on Sept. 22.

This Is Us,” starring Mandy Moore, Milo Ventimiglia and Sterling K. Brown, will debut Tuesday, Sept. 20 at 10 p.m. following “The Voice,” and continue in that time period until shifting to its normal 9 p.m. slot on Tuesday, Oct. 11.

Wednesday, Sept. 21 marks the time period premiere of “Blindspot” at 8 p.m., followed by the 18th season premiere of “Law & Order: Svu” and Season 4 debut of “Chicago P.D.

On Thursday, Sept. 22, “Superstore” returns for its second season, followed by the timeslot premiere of “The Good Place.” At 9 p.m., “Chicago Med” will return, followed by the Season 4 premiere of “The Blacklist” at 10 p.m.

Friday, Sept. 23 marks the return of “Caught on Camera with Nick Cannon” at 8 p.m. and “Dateline NBC” from 9-11 p.m.

Monday, Oct. 3 at 10 p.m. sees the debut of “Timeless,” from Eric Kripke (“Revolution,” “Supernatural”) and Shawn Ryan (“The Shield”), about a history professor who teams with a scientist and soldier to try and prevent a mysterious criminal from changing the past, and the following week, on Tuesday, Oct. 11, “This Is Us” makes its time period premiere at 9 p.m., followed by the Season 5 premiere of “Chicago Fire.”

Check out NBC’s full fall lineup below.

Wednesday Sept. 14

10-11: Blindspot

Monday, Sept. 19

8-10: The Voice

10-11: The Good Place (preview)

Tuesday, Sept. 20

8-10: The Voice

10-11: This Is Us

Wednesday, Sept. 21

8-9: Blindspot (time period premiere)

9-10: Law & Order: Svu

10-11: Chicago P.D.

Thursday, Sept. 22

8-8:30: Superstore

8:30-9: The Good Place (time period premiere)

9-10: Chicago Med

10-11: The Blacklist

Friday, Sept. 23

8-9: Caught On Camera With Nick Cannon

9-11: Dateline NBC

Monday, Oct. 3

10-11: Timeless

Tuesday Oct. 11

9-10: This Is Us (time period premiere)

10-11: Chicago Fire

»

- Laura Prudom

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Find Out NBC's Fall TV Premiere Dates for the 2016-17 Season

15 June 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Forget summer, NBC is ready for fall! The network has announced the fall premiere dates for the 2016-17 TV season, and your poor DVR has until Wednesday, Sept. 14 before it starts working overtime again. The first show to return to the schedule is Blindspot, which will debut at 10 p.m. on Sept. 14 after the finale of America's Got Talent. Then, on Monday, Sept. 19, things really ramp up. The Voice will debut its eleventh season—including the debut of new coaches Miley Cyrus and Alicia Keys—followed by the premiere of the new Ted Danson-Kristen Bell comedy The Good Place. On Tuesday of that week, you'll get your first glimpse at the new show that will probably make you cry the most, This Is Us (just trust us »

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TV Is Addicted to Addicts, But Does It Get Dependence Right?

14 June 2016 5:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There’s a lingering perception in pop culture that drug use is glamorous and au courant, something that builds character and renders a person sexy and intriguing, like an advanced degree in comp lit or the ability to acquire foreign languages easily. See Don Draper with a martini in one hand and a beautiful mistress in the other. Or Jessa on “Girls,” whose bohemian clothes and Rapunzel hair perpetuate the illusion that cocaine-cum-heroin junkies forever maintain the appearance of a Free People catalogue model. In real life, heroin junkies develop abscesses and hacking coughs, sores on their lips and acne. They look like ghosts. Even on “Nurse Jackie,” one of the decade’s most convincing portraits of drug addiction, there were just so many episodes where you had to suspend your disbelief — Jackie should have been dead by season two. Of course, then we would have missed out on five more seasons and Edie Falco’s most dynamic career performance, for which she won the 2010 Emmy for lead actress in a drama.

Because of addiction’s prevalence in our society — according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2014 there were 10,574 heroin overdose deaths in the U.S. — TV is teeming with characters struggling with drugs and alcohol, from “Shameless” to “Mr. Robot” to IFC’s “Maron” and the sobriety sitcom “Mom.” And some shows do it well; if ever a series unflinchingly — if, occasionally, satirically — captured the gory violence of the crystal meth trade it’s “Breaking Bad,” for which Bryan Cranston pretty much monopolized the actor in a drama series category, winning the Emmy an astounding four times.

The Television Academy, in fact, has a history of rewarding small-screen lushes. For his iconic turn as the perpetually soused Hawkeye on “Mash,” Alan Alda won two actor Emmys. Candice Bergen won the Emmy for actress in a comedy series five times for playing a recovering alcoholic on “Murphy Brown,” and Ted Danson scored two Emmys for playing sobered-up baseball player-turned-bar proprietor Sam Malone on “Cheers.” Even Jim Parsons, who plays socially challenged theoretical physicist Sheldon Cooper on the “The Big Bang Theory,” nabbed his first Emmy win for an episode in which he gets sloppy drunk. Hollywood, it seems, loves a character who can’t handle his booze.

But rare is the series that deals with addiction in a way that accurately depicts the frustrating, oft fatal, and sometimes even boring reality of what it is — a disease. There’s a general tendency among critics to assess shows on the strength of their entertainment value, and not how truthfully they convey what it’s actually like to be an addict — or live with one. “Ray Donovan” tackles heady addiction-adjacent subject matter like molestation and Irish-Catholic broods, and “Orange Is the New Black” features a cast of addict convicts, but there isn’t a small-screen counterpart examining, say, the lives of depressed, college-educated worker bees quietly dependent on benzo­diazepines. And there are millions of those people.

Granted, most facets of addiction probably wouldn’t make for good television. Comedies like “Broad City” and “Freaks and Geeks” aside, in the real world there is nothing less interesting than watching potheads get stoned.

A life of abstinence, however, can be hilarious, which is why comedies like “Mom” and “Catastrophe,” with all of their off-color, self-effacing wit, so successfully chronicle the journey of the addict in recovery. On “Mom,” Emmy-winner Allison Janney and Anna Faris play a sober mother-daughter team coping with booze cravings, romantic dysfunction, and the daily challenges of being sober physically — but not necessarily emotionally. On Amazon’s “Catastrophe,” Rob Delaney nails the part of an affectionate and loving but also conventionally narcissistic man-child who quit drinking after he “shit at [his] sister’s wedding.”

What’s especially refreshing about both of these shows is that they debunk the myth that once you get clean you’re suddenly “fixed.” Instead, they’re predicated on the fact that addiction is a disease that people live with for their entire lives, whether or not they’re actively getting wasted. What’s so commendable about “Mom” especially is that it examines what most people do not understand — that sobriety can be the most difficult aspect of alcoholism.

On the flip side, Freeform’s now-canceled “Recovery Road” was a show that missed the mark entirely, serving up a candy-coated rendering of rehab that belies most everything we know to be true. The series’ collective flaws are best summed up in one line, said by a high school guidance counselor to Maddie (Jessica Sula), a strung-out party girl she’s threatening with expulsion unless she moves into a sober living facility: “You can go to school by day and spend your evenings getting sober.” As if sobriety is a part-time job. Maddie tries to keep her situation a secret, and the surrounding adults seem Ok with that — even though honesty is one of the primary tenets of recovery. You can tell what the network was trying to do — create a show about addiction that parents could watch with their kids. But that’s a pointless task if it doesn’t ring true.

“Shameless,” for all of its outlandishness — patriarchal drunk Frank Gallagher (Emmy-nominated William H. Macy) has survived liver failure, a kitchen fire, and being tossed over a bridge into a river — is the series that perhaps most accurately captures the pervasiveness with which alcoholism wreaks havoc on a family. Everybody suffers. Everybody is powerless. Denial rips through the family line. Whether they are using or not, all of the Gallagher kids are living with the –ism.

When it comes down to it, no fictional TV series can definitively capture the brutal truth of how drugs and alcohol destroy people’s lives. Rather, it’s documentaries like Steven Okazaki’s brilliant and harrowing “Heroin: Cape Cod” — which focuses on eight young addicts — that paint the starkest, most blistering, and most realistic portrait of addiction. Because addiction isn’t pretty, and it’s often not something that you want to tune in to watch.

»

- Malina Saval

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These shows would make great Emmy nominees

14 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Yesterday, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences opened voting for this year's Emmy nominations, including the public release of ballots showing who submitted themselves and in what categories. That means it's time for my annual thought exercise, where I pretend that I'm an Academy member and try to figure out how I would fill out my ballot in the major categories. The whole thing becomes trickier with each passing year, just because there are so many shows and performances worthy of at least consideration: when I made my first run through the ballot, jotting down contenders in each big category, I wound up with 26 potential Outstanding Comedy Series nominees, for instance. It does give me a sense of how challenging this must be for the actual Emmy voters, especially since most of them have much less time to actually watch TV than I do. I'm using the same rules as usual: 1)I only consider shows and performances that were submitted. So even if I wanted to put, say, Hugh Dancy on my ballot for his work in the final season of Hannibal, I couldn't, because he only submitted his work on Hulu's The Path. 2)I can't move things into other categories to suit my preference. I can't treat Horace and Pete like a limited series, even though that's clearly what it was, because the Academy let Louis C.K. submit it in the drama categories, and I can't take a largely dramatic half-hour like Transparent or Togetherness out of the comedy categories. 3)I don't consider shows and performances that I didn't watch much, if at all, this season. Based on the last time I was a regular viewer of Penny Dreadful and Orphan Black, for instance, I suspect Eva Green and Tatiana Maslany would both be incredibly strong contenders for the drama lead actress category, but I haven't seen a second of either show's eligible season. Back in the days before Peak TV, it would make me crazy when actors were obviously nominated based on their work from previous seasons, rather than anything they had done in the current year, so I'm not going to make any nominations based on similar assumptions. Also, because so much of the biggest action this year is in the limited series categories (even sans Horace and Pete), I'm going to make picks there, when usually I've stuck with the comedy and drama fields. So here we go... Outstanding Comedy Series black-ish (ABC) Master of None (Netflix) Review (Comedy Central) Transparent (Amazon) Veep (HBO) You're the Worst (FX) As I alluded to above, this was a tough one, especially since there are so many different kinds of "comedy" up for consideration. I could have surrounded Transparent and You're the Worst with a bunch of other half-hours that trended more towards the dramatic this year (say, Casual, Baskets, Togetherness, and Girls), or put on both of the CW's delightful Monday hour-long comedies in Jane the Virgin and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, or loaded up on the resurgent broadcast network comedy scene and paired black-ish with the likes of The Grinder, The Carmichael Show, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, and Fresh Off the Boat. And I haven't even mentioned Broad City or Lady Dynamite or Catastrophe or Silicon Valley or Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt or a bunch of others that I'm not happy to not have on my final list. But these six were ultimately the ones that stuck with me the most, in some cases very long after they first aired. Outstanding Drama Series The Americans (FX) Better Call Saul (AMC) Happy Valley (Netflix) Horace and Pete (LouisCK.net) The Leftovers (HBO) UnREAL (Lifetime) Because so many great shows like Fargo and American Crime and The People v. O.J. Simpson have gotten themselves categorized as limited series, this wasn't quite as impossible a category to cull down to six choices, even if I changed my mind five different times between including UnREAL, Mr. Robot, or Halt and Catch Fire for that last spot. The Leftovers was my favorite show of last year, and assuming its final season gets bumped to 2017, Horace and Pete and The Americans are the two front-runners to finish atop my best of list for this year. With Mad Men gone, and limited series more competitive, I'm holding out the faintest of hope that Americans can follow the Friday Night Lights pattern and start getting nominated late in its run after being largely ignored early on. Outstanding Limited Series American Crime (ABC) Fargo (FX) The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story (FX) Roots (History) Show Me a Hero (HBO) What an amazing resurgence for a format the rest of the TV business had all but ceded to HBO for the last decade. All six of these projects were extraordinary in different ways, and any one of them would be a more than deserving winner, though I'm assuming People v. O.J. is going to sweep its way through most of the limited series categories. Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series Anthony Anderson, black-ish Andrew Daly, Review Chris Geere, You're the Worst Rob Lowe, The Grinder Fred Savage, The Grinder Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent Some years, I set a rule that I will only nominate one actor per show, but I couldn't choose between the two Grinder leads, who were as perfect a crazy man/straight man pairing as TV has had in quite some time. Anderson and Geere did great work flipping back and forth between silliness and pathos this year (I still choke up thinking about Dre's Obama speech from the black-ish episode about how to talk to your kids about black people being shot by cops), Tambor was once again stunning in a largely dramatic performance (that is, again, eligible here, in a category that isn't Funniest Actor in a Comedy Series), and Daly's absolute commitment to the awfulness of Forrest MacNeil's life made the second Review season even funnier, and darker, than the first. Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series Steve Buscemi, Horace and Pete Louis C.K., Horace and Pete Rami Malek, Mr. Robot Bob Odenkirk, Better Call Saul Matthew Rhys, The Americans Justin Theroux, The Leftovers Horace and Pete was another case of my inability to choose between two actors from the same show, as by the end, C.K.'s work was just as nuanced and devastating as the more experienced Buscemi's. Malek was so riveting that he made a lot of pieces of Mr. Robot work that would have failed utterly in the hands of an even slightly less gifted performer, Theroux's work in the last few Leftovers season 2 episodes left me a wreck, Odenkirk continues to demonstrate surprising depths as a dramatic actor, and it's absurd that Matthew Rhys has yet to be nominated for all he does on Americans. Outstanding Lead Actor In A Limited Series Or Movie Bryan Cranston, All the Way James Franco, 11.22.63 Oscar Isaac, Show Me a Hero Regé-Jean Page, Roots Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story Patrick Wilson, Fargo Cranston and Franco both gave tremendous performances in ultimately flawed projects. Isaac somehow made all the exposition and policy wonkery of Show Me a Hero entertaining and tragic, Page and Vance were enormously charismatic as men who were flashy on the outside and deeply pained on the inside, and Patrick Wilson basically turned into Gary Cooper and became the powerful, still center around which all the craziness of Fargo season 2 could orbit. Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series Rachel Bloom, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Aya Cash, You're the Worst Gillian Jacobs, Love Ellie Kemper, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep Michaela Watkins, Casual Louis-Drefyus will — deservedly — keep winning this category until either Veep ends or she pulls a Candice Bergen and withdraws herself from consideration. So it almost doesn't matter who gets nominated alongside her. But the other performances I chose were all wonderfully nuanced and complicated as they painted very different portraits of women who are all damaged in some way, and any of them would make an incredibly deserving winner if Louis-Dreyfus were to pull a Larry David and somehow offend everyone in Los Angeles at the same time. Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series Shiri Appleby, UnREAL Kerry Bishé, Halt and Catch Fire Carrie Coon, The Leftovers Sarah Lancashire, Happy Valley Krysten Ritter, Jessica Jones Keri Russell, The Americans The Pov structure of Leftovers season 2 rendered everyone but Theroux a supporting player, but since Coon submitted herself here, I'm picking her, because when she was on screen, she was spectacular. Bishé was the highlight of the much-improved second season of Halt, Lancashire remains indelible on Happy Valley, Ritter lived up to all of my hopes for Jessica Jones, and refer to my Matthew Rhys comment when it comes to his TV spouse. The real surprise of the group is Appleby, who had never suggested the kind of depth and force that her role on UnREAL has allowed her to play. Outstanding Lead Actress In A Limited Series Or Movie Kirsten Dunst, Fargo Felicity Huffman, American Crime Riley Keough, The Girlfriend Experience Rachel McAdams, True Detective Sarah Paulson, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story Lili Taylor, American Crime As with the corresponding male category, we've got a couple of performances here (Keough and McAdams) that transcended iffy shows. You could argue that any or all of Dunst, Huffman, and Taylor belong in the supporting field, but they were all wonderful, even if they all understandably seem destined to lose to Paulson. Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Comedy Series Louie Anderson, Baskets Andre Braugher, Brooklyn Nine-Nine Jaime Camil, Jane the Virgin Christopher Meloni, Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp T.J. Miller, Silicon Valley Timothy Simons, Veep Honestly, I could make this an all-Veep category — say, with Simons, Tony Hale, Kevin Dunn, Gary Cole, Sam Richardson, and Matt Walsh (or swap any two of them out for Hugh Laurie and Reid Scott) — and it would be a completely respectable list. Instead, I decided to limit myself to one guy, and the New Hampshire election story has given Simons a chance to shine like never before. As for the others, Braugher is a national treasure, Camil may be playing the most reliable joke machine on television, Meloni stole First Day of Camp the same way he stole the original movie, and Miller got to add some surprising emotion to Erlich Bachman's usual hilarious buffoonery. And Anderson is, like Tambor, giving an almost entirely dramatic performance (and also playing a woman), but in a way that never feels like a gimmick. Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Drama Series Alan Alda, Horace and Pete Dylan Baker, The Americans Jonathan Banks, Better Call Saul Kevin Carroll, The Leftovers Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones Lance Reddick, Bosch Even if the Academy at large didn't watch Horace and Pete, I expect Alda will be nominated on name recognition alone, and when they see him give the performance of his career, he'll hopefully win. Baker sketched out a complicated and tragic character in the space of 13 episodes, Banks continued finding new gravitas inside Mike Ehrmantraut, Carroll knocked me out as much as his more well-known co-stars, Dinklage remains so much fun that he can even carry a long scene where he's acting against thin air disguised as CGI dragons, and Reddick also did the best work of his career on the largely unheralded Bosch. Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Limited Series Or Movie Sterling K. Brown, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story Ted Danson, Fargo Connor Jessup, American Crime Hugh Laurie, The Night Manager Zahn McClarnon, Fargo Bokeem Woodbine, Fargo Unfortunately, I assume John Travolta has one of these spots in the bag. And the only reason Jessup is here and not in the lead category is because he's young and relatively unknown. But this is still one of the most competitive groups in the whole field, and I'd love to see one of the more unheralded actors eligible win it, even though Danson and Laurie were both superb in the kinds of roles they don't usually play. Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series Loretta Devine, The Carmichael Show Kether Donohue, You're the Worst Allison Janney, Mom Kate McKinnon, Saturday Night Live Amanda Peet, Togetherness Kristen Schaal, Last Man on Earth Janney, like Louis-Dreyfus, may have a stranglehold on her category for a while, and she's terrific enough — at both the light and dark parts of Mom — that I can't get too annoyed with it. This is another extremely deep category, which I tried to cover with a variety of different kinds of performances from different kinds of shows. There's Devine playing extremely big — and yet still human enough to be at the center of an episode about clinical depression — on Carmichael (where David Alan Grier would also be a fine nominee on the male side), McKinnon carrying SNL, Donohue and Peet doing a mix of utter silliness and something much messier, and Schaal turning out in time to be the very best part of Last Man. I'd have liked to find room for some of the Transparent actresses or Zosia Mamet or a bunch of others, but you've gotta make choices when you play this game. Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Series Amy Brenneman, The Leftovers Ann Dowd, The Leftovers Regina King, The Leftovers Rhea Seehorn, Better Call Saul Alison Wright, The Americans Constance Zimmer, UnREAL Nope. Not gonna leave out one of the three Leftovers ladies here. (As a past winner, King is the most likely to get an actual nomination.) Seehorn, meanwhile, essentially became co-lead for much of Saul season 2, and was so likable and vulnerable and interesting that it felt like she was adding to Jimmy's story rather than taking away from it. Wright was stronger than ever on Americans, even though Martha was in crisis throughout, and Zimmer was every bit Shiri Appleby's dramatic equal as part of the UnREAL two-hander. Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Limited Series Or Movie Olivia Colman, The Night Manager Rachel Keller, Fargo Regina King, American Crime Cristin Milioti, Fargo Anika Noni Rose, Roots Jean Smart, Fargo Another category where I went with three from one show, reflecting both the great work of Keller, Milioti, and Smart, but also the relative shallowness of this particular field. King is one of several actors this year who, thanks to the proliferation of limited series and shows with shorter seasons, has a realistic shot at being nominated for two different performances. Colman had a bunch of great moments during The Night Manager (particularly the monologue about why her character was so interested in taking down Hugh Laurie), and Rose was one of the best parts of the outstanding Roots ensemble. What does everybody else think? What nominations are you most hoping to see? Alan Sepinwall may be reached at sepinwall@hitfix.com »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Emmy Awards: In Praise of Supporting Actors Who Stand Out From the Crowd

9 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Showtime recently announced its remake of “Twin Peaks” will include a cast of 217 actors. I pity whoever has to assemble that call sheet.

It’s hard enough these days for shows to stand out from the pack. Best of luck to the actors. The larger the cast, the harder it is for an actor to get any attention. And this year’s supporting actor and actress races are shaping up to be even more competitive than many of the lead races.

With A-list talent flocking to TV, the rise of the star-studded ensemble has certainly benefited TV fans, who get to see an incredible caliber of talent in choice roles. But what’s even more satisfying — and surprising — are the breakout performances from those names you might never have heard of before.

Take FX’s “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.” It’s one of the best-reviewed »

- Debra Birnbaum

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Broadcast Networks Re-Commit to Comedy in Hopes of Finding Next Big Hit

8 June 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

With a dozen network comedies cancelled this past season, it’s no secret that broadcast is struggling to find a big hit. But take one quick glance at the fall schedule, and this year’s secret is out: comedy is on trend.

While the past season delivered respectable performers in CBS’ “Life in Pieces” and NBC’s “Superstore,” plus a critical darling in The CW’s “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” no broadcast comedy has been a true smash since ABC’s “Modern Family” debuted in 2009.

And yet the networks are eager to find the next big thing as they recommit to the genre in a major way: ABC has slotted 10 half-hours on its fall schedule, CBS will return to four hours of sitcoms a week after going all drama on Mondays last season, NBC is bringing comedy back to Thursday, Fox continues taking big swings and The CW has added a third »

- Elizabeth Wagmeister

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The Best Series to Watch After a Breakup

6 June 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

There's no getting around it: Breakups are rough. But before you crawl into a cave and declare you'll never love again, check out these TV shows that demonstrate exactly how to, and how not to, deal with the loss of love before you rejoin the world. Your next partner will thank you.

'Man Seeking Woman' (2015 - )

Based on Simon Rich's novel "The Last Girlfriend on Earth," "Man Seeking Woman" is an absurd and terrifically filthy comedy about a man surviving a devastating breakup. Each episode takes one particular reality of single life to a wickedly funny extreme. In the pilot, Josh (Jay Baruchel) must deal with the fact that his ex-girlfriend has found a new boyfriend immediately -- and while everyone around him is encouraging Josh to be the better man and embrace her new beau, he's the only one concerned that the new boyfriend is literally »

- Jaime Vazquez

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TV Academy Unveils New Campus, Inducts Big Four into Hall of Fame at Star-Studded Gala

3 June 2016 10:24 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Television Academy held a star-studded gala Thursday night to unveil its redesigned North Hollywood campus and celebrate its 70th anniversary.

TV execs, stars and industry legends swarmed around the Academy’s new media center — named after Haim Saban and his wife, Cheryl — and then piled into the state-of-the-art Wolf Theatre — titled after Dick and Noelle Wolf — as TV Academy chairman and CEO Bruce Rosenblum broke the seal of its cutting-edge Dolby audio and visual systems with a highlight reel of memorable TV moments that drew applause and laughs from the audience.

“This is one of the most technologically advanced theaters in the world, and as a part of their sponsorship, Dolby will update the theater’s technology for the next 10 years, guaranteeing us the ultimate entertainment experience,” Rosenblum revealed.

The theater, which also boasts deep red, plush, comfortable seats, prompted Chelsea Handler to joke, “it’s almost as big as Ted Sarandos’ screening room. »

- Mannie Holmes

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Cheers: Stage Play Coming to Boston in September

27 May 2016 6:27 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Wouldn't you like to get away? Well, if you're going to Boston this September, you can see a stage adaptation of the classic sitcom Cheers, Boston.com reports.

Created by James Burrows, Les Charles, and Glen Charles, the NBC comedy ran from 1982 to 1993. The cast included Ted Danson, Shelley Long, Nicholas Colasanto, Rhea Perlman, John Ratzenberger, and Kelsey Grammer.

Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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TV Academy Announces Guests for Hall of Fame Cornerstone Award Ceremony

26 May 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Television Academy has announced additional guests for its 70th Anniversary gala, taking place on June 2.

Tim Allen, Carly Chaikin, Ted Danson, Portia Doubleday, Florence Henderson, Derek Hough, Felicity Huffman, Cloris Leachman, Phylicia Rashad, Marion Ross and Suzanne Somers are among the stars confirmed to attend the opening event for the new Saban Media Center at the Academy’s North Hollywood campus.

Previously announced guests include Jon Cryer, Chelsea Handler, Allison Janney, Regina King, Rami Malek, Garry Marshall and Bob Newhart.

The event will also feature a class photo to commemorate the new campus, which will gather television personalities representing many of TV’s memorable moments, renowned television legends responsible for the medium’s most iconic programming and the stars of today’s hottest series for a unique photographic tribute.

The gala will present the Hall of Fame Cornerstone Award to ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC in recognition of the networks’ historic vision, »

- Variety Staff

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