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1-20 of 83 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Wamg Interview: The Art Of Hammer Author Marcus Hearn

28 December 2010 6:11 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Titan Books has published Marcus Hearn’s third impressive hardback coffee table book on Hammer Horror and it’s a real dream not just for fans of the great British studio but for connoisseurs of the art of the movie poster. The team which produced “The Hammer Story” and “Hammer Glamor” has now come out with “The Art of Hammer“, a fantastic illustrated collection and history of Hammer film posters. Raquel Welch in her fur bikini against a backdrop of dinosaurs may be the most famous Hammer film poster (at least in the U.S.) but this book showcases over 300 posters from all over the world, all in color, pulled from private collections and the studio’s archives. Hearn has done a fantastic job assembling these sumptuous images. Some get the full-page treatment and some are accompanied by informative notes and trivia (the Danish Brides Of Dracula poster is the »

- Tom Stockman

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19 strangely Christmassy sci-fi and horror movies

23 December 2010 1:55 AM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Christmas has a hell of a PR agent. A good PR maximises the audience for their client, always looking for lateral markets beyond the core appeal of the product. So if Christmas is fundamentally about giving, goodwill and forgiveness, there's no harm - from a PR's point of view - if it can also be made to be about sex, death and loneliness too. We seem to have had our traditional - and always sad - fusillade of pre-Christmas celebrity deaths this year, and if we're lucky, the period between now and new year will bring no new and nasty surprises in that line.

In the meantime our TV screens have filled up customarily with ads for perfume and booze which remind us that Christmas is also a Pagan-style locus for celebrations of the carnal and sensory. And with campaigns targeted at those who have no invite to the celebrations »

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[Book Review] The Art of Hammer

13 December 2010 10:24 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

To quote The Art of Hammer introduction (which quotes the poster for the Hammer Films flick Creatures the World Forgot): “They don’t make them like this anymore.” Bloody, heaving boobs, wild-eyed vampires, lusty werewolves – nothing promises such lurid poster art like a Hammer Films collection.

Edited by Marcus Hearn, The Art of Hammer is a collection of rare Hammer Films posters from the golden age of the British studio’s output of glorious B (and sometimes C or D) horror flicks, creature features and quickie-noirs. The surprisingly brief introduction tells you just enough about the book’s intentions and the studio’s history to ground you, then steps aside and lets the posters tell their story.

And what a marvelous collection it is. For fans of schlocky old horror flicks, Hammer Studios is nothing short of legendary. They gave the world the Dracula movies with Christopher Lee as »

- Anthony Vieira

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Exclusive: Darren Aronofsky Talks Natalie Portman's "Terrors & Metamorphosis" In 'Black Swan'

2 December 2010 9:42 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Filmmaker Says Ballet Horror Was 10 Years In The Making; Is Glad His Old Boxing Project 'The Fighter' Is In Good Hands It's more than appropriate that when we sat down to chat with Darren Aronofsky, director of this week's flat-out brilliant ballet world thriller "Black Swan," we would do so under a giant framed photograph of Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Vincent Price, and John Carradine. The icons of horror seemed to be giving Aronofsky their blessing, and on the eve of his own super-spooky movie, seemed to be saying: "Welcome to the club." He's in good company. And "Black… »

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Five comics that deserve a movie

30 November 2010 1:53 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

I couldn’t have agreed more with Gabriel Ruzin’s recent article on the pillaging of superhero stories by Hollywood. While there have been some great comic book movies made in the last decade, there are some that were less than stellar, and some proposed movies that – while they may appease those of us that like more than just the mainstream heroes – don’t show much box office promise, due to a movie audience that isn’t familiar with lower-tier heroes.

While I would shell out the bucks for a Luke Cage/Iron Fist movie, not too many others would. And Hollywood has proven that they are willing to go outside of the superhero genre when it comes to comic book movies. And if they’re done right, we can avoid missteps like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. So if I may be so bold, here I offer a few funny »

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Five comics that deserve a movie

30 November 2010 1:53 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

I couldn’t have agreed more with Gabriel Ruzin’s recent article on the pillaging of superhero stories by Hollywood. While there have been some great comic book movies made in the last decade, there are some that were less than stellar, and some proposed movies that – while they may appease those of us that like more than just the mainstream heroes – don’t show much box office promise, due to a movie audience that isn’t familiar with lower-tier heroes.

While I would shell out the bucks for a Luke Cage/Iron Fist movie, not too many others would. And Hollywood has proven that they are willing to go outside of the superhero genre when it comes to comic book movies. And if they’re done right, we can avoid missteps like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. So if I may be so bold, here I offer a few funny »

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Five comics that deserve a movie

30 November 2010 1:53 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

I couldn’t have agreed more with Gabriel Ruzin’s recent article on the pillaging of superhero stories by Hollywood. While there have been some great comic book movies made in the last decade, there are some that were less than stellar, and some proposed movies that – while they may appease those of us that like more than just the mainstream heroes – don’t show much box office promise, due to a movie audience that isn’t familiar with lower-tier heroes.

While I would shell out the bucks for a Luke Cage/Iron Fist movie, not too many others would. And Hollywood has proven that they are willing to go outside of the superhero genre when it comes to comic book movies. And if they’re done right, we can avoid missteps like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. So if I may be so bold, here I offer a few funny »

Permalink | Report a problem


Five comics that deserve a movie

30 November 2010 1:53 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

I couldn’t have agreed more with Gabriel Ruzin’s recent article on the pillaging of superhero stories by Hollywood. While there have been some great comic book movies made in the last decade, there are some that were less than stellar, and some proposed movies that – while they may appease those of us that like more than just the mainstream heroes – don’t show much box office promise, due to a movie audience that isn’t familiar with lower-tier heroes.

While I would shell out the bucks for a Luke Cage/Iron Fist movie, not too many others would. And Hollywood has proven that they are willing to go outside of the superhero genre when it comes to comic book movies. And if they’re done right, we can avoid missteps like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. So if I may be so bold, here I offer a few funny »

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Ingrid Pitt 1937-2010

25 November 2010 10:29 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

As one YouTube user so eloquently puts it: “Ingrid Pitt, you can bite my neck with pleasure.” The Polish actress and star of films like The Vampire Lovers and Countess Dracula, died on 23 November, just two days after celebrating her 73rd birthday. Sadly, it turns out that all the fake blood she imbibed over the years didn’t make her immortal. Fortunately, her screen image was so indelible that she’ll live on in the hearts and minds of horror fans.

Fittingly, Pitt who was born Ingoushka Petrov, made her screen debut in the obscure 1964 Spanish film El sonido de la muerte, which was known in the Us as Sound of Horror. From the brief clip I’ve seen, it would appear that the budget only stretched as far as providing some very unconvincing dinosaur sound effects. Still, even horror queens have to start somewhere.

After uncredited appearances in Doctor Zhivago »

- Susannah

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The True Nature of Sacrifice – A Look Back At “The Wicker Man” – Part Two

25 November 2010 5:45 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

We continue our look back at the classic horror film The Wicker Man, to read the first part of this feature please click here.

And so to the late, great Edward Woodward himself, who inspires great confidence as Sergeant Howie, a man whose unfettered dogged persistence defies all who stand before him in his pursuit of answers.

A key scene in understanding Howie comes when, upon visiting the school house, he is shocked to discover the school mistress (played by Diane Cilento, a former Mrs. Sean Connery and widow of screenwriter Anthony Schaffer) teaching her young class the phallic importance of the maypole. Approaching an empty desk he assumes to belong to Rowan Morrison (the missing girl at the centre of the mystery) he is surprised to discover a small beetle tied to a piece of string running endless circles around a small nail with no apparent meaning or purpose. »

- Nick Turk

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Ingrid Pitt: a career in bitesize clips

24 November 2010 8:02 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Come in from the cold, stranger, and prepare yourself for the best and bloodiest work from Hammer horror's archetypal vampire countess. Let me take your scarf ...

Following Ingrid Pitt's death at 73, apparently from heart failure, her daughter Steffanie told the BBC the actor should be remembered as the vampire countess with the "wonderful teeth and the wonderful bosom". There seems little doubt Pitt will remain associated with the particular blend of gore and sex appeal that typified the Hammer movies of the early 1970s, and which remain her trademark.

Ingoushka Petrov was born in Poland in 1937 to a German father and Jewish mother. Confined to a concentration camp for much of the war, she later moved to Berlin where, in the 1950s, she married an American soldier. They moved to California but the marriage failed and she returned to Europe. In the 1960s, Pitt worked with the Berliner Ensemble theatre company under Helene Weigel, »

- Ben Walters

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Review: The Art of Hammer

19 November 2010 7:45 AM, PST | Corona's Coming Attractions | See recent Corona's Coming Attractions news »

If you're knowledgeable about your film history, a fan of classic horror movies or grew up a generation ago in the British Isles then you are familiar with the name of Hammer Films. While the company's origins lie in the 1930s, Hammer's film legacy truly began with its run of modestly budgeted gothic horror movies in the 1950s. Over the spread of the next three decades, the name of Hammer Films became synonymous with several actors like Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee who made their mark playing the doomed scientist or the prince of darkness, Count Dracula, respectively.

The Art of Hammer collects the movie poster artwork from Hammer's collection of films from the 1950s to the end of the 1970s. It was a time when British audiences ate up Hammer's high concept (but low budgeted) B-movies, films that offered frights, thrills and sometimes a glimpse of a young lass' bosum in her undergarments. »

- Patrick Sauriol

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Editorial: Sympathy for the Devils - Horror Characters I Felt Sorry For

19 November 2010 1:10 AM, PST | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

We’re a funny bunch, us horror fans. Of all the emotions we experience watching our beloved freak shows, sadness usually ain’t one of ‘em. It’s hard to want to hug someone when they’re spitting up stage blood all over your screen, but every so often genuine empathy can be aroused in our hardened hearts for certain cinematic victims. So, without getting too heavy about things, I’m in the strange mood to pay tribute to a few:

Characters I Genuinely Felt Sorry For

Freddy the Photographer – Dead & Buried

Oh, Freddy… I hope wherever you wound up that they’re taking good care of you. Freddy the Photographer visits the funky town of Potter’s Bluff and is almost immediately jumped by a gaggle of villagers and burned at a makeshift stake. Then they trash his car and stuff him in it, upside down. Then when the »

- Chris Haberman

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Book Review: The Art Of Hammer: Posters From The Archive Of Hammer Films

12 November 2010 3:15 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Dave Worrall

My first introduction to Hammer wasn’t seeing of one of their films (I wasn’t old enough), but looking at the wonderful posters that adorned the hoardings close to my home. The eye-catching posters – all painted by wonderfully skilled artists – with images of scantily-clad women and vampires and such-like monsters bursting forth were enough to both terrorize and tantalize the public. And that is exactly what they did. Audiences in their millions flocked to see these films during the Sixties and early Seventies, and it was the publicity material that was responsible in creating this horror phenomenon. The British quad poster for Hammer’s One Million Years B.C. is now an iconic image of the Sixties, and probably the most well-known film poster of all-time. It made millions for the studio and Raquel Welch became an overnight star. Hammer were the pioneers of film promotion - »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Five Essential... Hammer Horrors

6 November 2010 9:13 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Simon Moore selects his Five Essential Hammer Horrors...

There was a time when horror cinema wasn’t about jump shocks and buckets of red paint. When ‘horrifying’ an audience meant casting a deep, impending sense of dread over them; a feeling certain to stay with them long after the theatre lights came up and they left to go home.

In the 1950s and 60s, Hammer Film Productions created some of the most adventurous, shocking, atmospheric and, of course, horrifying films ever seen. The ‘70s saw more visceral and realistic horror like The Shining and The Exorcist, but nobody since the late ‘60s has come close to Hammer’s glorious embrace of the gothic.

These films are about a heightened sense of reality; where worlds very like our own come face to face with disaster and death – and like our world, the heroes rarely win. They might vanquish the evil presence – be it vampires, »

- flickeringmyth

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November DVD Playhouse

5 November 2010 7:15 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

DVD Playhouse—November 2010

By Allen Gardner

Paths Of Glory (Criterion) Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 antiwar classic put him on the map as a major filmmaker. Kirk Douglas stars in a true story about a French officer in Ww I who locks horns with the military’s top brass after his men are court-martialed for failing to carry out an obvious suicide mission. A perfect film, across the board, with fine support from George Macready as one of the most despicable martinet’s ever captured on film, Ralph Meeker, and Adolphe Menjou, all oily charm as a conniving General. Also available on Blu-ray disc. Bonuses: Audio commentary by critic Gary Giddins; Excerpt from 1966 audio interview with Kubrick; 1979 interview with Douglas; New interviews with Jan Harlan, Christiane Kubrick, and producer James B. Harris; French television documentary on real-life case which inspired the film; Trailer. Widescreen. Dolby 1.0 mono.

Winter’S Bone (Lionsgate) After her deadbeat father disappears, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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In-Depth Video Look Into the Hammer Films Revival

5 November 2010 6:06 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

For nearly half of the previous century, Hammer Films productions was one of the most well known movies for science fiction, thrillers, film noirs and comedies. Many Hammer’s films featured well known actors like Ralph Bates, Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. With its recent release of “Let Me in,” Hammer Films is currently in production of “The Woman in Black” with actor Daniel Radcliffe and plans to possibly revive its horror classics like “Quatermass” and “Dracula.” Check out the following news video from the United Kingdom about Hammer Films and a behind the scenes look of “The Woman in Black.” Gig Patta’s Take: I’ve seen a few of Hammer’s films including “Dracula,” “The Mummy,” and even “The Gorgon.” They weren’t too bad, especially for films made about 50 years ago. Remakes and updates to these Hammer Films are probably not a bad idea to introduce the movies to a new generation. »

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Take Three: David Warner

2 November 2010 8:28 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Craig here with Take Three.

Today: David Warner

Heads, brains and faces, skewed or distorted, are the prominent concerns with today’s Take Three supporting actor David Warner: the lopping off, the removal of, and the obsessively creepy staring, respectively, are what it's all about. In The OmenFrom Beyond the Grave and The Man with Two Brains Warner thrilled us in a delightful and devious manner. He's an ideal actor for Halloween season.

Take One: I'm starting with the Man in the Mirror

Double-dealing, in particular, was the name of the game in ‘The Gate Crasher’, the first segment of Kevin Connor’s 1973 Amicus portmanteau film From Beyond the Grave. Warner was Edward Charlton, who surely lived to regret the snagging of an ancient, dubiously prescient mirror from shopkeeper Peter Cushing at a cut-price cost. Warner plays Charlton as cocky and belligerent one minute, and fearfully seized up the next. »

- Craig Bloomfield

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The Art of Hammer Book Review

2 November 2010 7:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Marcus Hearn has assembled an impressive collection of poster art for his latest book on Hammer and with Let Me In heralding Hammer’s return to the cinemas this week it seems like the appropriate time to cast an eye over the gaudy and wonderful history of the illustrious studio.

For those who associate Hammer with the twin towers of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee will be pleased to see various posters from the more popular classic Hammer horrors here with Hearn wisely including Draculas and Frankenstein galore, both UK and international posters.

Hammer’s foray into comedy and sci-fi is not overlooked and it’s a fascinating document of a studio who came to define a genre so completely that its name is intrinsically linked with it and the advertising of the film, awash with cleavage and carnage in equal measure, reflect not only the taste of the audience »

- Jon Lyus

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Why John Carpenter’s Halloween Almost Didn’t Happen

30 October 2010 4:58 AM, PDT | Horrorbid | See recent Horrorbid news »

In honor of tomorrows big day we revisit one of our most requested articles. Gotta love us some original 1978 Halloween. When we think about horror in a general sense the film Halloween almost always comes to mind and not just because it shares its title with our favorite holiday. But what led to the movie’s success? What if they never used the converted the Don Post Captain Kirk Mask? Would it still have been a hit and would it still have had the impact it made?

Remember Halloween in 1978, the little indy film shot by kids basically? It was pretty much the Paranormal Activity of its day as far as box office numbers are concerned (content and lasting impact are another matter). It’s an incredible feat that most low budget movies only dream of accomplishing. Still, one has to wonder how they pulled it off. Why the success? »

- Keepers of the Bid

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