IMDb > Peter Cushing > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 1997

1-20 of 95 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


5 reasons to visit London's Sherlock Holmes exhibition

17 October 2014 1:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Between the long-awaited confirmation of Sherlock's fourth series, the even longer-awaited confirmation of Sherlock Holmes 3, and the upcoming release of Anthony Horowitz's novel Moriarty, the cult of Holmes is positively thriving.

It's no secret that we're big Baker Street fans here at Digital Spy, so we were predisposed to enjoy the Museum of London's new exhibition Sherlock Holmes: The Man Who Never Lived and Will Never Die.

Incorporating video footage, paintings, written extracts, props from the BBC's Sherlock and some artifacts belonging to Arthur Conan Doyle himself, there are too many Holmesian treasures to name within the multimedia exhibition. But below are the five main reasons it's a must-do for any fan.

1. See the birth of Sherlock Holmes

On paper, that is. One of the rarest and most impressive items in the exhibition is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's notebook, which contains the first lines of »

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Curse of The Werewolf’ nails the FX, misses on content

16 October 2014 7:45 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Curse of the Werewolf

Directed by Terence Fisher

Written by Anthony Hinds

UK, 1961

The original Universal Studios Wolf Man left an indelible mark on film history, particularly in it’s painstakingly specific make-up transformation that turned Lon Chaney, Jr.’s Larry Talbot into the title character. That effect has hung over every werewolf feature since, with films trying to compete with makeup maestro Jack Pierce’s legendary design. 20 years after the first Wolf Man film, Hammer Horror took a stab at the monster, utilizing a script based on A Werewolf in Paris and a barrel-chested Oliver Reed in his first film role.

By the time Hammer got around to making their werewolf film they’d already found success with multiple Peter Cushing/Christopher Lee vehicles such as The Mummy, Dracula and Frankenstein, all of which displayed exciting makeup effects, and they continued the trend early on in The Curse of the Werewolf. »

- Jae K. Renfrow

Permalink | Report a problem


The Star Wars Emperor's First Name Leaked

15 October 2014 9:10 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

It’s been 37 years since he was first mentioned in Star Wars-Episode 4: A New Hope, and the main villain of the Star Wars universe has not been given a full name. An upcoming novel finally gives the infamous villain a full moniker.

 

[Editor's Update: I received an advanced copy of this book a few weeks ago and saw this name, however Nda's prevented us from releasing this news previously, and it wasn't until Nycc and a jerk online decided to leak it, that it's become public knowledge. ]

He’s been called by many names; The Emperor, Darth Sidious, Senator Palpatine and Emperor Palpatine. But through it all, he’s had no first name. Not in any of the films, nor any of the other canonical multi-media adventures in the Star Wars Universe.  That’s finally changed.

A name has been given to the sinister Sith in the upcoming, canonical book “Tarkin," written by author James Luceno. (Evidently Grand Moff Tarkin, who was portrayed by Hammer Films horror movie legend Peter Cushing, is getting some love.) This news was revealed at NY Comic-con.

So, what is Palpatine’s first name? It’s Sheev! Sheev Plapatine. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


Does the Emperor Finally have a First Name?

15 October 2014 9:10 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 

It’s been 37 years since he was first mentioned in Star Wars-Episode 4: A New Hope, and the main villain of the Star Wars universe has not been given a full name. An upcoming novel finally gives the infamous villain a full moniker.

 

 

He’s been called by many names; The Emperor, Darth Sidious, Senator Palpatine and Emperor Palpatine. But through it all, he’s had no first name. Not in any of the films, nor any of the other canonical multi-media adventures in the Star Wars Universe.  That’s finally changed.

 

According to the fan site Star Wars: Underworld, a name has been given to the sinister Sith in the upcoming, canonical book “Tarkin," written by author James Luceno. (Evidently Grand Moff Tarkin, who was portrayed by Hammer Films horror movie legend Peter Cushing, is getting some love.) This news was revealed at NY Comic-con.

 

So, what is Palpatine’s first name? »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


From Vampires to Cave Girls: The History of Hammer Films

13 October 2014 9:01 PM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

That a little studio located in the English countryside consistently put out high quality films on a very limited budget is one of the great stories in filmmaking history. Hammer Films was the most successful independent film company ever, producing comedy, drama, mysteries, and war movies before finding their niche in horror. Hammer became a name synonymous with horror, a name that still means something today.

They took their horror stories from English literature set in Europe in the 19th century and their carefully designed and constructed sets created an atmosphere that made the time and place as much a part of the film as the story. After securing remake rights from Universal for their catalog of classics from the 1930s and 1940s, Hammer became the leading producer of horror films. Hammer’s philosophy was straightforward: always be entertaining, have plenty of sex appeal, and lots of violence and blood. »

- Gregory Small

Permalink | Report a problem


Looking back at The Avengers

13 October 2014 10:13 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Alex pays a fond return revisit to 1960s classic TV series, The Avengers...

Stylish crime fighting, despicable evil masterminds, a bowler-hatted old Etonian gentleman spy and a series of beautiful leather cat-suited, kinky-booted, no-nonsense heroines. The Avengers had all this and more. What began as a monochrome tape series in January 1961 ran the whole of the Sixties, becoming a colourful slice of period hokum, full of flair, wit and sophistication, yet with its tongue firmly in its cheek.

Always the perfect gentleman, John Steed was played by Patrick Macnee. Originally billed second to the late Ian Hendry, Macnee was still playing Steed over 15 years later when he was teamed with the youthful duo of Joanna Lumley and Gareth Hunt for The New Avengers in 1976. In the 1998 film, the role of Steed was given to Ralph Fiennes and Uma Thurman played Emma Peel. I will say no more about the film. »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem


Hammer Horror Thursdays: ‘The Gorgon’ a memorable and unique member of the Hammer canon

9 October 2014 11:32 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Gorgon

Written by John Gilling

Directed by Terence Fisher

UK, 1964

In the 1950’s, at the birth of the atom age, the content of horror films shifted from the supernatural horrors like Dracula and the Wolf Man, to science-based atrocities. Frankenstein’s monster, which was a patchwork of body parts given life by the mysterious power of lightning, became the Colossus of New York, a giant robot with the brain of a brilliant scientist who goes mad. The gypsy curse that turned Lon Chaney Jr.’s Larry Talbot into a Wolf Man becomes a medical experiment that transforms Michael Landon’s Tony Rivers into a Teenaged Werewolf. The monsters were no longer mythological creatures but scientifically created horrors to reflect the place science had taken in our lives.

When Hammer Horror came into prominence at the end of the 50’s and early 60’s it did so because of its penchant for gore and sexuality. »

- Jae K. Renfrow

Permalink | Report a problem


Is Disney Reissuing Original 'Star Wars' Movies on Digital?

8 October 2014 9:59 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

When Disney bought LucasFilm for $4 billion nearly two years ago, that allowed Disney to develop Star Wars: Episode VII and the sequels and spin-offs that will follow it, but the original Star Wars trilogy that started it all is still owned by 20th Century Fox. There are many fans who are hoping that Disney's LucasFilm purchase would lead the studio to re-release the original, non-Special Edition versions of Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back and Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi. If a new ad for an Italian Disney website is to be believed, that may be happening.

FilmDivider came across an ad for Disney.it that boasts fans can watch content from Disney films on their laptops and mobile devices, which includes footage from Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Lost Sherlock Holmes Film Re-Discovered

6 October 2014 2:56 AM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Of the well-over-200 Sherlock Holmes films produced since 1900, one you might not have expected to see was 1916's Sherlock Holmes. Before Benedict Cumberbatch, Robert Downey Jr, Ian McKellen and Jonny Lee Miller; before Jeremy Brett and Peter Cushing; before even Basil Rathbone, there was William Gillette, in the blockbuster 1899 stage play Sherlock Holmes: A Drama In Four Acts. Long thought to have been lost forever, a nitrate copy of the film adaptation has just been uncovered in the vaults of the French film archive the Cinémathèque Français.Gillette toured the world with the play and became indelibly linked to the famous Baker Street detective. It was Gillette that popularised the deerstalker hat and the big pipe (though he in turn got them from Strand magazine illustrator Sidney Paget); coined the phrase "Elementary, my dear Watson"; and was the recipient of the famous telegram from a bored-of-Holmes Arthur Conan Doyle telling him that he could, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Long Before Downey Jr. There Was Gillette: Lost Holmes Movie Has Been Unearthed

2 October 2014 7:02 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Sherlock Holmes' movie found at Cinémathèque Française (image: William Gillette in 'Sherlock Holmes') Sherlock Holmes, a long-thought-lost 1916 feature starring stage performer and playwright William Gillette in the title role, has been discovered in the vaults of the Cinémathèque Française. Directed by the all-but-forgotten Arthur Berthelet for the Chicago-based Essanay production company, the approximately 90-minute movie is supposed to be not only the sole record of William Gillette's celebrated performance as Arthur Conan Doyle's detective, but also the only surviving Gillette film.* In the late 19th century, William Gillette himself wrote the play Sherlock Holmes, which turned out to be a mash-up of various stories and novels featuring the detective, chiefly the short stories "A Scandal in Bohemia" and "The Final Problem." ("May I marry Holmes?" Gillette, while vying for the role, telegraphed Conan Doyle. The latter replied, "You may marry or murder or do What you like with him. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Dracula Untold, Dracula undying, Dracula overdone?

2 October 2014 6:20 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Dracula Untold bites the UK box office this week, but are we reaching vampire overload, James wonders...

Drac is back (in, erm, black, but we're not going to crank AC/DC because it's cliché, it's anachronistic in this medieval setting and it might be mistaken as a reference to Iron Man). If you go to your local cinema this weekend you can see Dracula Untold which has Luke Evans vamping it up as the latest incarnation of the most infamous bloodsucker in cultural history.

Once the movie has been seen the title should be changed to 'Dracula Told' because then it won't be a story 'Untold' but, ah, I digress. The important thing to know is that audiences are going to get to enjoy a new movie expanding the Dracula mythos and this one has a lot to offer cinemagoers getting into the horror mindset in the Halloween month.

We're »

- ryanlambie

Permalink | Report a problem


Ten Best: Unforgettable Dracula Performances

1 October 2014 6:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Horror cinema has a long tradition of creating iconic characters and none more so than those borne in the early days of the genre: characters such as Frankenstein’s monster, the Mummy, the Creature from the Black Lagoon and, of course, Dracula – the king of horror. A character who, despite his many cinematic deaths, always returns to the silver screen for one more bite of flesh… As he does this week in Dracula Untold, which features Luke Evans as the evil Vlad Tepes.

With that in mind we thought we’d rundown the ten best unforgettable Dracula performances in cinema. Check them out below and let us know in the comments if you agree or disagree!

Christopher LeeDracula (1958)

Dracula (1958) is the first in the series of Hammer Horror films. Directed by Terence Fisher, Dracula (1958) stars Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, Melissa Stribling, Carol Marsh and Michael Gough. Retitled Horror of Dracula »

- Phil Wheat

Permalink | Report a problem


‘It’s Alive! It’s Alive!’ Why Hollywood Keeps Trying To Spark Life Into Frankenfilms

27 September 2014 6:12 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Filmmakers have been obsessed with Frankenstein since James Whale brought Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel to life and instantly gave birth to an iconic monster franchise that remains a major priority for Universal. It’s one of the most important public domain properties in fiction, but reanimating the Green Guy into a worthy anti-hero isn’t easy. Everyone from Kenneth Branagh, Robert De Niro and Aaron Eckhart have discovered you need more than neck bolts to spark a good movie. The futility hasn’t stopped Candyman and Immortal Beloved director Bernard Rose, who’s returning to horror filmmaking with his own modern take on the Frankenstein legend. He shot his in downtown Los Angeles, with Xavier Samuel, Carrie-Anne Moss, Danny Huston, and Tony Todd starring in a Frankenfilm set against the backdrop of the contemporary 3D bio-printing revolution. “They’re already 3D-printing organs, so to actually print an entire human being »

- Jen Yamato

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Twins of Evil’ & ‘Countess Dracula’ Blu-ray Review

16 September 2014 9:29 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Hammer have had something of a renaissance on Blu-ray recently, with StudioCanal releasing a number of classic titles in new hi-def editions. And now, released as part of Network’s ‘The British Film’ collection, comes two of Hammer’s “sexier” films of the 70s: the infamous Twins of Evil, starring Playboy Playmates Mary and Madeleine Collinson; and Countess Dracula, which features a career-defining performance from Ingrid Pitt in the titular role.

Despite being made during Hammer early-70s fallow period, where the studio was running out of stories, out of budget and were being left behind by more “extreme” horror films and exploitation movies emanating from the Us (after all this was just after the release of Night of the Living Dead which ultimately changed the face of the genre forever), both Twins of Evil and Countess Dracula are beloved by fans of the studio, and with good reason.

Twins of Evil

Stars: Peter Cushing, »

- Phil Wheat

Permalink | Report a problem


'Star Wars' Uncut Cantina Scene Reveals Never-Before-Seen Footage

5 September 2014 5:08 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

With Star Wars: Episode VII currently in production, fans will have to wait another year and three months to see this highly-anticipated sequel in theaters. However, if you're craving some new footage from a galaxy far, far away, then you're in luck. Trailer Addict has posted what they call the "official unedited Cantina scene" from Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope that featured never-before-seen footage, including Han Solo (Harrison Ford) getting close with a female companion before meeting Luke (Mark Hamill) and Obi-Wan (Alec Guinness).

However, the footage is rather raw, with some bits of sound missing, including the infamous Cantina Band tune, along with sound effects, and the footage has not been color corrected. Still, it's well worth watching to see some of the creatures in the Cantina that weren't in the final cut, along with alternate dialogue in the Han/Greedo confrontation and Han praising Obi-Wan's handiwork with the light saber. »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


The Beast Must Die

2 September 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Here's another installment featuring Joe Dante's reviews from his stint as a critic for Film Bulletin circa 1969-1974. Our thanks to Video Watchdog and Tim Lucas for his editorial embellishments!  

Which one is the werewolf? Finding the answer makes a neat gimmick, smart promotion of which should make this otherwise tame British import a strong contender in ballyhoo markets. Rating: PG.

This British horror mystery has a good audience‑participation gimmick going for it: a "Werewolf Break," during which the story stops to allow viewers to shout out the name of whichever suspicious character they think is the werewolf that's been wiping out other cast members. Reminiscent of the sort of surefire gimmickry that William Castle specialized in during the early '60s, this bit is being shrewdly promoted by the always showmanship‑minded Cinerama Releasing, and should boost The Beast Must Die to good grosses in fast saturation playoff. »

- Joe Dante

Permalink | Report a problem


Den of Geek Book Club: Lord Of Misrule

29 August 2014 3:52 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Aliya reads Christopher Lee's autobiography Lord Of Misrule, and finds a witty book full of anecdotes and a surprising amount of golf...

Christopher Lee holds the world record for the most amount of on-screen swordfights, having wielded a variety of swords, billiard cues, and lightsabers in 17 films. And that’s a small percentage of his body of work, with over 250 performances in some of the biggest, smallest and weirdest films you could hope to watch. I don’t know how he found time to write this autobiography back in 1977. And I also don’t understand how so much of that autobiography could be about golf.

How does he find time to play so much golf? And how does he make it sound so interesting? Maybe it’s the people he plays with: a mixture of stars, professionals, statesmen and politicians grace the pages, all of them deserving an anecdote or two. »

- ryanlambie

Permalink | Report a problem


10 More What Ifs About Doctor Who

28 August 2014 10:14 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

BBC

Last week, we talked about various ways in which Doctor Who could have turned out very differently than it did – either because an actor stayed on longer than he did, or a pilot went to series, or things simply worked out in other ways. We covered some of the eternal burning questions, such as what would have happened if the Daleks had gotten their own series, or what would have happened if Sarah Jane Smith had gotten her own series far, far earlier than she did. For the most part, our answers were purely speculative – no one really knows what would have happened if, say, Hartnell had been forced out of the series earlier than he was by his bosses. But in a few cases, we know what could have been, and it makes some of us tear our hair out. Or maybe that’s just us…

That list was by no means exhaustive, »

- Tony Whitt

Permalink | Report a problem


The House that Dripped Blood

26 August 2014 12:50 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Here's another installment featuring Joe Dante's reviews from his stint as a critic for Film Bulletin circa 1969-1974. Our thanks to Video Watchdog and Tim Lucas for his editorial embellishments!  

Four horror tales centering on haunted house. Well made and acted, an exploitable entry for general dualler markets, but rather mild for more bloodthirsty horror audience. Could have had class potential except for the title. Ok boxoffice future overall. Rating: Gp.

Its sanguine title notwithstanding, The House That Dripped Blood aims at quiet chills rather than boisterous thrills, taking the form of four horror stories of varying quality centering on an accursed country house. Production, direction and acting are of a high standard, although the stories written by Psycho's Robert Bloch lack the sensational aspects to wholly satisfy the present blood‑and‑guts horror market. In fact, were it not for the title, this could be a fairly »

- Joe Dante

Permalink | Report a problem


Doctor Who's Peter Capaldi on Daleks return: 'I swore with glee'

22 August 2014 3:08 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Doctor Who's Peter Capaldi has promised that series eight will be markedly "different" from previous years.

Capaldi takes over the role of the Time Lord in this weekend's feature-length episode 'Deep Breath', which sees Jenna Coleman back as companion Clara Oswald.

Doctor Who's Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman crash Tardis in Parliament Square

Moffat on Doctor Who title sequence: 'I'm proud of creative response'

Speaking to the New York Daily News, Capaldi and Coleman acknowledged that the dynamic between The Doctor and Clara will be far less playful than during his predecessor Matt Smith's era.

"He saves the world, and he's full of joy and enthusiasm and curiosity in all the same ways, but he doesn't have the patience anymore, and he's unapologetic," Coleman explained.

Capaldi said: "They sort of hurt each other in a way I haven't seen them do before and they can't understand why. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 1997

1-20 of 95 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners