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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999

6 items from 2014


Blu-ray, DVD Release: Hallucination Strip

11 April 2014 1:53 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: April 29, 2014

Price: DVD $19.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Raro Video/Kino

Italian filmmaker Lucio Marcaccini’s only film, the 1975 movie Hallucination Strip is a psychedelic crime flick with a social commentary.

Bud Cort (Harold & Maude), in his debut performance, plays Massimo Monaldi, a student involved in political protests and juvenile delinquency. When Massimo steals a valuable tobacco box, he quickly becomes tangled in a dangerous web between the police and the mafia.

Culminating in an extended and elaborately choreographed party sequence, underscored with a trippy soundtrack by Albert Verrecchia, Hallucination Strip excels with it’s not-so-subtle mix of sex, drugs, religion, politics and corruption.

Presented in Italian with English subtitles, the Blu-ray and DVD contain the following bonus features:

-New HD transfer form original 35mm negative

-New and improved English subtitle translation

-Fully illustrated booklet by Nocturno Cinema

-Video interview with the editor Giulio Berruti

-Original Italian theatrical trailer »

- Laurence

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Pumping Iron and the birth of the 80s action hero

18 March 2014 6:59 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Ryan Lambie 19 Mar 2014 - 06:21

The 1977 docu-drama Pumping Iron launched Schwarzenegger's career, and led to an era of fitness obsession and action heroes, Ryan writes...

In February 1976, the Whitney Museum in New York played host to a highly unusual exhibit: Arnold Schwarzenegger, clad in little more than a tiny pair of brown briefs, posing like a Greek statue on a rotating platform. Around him, some of the Manhattan art scene's most famous critics sat and pontificated.

Called Articulate Muscle: The Male Body In Art, the exhibition included two fellow Mr Universe bodybuilders, Frank Zane and Ed Corney, plus a panel of artists and historians, who discussed the notion of "the body itself as an art medium". The event was inspired and organised by Charles Gaines, a former weight lifter and author of the book Pumping Iron, a candid and in-depth account of bodybuilding with photographs by George Butler.

Originally expected to attract around 300 visitors, »

- ryanlambie

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Tenacious Eats Presents “Westrospective” – Wes Anderson Month at ‘Movies for Foodies’

20 February 2014 9:07 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Director Wes Anderson’s newest The Grand Budapest Hotel, opens March 21st. The trailers trot out the usual Anderson calling cards: dry humor, beautiful shots, a killer soundtrack, and of course, Bill Murray Jason Schwartzman, and Owen Wilson. So much seems borrowed from Anderson’s earlier films that he might as well be following a checklist but though the director has consistently divided audiences, his films have always won over his many loyal supporters.

The chefs at Tenacious Eats are big fans of Wes Anderson and they have christened the month of March “Westrospective – Wes Anderson Month” as part of their film series Movies for Foodies. This is a one-of-a-kind event where food is prepared and plated in front of you while you watch a film on the big screen. Tenacious Eats only works with locally produced food procured by them and hard-to-find ingredients imported from places that specialize in them. »

- Tom Stockman

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Blu-ray Release: The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

19 February 2014 7:24 AM, PST | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray Release Date: May 27, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Bill  Murray (Lost in Translation) stars in Wes Anderson’s (Moonrise Kingdom) quirky 2004 comedy adventure The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, which makes it’s Blu-ray debut on the venerable Criterion label.

Internationally famous oceanographer Steve Zissou (Murray) and his crew—Team Zissou—set sail on an expedition to hunt down the mysterious, elusive, possibly nonexistent Jaguar Shark that killed Zissou’s partner during the documentary filming of their latest adventure. They are joined on their voyage by a young airline copilot (Owen Wilson, Hall Pass), a pregnant journalist (Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine), and Zissou’s estranged wife, Eleanor (Anjelica Huston, Crimes and Misdemeanors).

The all-star ensemble of Steve Zissou also includes Willem Dafoe (Platoon), Jeff Goldblum (Morning Glory) and Bud Cort (Harold and Maude).

Criterion issued Steve Zissou on DVD in 2005 and has ported over that edition’s bonus features for the Blu-ray edition. »

- Laurence

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Altman’s Unsung ’70s

20 January 2014 1:50 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Director Robert Altman had his fair share of ups and downs. The oscillation between works widely lauded and those typically forgotten is prevalent throughout his exceptionally diverse career. This was — and still is — certainly the case with his 1970s output. This decade of remarkable work saw the release of now established classics like M*A*S*H, Nashville, and McCabe & Mrs. Miller, as well as a picture like 3 Women, which would gradually gain a cult following of sorts and subsequently be regarded as a quality movie despite its initial dismissal. But couched between and around these features are more electric and generally more unorthodox films. There are multiple titles from this, arguably Altman’s most creative of decades, that remain generally unheralded to all but his most ardent of admirers.

For Altman, the 1970s began with this disparity. The first year of the decade saw the release of M*A*S*H, »

- Jeremy Carr

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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 40-31

19 January 2014 9:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Welcome back to the Definitive List, where for the inaugural top 50, we’re counting down the best romantic comedies. The majority of numbers 50 through 41 weren’t so traditional. A secret-admirer movie, a period piece, a “These two don’t make sense together” movie, and a French fantasy among them, but we still managed to squeak in a Wes Anderson movie and a surrealist masterpiece. It doesn’t get any more traditional from here, as numbers 40 through 31 jumps around just as much, from sub-genre to sub-genre. Regardless, these films have made their mark on the industry and still hold a place in the pantheon of the rom-com hall of fame.

#40. Groundhog Day (1993)

Bill Murray was nominated for an Oscar after his dramatic turn in Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation. He has shown great promise in Wes Anderson’s films. But his best performance to date came in this Harold Ramis »

- Joshua Gaul

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999

6 items from 2014


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