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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 212 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Bob Palmer, Longtime Publicist, Dies at 85

18 September 2014 8:36 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Bob Palmer — who, through a 60-year career as a publicist, represented clients including Anthony Hopkins and Dick Van Dyke as well as some of the most popular TV shows of the 1960s and 70s — died Monday at his home in Pacific Palisades of natural causes. He was 85.

After working for ABC and several major studios, Palmer started his own firm in 1979, representing Hopkins, Van Dyke, Faye Dunaway, Sada Thompson, David Soul, Peter Strauss, Michele Lee and Larry Schiller Prods., the latter of which produced the TV movie “The Executioner’s Song.” Palmer for a time represented Hopkins as a manager, and created the 1992 Academy Award campaign for Hopkins’ performance in “The Silence of the Lambs,” for which he won the Oscar for best actor.

In an interview, Hopkins said he first met Palmer while doing a publicity junket in 1973 at the Century Plaza Hotel, and afterward they became “very good friends. »

- Ted Johnson

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Composer Brian Reitzell Explains His Psychotic Music for NBC’s Hannibal

11 September 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

The score for NBC’s Hannibal might be the closest someone’s come on TV to soundtracking the experience of losing one’s marbles. That someone is Brian Reitzell, who’s composed and supervised soundtracks for Sofia Coppola, Rian Johnson, and Peter Berg. Reitzell released a solo album, Auto Music, earlier this summer and now has the original score for Hannibal’s first two seasons. Reitzell got on the phone with Vulture to discuss creating a “constant heightened state of reality,” preparing a Hannibal concert, and how bad commercials suck. [This conversation is spoiler-free.]Congratulations on the soundtrack album. Is that somewhat rare for TV scores?I've done two TV shows [Ed. note: Starz’s Boss is the other] and they both had CD and vinyl releases. I know there’s probably lots of compilations like Grey’s Anatomy pop songs or things of that nature, but I think Hannibal is a very different — sonically, it’s quite different. It’s »

- Zach Dionne

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Review: Kate Winslet can't stop 'A Little Chaos' from living up to its title

11 September 2014 1:07 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Toronto — “Titanic” was a seminal moment in Kate Winslet’s career, but she made it clear even during the film's Oscar run and in the years following that it was a more grueling experience than she ever expected. In the years since she’s avoided anything that came close to those shooting conditions, when she spent weeks in water tanks and wading through water. That is until her new period drama, “A Little Chaos,” which screened for the press at the 2014 Toronto Film Festival Wednesday before its Saturday night premiere. In the film, Winslet and her stunt person are drenched when her character tries to manually close an aqueduct from flooding a massive garden she’s been building at Versailles (yes, that Versailles). The long and the short of it is that the sequence found Winslet in a ton of water. And for her to do that, she must simply adore her co-star and director, »

- Gregory Ellwood

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Inside the Emmy Parties: Kerry Washington & ‘Scandal’ Cast Party Hop, Cloris Leachman Photobombs

24 August 2014 10:08 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Emmy Awards aren’t till Monday, Aug. 25, but the celebrations start early. Variety will be on hand inside the best parties around Hollywood as the stars mingle, nibble and toast to TV’s finest. Here’s our party report for Saturday, Aug. 23:

11:10 a.m. “Nashville’s” Rayna James is “a woman that we need to see in country music,” says honoree Callie Khouri at the Women Making History Event, presented by the National Women’s History Museum and Glamour Magazine, at the Skirball Center. (She also teases that the “Nashville” premiere is going to feature two live performances in the show.) She thinks it’s incredible to see more women directing TV and as showrunners. “Nashville” boasts a largely female writing staff and women in main storylines.

11:36 a.m. Sophia Bush, also being honored, stops to blush when her mom stands behind the press snapping photos »

- Cynthia Littleton, Laura Prudom and Shalini Dore

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Scarlett Johansson's 5 best roles: Under the Skin, The Avengers

23 August 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

2014 has turned out to be a landmark year for Scarlett Johansson. The double whammy of Spike Jonze's Her and Jonathan Glazer's Under the Skin saw her doing the best work of her career, in both cases playing a non-human being who develops consciousness and a soul through her contact with the world.

Then there was her fourth and best outing yet as Marvel's Black Widow. Her role in The Winter Soldier was so significant that the film could justifiably have been called Captain America & Black Widow, if not for the fact that that's a rubbish title.

And to cap things off this summer, Johansson's solo sci-fi Lucy debuted at number one at the Us box office, far outstripping the week's other major release Hercules.

With Lucy reaching UK screens this week, Digital Spy looks back on Johansson's five best roles to date.

Ghost World (2001)

While the role of »

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Wait Till They Get a Load of Me: 1989 – The Year That Changed Hollywood

11 August 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

“Twenty five years. Makes a girl think.” So said Marilyn Monroe in Some Like it Hot, and she was rarely wrong about anything, except maybe her taste in husbands. Cinematically, an awful lot can happen in 25 years and Hollywood as we know it today, emerged from seismic developments that took place a quarter of a century ago. 1989 was a game-changer; an absolutely pivotal year in the evolution of 21st century Hollywood. Chances are, whatever you watch at the multiplex this weekend will be genetically traceable to that dark, iPad-less, internetless, Jedwardless time. For those of us who are not going gentle into the dark night of their forties, the specific date of this Big Bang was August 11th 1989. That was the day that Batman finally opened in the UK.

I had never seen a line of people actually queuing around the block, except in vintage documentaries about Star Wars, but »

- Cai Ross

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Bart & Fleming: Digital Fascism, William Goldman’s Timeless Line; Print Woes

10 August 2014 8:50 AM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Peter Bart and Mike Fleming Jr. worked together for two decades at Daily Variety. In this weekly Sunday column, two old friends get together and grind their axes on the movie business. Off last Sunday, the boys have a lot on their minds.

Fleming: We have entered an age of digital fascism; render an opinion against the grain, and disagreement is followed by insults and threats to end careers. Because of an opinion.

Bart: Are you referring to Javier Bardem, Penelope Cruz and Pedro Almodovar being attacked for signing that petition charging Israel with practicing genocide in the Gaza? It was certainly not a smart move on their part.

Fleming: I get that. Anyone paying attention can see Israel’s existence comes out of an unimaginable genocide attempt in WWII. I wonder if Bardem and Cruz read the fine print when the petition was put under their noses. Provoked by »

- Peter Bart and Mike Fleming Jr

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Megan Fox Facts: 21 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the 'Tmnt' Star

8 August 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

"Transformers" (2007) launched Megan Fox to international stardom -- and into every man's dreams.

This summer, the actress re-teams with Michael Bay -- following their reconciliation -- for another film adaptation of a classic cartoon, "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles." Since breaking out, Fox has been seen in "Jennifer's Body" and "This Is 40," gotten married to her longtime boyfriend, Brian Austin Green, and popped out a couple kids. Now, she's back in action as April O'Neil and looking better than ever.

From her (not so) unusual fear to her connection to Eminem, here are 21 things you probably don't know about Megan Fox.

1. Megan Fox was born May 16, 1986 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to Gloria Cisson and Franklin Thomas Fox.

2. After her parents divorced when she was young, Fox was raised by her mother and stepfather in St. Petersburg, Florida.

3. Fox attended Catholic school and, as part of an agreement with her mother, »

- Jonny Black

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Emma Watson Has Hots for Cate Blanchett’s Fashion Style (photos!)

7 August 2014 7:31 PM, PDT | TheImproper.com | See recent TheImproper.com news »

Emma Watson has the hots for Cate Blanchett. Actually, she’s attracted to Cate’s great sense of style and gets “wardrobe envy” when she sees the English actress on the red carpet. Emma, who is fast becoming a style icon herself, was asked by Vanity Fair magazine who she admired as style icons. Beside Blanchett, she singled out Sofia Coppola, known for her understated stye, French singer and actress Francoise Hardy, who is now 72 and Lauren Bacall, who is now 89. [...] »

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Review: Steven Soderbergh and Clive Owen go back in time with Cinemax's 'The Knick'

6 August 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Early in the new Cinemax drama "The Knick," Dr. John Thackery boasts of "the astonishing modern world in which we live," insisting that "We now live in a time of endless possibility. More has been learned about the human body in the last five years than in the previous 500." What is such an astonishing time to him is a very quaint one for us, since "The Knick" (it premieres Friday at 10) takes place in Manhattan in the year 1900. Viewed through a modern lens, Thackery's surgical techniques seem primitive, even barbarous, but in the context of his time — when a procedure we take for granted like an appendectomy is still considered dangerous and experimental — he and his colleagues are miracle workers. "The Knick" arrives in an era where the possibilities for television drama are as limitless as they were for medicine in 1900. It's a period where a Matthew McConaughey can commit »

- Alan Sepinwall

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New on Video: ‘The Wind Will Carry Us’

4 August 2014 6:35 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Wind Will Carry Us

Written and directed by Abbas Kiarostami

Iran 1999

To say that Abbas Kiarostami’s The Wind Will Carry Us is an unhurried film would be quite the understatement. This deliberately crafted and contemplative work, one of the great Iranian director’s finest films, moves at the pace of life. Not life as in the hustle and bustle or stolid banality of one’s everyday experiences, but life as in the gradual evolution of humankind’s basic existence. Reflecting the lives of those who inhabit the rural Kurdish village that serves as the film’s setting, The Wind Will Carry Us unfolds slowly and episodically, with its drama, or lack thereof, coming and going at a capricious moment’s notice.

Kiarostami begins the film as we follow a car driven by disembodied voices that bicker about directions and banter about the countryside. They drive and drive, along winding roads, »

- Jeremy Carr

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Film4’s New Chief David Kosse Speaks to Variety About Challenges of Role

4 August 2014 11:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — U.K. broadcaster Channel 4 revealed today that the new chief of its filmmaking division, Film4 — which has backed Oscar-winning pics like Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave” and Danny Boyle’s “Slumdog Millionaire” — would be David Kosse, who is president, international, at Universal Pictures. Variety spoke to Kosse about his new role.

Kosse, who joins Film4 on Nov. 1, said it was a bit early to speak about specific plans for Film4, but added that he had no intention of changing the “creative remit” of the production unit. “There continues to be a focus on emerging filmmakers, young talent and creative risk-taking,” he said.

Recent pics from emerging U.K. talent backed by Film4 include Yann Demange’s feature debut “’71,” which premiered in Berlin competition, and Daniel Wolfe’s first film “Catch Me Daddy,” which bowed in Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight.

See Also: David Kosse Named Chief of Channel 4 »

- Leo Barraclough

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David Kosse Named Chief of Channel 4’s Movie Production Arm Film4

4 August 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — David Kosse has been appointed as director of Channel 4’s feature filmmaking division Film4.

Kosse joins from Universal Pictures where he is president, international, and will take up his new post on Nov. 1.

Kosse will oversee the development, financing and green-lighting of all feature films, and support for the production and distribution of all Film4-backed releases both in the U.K. and internationally.

Kosse replaces Tessa Ross, who announced her departure in March to become chief executive of the National Theatre. Kosse will report directly to Channel 4 chief executive David Abraham.

See Also: Film4’s New Chief David Kosse Speaks to Variety About Challenges of Role

Recent films backed by Film4 include Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” Mike Leigh’s “Mr. Turner,” Ken Loach’s “Jimmy Hall” and Jonathan Glazer’s “Under the Skin.”

Upcoming pics include Lone Scherfig’s drama about a boisterous Oxford student dining club, »

- Leo Barraclough

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Films that'd get a fairer hearing if they weren't sequels

29 July 2014 4:42 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Some sequels are doomed to live in the shadow of the hits that triggered them. Here are a few examples...

Following up a successful movie with a sequel is a tough proposition for any writer or director, and it's often the case that such follow-ups fail to recreate the magic of their predecessors. But sometimes, sequels can offer a different yet entertaining experience of their own, and it's even possible that, if they didn't happen to share the same name as an earlier hit film, they might even have been better received.

This article's dedicated to a few of these kinds of films. They offer lots of excitement, comedy, jolts of terror and a smattering of great performances, and might have fared better with audiences and critics had they not been sequels. At the very least, they attempted to do something a little different than the films they followed. While other examples undeniably remain, »

- ryanlambie

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Love According to 21st Century Movies

27 July 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Love is a many-splendored thing. Love lifts us up where we belong. All you need is love!” so says Ewan McGregor in Baz Luhrmann’s classic romantic tragedy, Moulin Rouge!

It’s a thought that has persisted in cinema for well over a century. Love is what motivates characters; it’s a dream they want to realize, a reality they have to face, the content of their musings in their nightly diary entries.

Decades of cinema have seen the nature of other genres completely overturned. More and more, horrors are gearing towards high-concept supernatural thrillers over human killers; comedies are willing to get raunchier, with a whole lot more swearing; action movies are only too eager to show off brutal set-pieces; and comic book movies and sci-fi films have the effects capable of making the unreal real.

But romance? How much has that changed? And how much do we really want it to? »

- Kenji Lloyd

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Melissa McCarthy, Jenny McCarthy and Other Celeb Cousins You Never Knew Were Related

24 July 2014 12:15 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The worst part of being a celebrity, undoubtedly, must be family reunions. All those cousins coming out of the woodwork, asking you to pass along their script or snag an autograph or even help Aunt Agatha buy that new hot tub that she desperately needs. Then there are those happy few stars who don't have to face this problem. Because their cousins are famous, too. In honor of Cousins Day - July 24, to be exact - here are several celebrity cousins who don't have to worry about being the only famous person at their family reunion. Jenny McCarthy and Melissa »

- Nate Jones, @kn8

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Mark Duplass & Elisabeth Moss Struggle in 'The One I Love' Trailer

17 July 2014 12:21 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Right now audiences can see Mark Duplass acting awkwardly beside Melissa McCarthy in the thoroughly disappointing comedy Tammy. But later this summer, a much better display of the actor's talent alongside "Mad Men" star Elisabeth Moss will hit theaters in The One I Love. The indie debuted at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, telling the story of of a marriage on the verge of breaking down. In one last effort, Ethan (Duplass) and Sophie (Moss) take a weekend vacation for one last shot at saving their marriage. Both Moss and Duplass have been said to turn in spectacular performances, and the trailer certainly shows that, along with a style like Sofia Coppola meets Wes Anderson with a sense of ominous oddity. Watch it now! Here's the first trailer for Charlie McDowell's The One I Love, originally from Apple: The One I Love is directed by author Charlie McDowell, making his feature directorial debut, »

- Ethan Anderton

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22 Candid Quotes That Might Make You Love Courtney Love

9 July 2014 2:20 PM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

Courtney Love could easily be considered one of the most polarizing women of our generation. Since forming the band Hole in the late 1980s, she has become both a rock legend and a successful actress (even earning a Golden Globe nomination for her role in 1995's The People vs. Larry Flynt) while also influencing fashion trends, advocating for Lgbt rights, and speaking out against rape and domestic violence. Conversely, Courtney drew ire from the public after her husband Kurt Cobain's suicide in 1994 - with many Nirvana fans blaming her for his untimely passing - and has also been the subject of controversy in recent years due to her struggle with substance abuse and her strained relationship with her 21-year old daughter, Frances Bean Cobain. Though some may debate the things she's said publicly throughout her career, Courtney has also made many poignant - yet contentious - statements over the years. »

- Brittney Stephens

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Palo Alto movie review (Edinburgh International Film Festival)

8 July 2014 6:16 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

A meditative contemplation of the boredom of overprivileged, under-aspiring, shallow, spoiled kids. As you’ve been dying to see. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

I can’t wait for the day when James Franco finally comes out of the performance-art closet and reveals that almost everything he’s done in the past, oh, ten years or so has been part of an intricate ongoing practical joke to yank celebrity culture and our knee-jerk worship of those who are famous. His turn as the charlatan man behind the curtain in Oz the Great and Powerful was a big clue, I think. He’s waiting for someone — anyone — to debunk the smoke and mirrors of the fame that allows him to churn out increasingly ridiculous pontifical junk. And no one does. »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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The Voicemakers: A Sound of Reasoning

6 July 2014 12:35 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The art of expression in the world of film is not just reserved for “professional” movie reviewers. The accessible flexibility that anyone can comment and show delight or dismay regarding the cinema landscape is quite encouraging because Any voice matters in terms of one’s particular preference. From a famed Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic to a blue-collar plumber with an affinity for vintage films from the golden age of Hollywood anyone can harbor a viewpoint about what constitutes quality or queasy filmmaking.

Thankfully, online venues such as Sound on Sight allow for several degrees of opinion, expertise, insight and analysis when it comes to an array of topical interests that cater to the constitution of escapist tastes in film, television, comic books and podcasts.

No, The Voicemakers: A Sound of Reasoning is not a disguised pat-on-the-back to shamelessly promote this site’s accolades. Quite frankly, the site’s staff, regular »

- Frank Ochieng

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 212 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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