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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2002 | 2000

6 items from 2017


The Most Visible Star: Marilyn Monroe’s Acting Talent

15 March 2017 7:52 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The actress is mostly remembered for her good looks, but what about her impressive performances?

In Richard Dyer’s book Heavenly Bodies: Film Stars and Society, he writes that Marilyn Monroe was “the most visible star”: an actress whose life was put on display, and remains so over 50 years after her death. She is one of the most iconic Hollywood stars of all time, her face instantly recognizable to even those who have never seen any of her movies. She is a symbol of beauty, glamor, cinema, femininity, blondness, sexuality, and tragedy. While the world speculates about her personal life — who was she romantically involved with? How did she die? What was she really like? — her career as an actress is overshadowed by her fame.

While she may not have been the greatest actress of all time, she certainly had her fair share of talent and intelligence, and always worked incredibly hard to bring her »

- Angela Morrison

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Rushes. Orson Welles on Netflix, Malick Speaks, Michael Mann on "Heat" & "Collateral," Classic Takedowns

14 March 2017 1:51 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSJohn Huston, Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich on the set of The Other Side of the WindWe're still holding our breath, but it looks like we may all get to see Orson Welles' beleaguered film project The Other Side of the Wind, to be released in some fashion by Netflix.The Tribeca Film Festival, running April 17 - 30, has announced its full lineup. Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and defacto representative in the United States for the appreciation of older films, has died at the age of 84. With his passing, the number of venerable, welcoming advocates for classic cinema is dropping precariously low.Recommended VIEWINGThe proof is the pudding: Director Terrence Malick actually participated in a public, recorded conversation! He was at SXSW to promote his new film, Austin-set Song to Song, and took place in a discussion with Richard Linklater »

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The Yakuza

24 January 2017 11:46 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The Yakuza

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 & 123 min. / Street Date February 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Robert Mitchum, Takakura Ken, Brian Keith, Eiji Okada, Richard Jordan, Keiko Kishi, James Shigeta, Herb Edelman.

Cinematography: Kozo Okazaki, Duke Callaghan

Production Design: Stephen Grimes

Art Direction: Yoshiyuki Ishida

Film Editor: Don Guidice, Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Dave Grusin

Written by: Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader, Robert Towne

Produced by: Michael Hamilburg, Sydney Pollack, Koji Shundo

Directed by Sydney Pollack

 

The Warner Archive Collection is on a roll with a 2017 schedule that has so far released one much-desired library Blu-ray per week. Coming shortly are Vincente Minnelli’s Bells are Ringing, Billy Wilder’s Love in the Afternoon Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend and Val Guest’s When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, and that only takes us through February. First up is a piercing action drama from 1975.

There are favorite movies around Savant central, »

- Glenn Erickson

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TV Review: The CW Updates Archie Comics With ‘Riverdale’

23 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

With all due respect to the Eagles: On TV, high school is the real Hotel California. You can and probably did check out years ago, but television of every genre makes sure that you never escape it. The pressure cooker of nascent adulthood, structured days, uncertain futures, and wildly fluctuating hormones makes for a well of creativity with endless iterations — teenage superheroes, deadly secrets, pop music covers, introspective voiceover.

Riverdale,” the CW’s new teen drama based on the Archie comics, is an eerie and offbeat take on the high school mythos — both addictive and confusing in equal parts. Its incredibly attractive leads, secret backstories, complex buried relationships, and unreliable, unethical adults are reminiscent of Freeform’s “Pretty Little Liars” and the CW’s “Gossip Girl.” But where those shows, and most teen shows, serve as titillating coming-of-age narratives, hovering between the wholesome bubble of innocence and the seductive call of the wider adult world, “Riverdale »

- Sonia Saraiya

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Sundance Film Review: ‘The Yellow Birds’

21 January 2017 6:01 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s unusual, at the Sundance Film Festival, to see a drama about a subject like the Iraq War. The economics of scale required to stage an authentic combat scene don’t tend to mesh with indie-film budgets — and besides, there are enough towering war films in our time that the bar for them has been set extraordinarily high. So say this much for “The Yellow Birds”: When it plunks the audience down into a crumbling urban war zone, where every dirt road and alleyway could be a path to oblivion, the movie, if nothing else, creates a physically convincing atmosphere of instability and fearful tension. The movie opens with U.S. soldiers walking across a dark field, past palm trees (one of which is on fire), in a grimly patterned death march that evokes — ironically — the final moments of “Full Metal Jacket.” And, indeed, Stanley Kubrick’s great »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘Incorporated,’ ’24’ Star Dennis Haysbert: ‘We Are Nosediving Into This Dystopian World’

12 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

After key roles in “24” and “The Unit,” Dennis Haysbert returns to series television in Syfy’s new dystopian drama “Incorporated,” about a world altered by climate change. Haysbert spoke with Variety about the show, which was created by brothers David and Àlex Pastor and executive produced by Ben Affleck and Matt Damon. Also on tap for Haysbert are several films, including the Warner Bros. comedy “Fist Fight,” with Christina Hendricks and Ice Cube.

How did you get involved with “Incorporated”? 

They offered it to me, and I enjoyed the script. I saw growth potential in it. And I liked the pedigree — I knew that it was going to be a quality project. I love sci-fi; I was excited about that. My character, Julian, is a detective, a grand inquisitor.

What kind of developments can we expect from Julian? 

I think you can safely say that there’s an evolution of Julian through the rest of the season »

- Sarah Ahern

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6 items from 2017


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