Julie Christie (I) - News Poster

News

Berlinale Facetime: Isabel Coixet, writer-director of ‘The Bookshop’

Berlinale Facetime: Isabel Coixet, writer-director of ‘The Bookshop’
On Feb. 4, Isabel Coixet became the only women to win two Spanish Academy best picture Goyas. She did so with “The Bookshop,” starring Emily Mortimer, Patricia Clarkson and Bill Nighy, and in 2005 with “The Secret Life of Words,” which she also directed, the only English-language film ever to win a best picture Goya. In “The Bookshop,” Coixet unravels the story of a widow, Florence, who battles provincialism as she opens a bookstore in Hardborough, a sleepy 1950s Suffolk seaside town. The film, an adaptation of Penelope Fitzgerald’s novel, was a Spanish box office hit. “The Bookshop” plays in the Berlinale Special section.

Someone said that books allow readers to discover new realms. Movies too?

I believe so. Storytelling, through words or images, along with love, are both irrefutable proof that a human being is an incomplete being. We need stories and images to find references and clues to live. The discovery
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Poster of the Week: Sir Alan Bates in Posters

Above: UK one sheet for The Shout (Jerzy Skolimowski, UK, 1978)One of the greatest but perhaps less heralded of British actors, Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003) is being deservedly feted over the next week at the Quad Cinema in New York with the retrospective series Alan Bates: The Affable Angry Young Man. The title makes sense: before he had acted on film Bates was in the original West End and Broadway productions of Look Back in Anger, but he played not the disaffected anti-hero Jimmy Porter, made famous on film by Richard Burton, but the amiable Welsh lodger Cliff. Though a performer of great virility, intelligence and passion, he often played second fiddle to his more demonstrative co-stars—whether Anthony Quinn in Zorba the Greek (1964), Lynn Redgrave in Georgy Girl (1966), Julie Christie in Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) and The Go-Between (1971), or Jill Clayburgh in An Unmarried Woman (1978). Consequently, he is
See full article at MUBI »

Berlin Film Review: ‘The Bookshop’

Modern-day bookstore owners may be struggling to stay afloat in the age of Amazon and e-readers, but they don’t have to battle the more deceptively cloaked threat of quaint English conservatism that the 1950s heroine of “The Bookshop” faces with an upper lip of pure cast iron. In picking Penelope Fitzgerald’s slim but subtly potent 1978 novel for screen treatment, internationally inclined Spanish helmer Isabel Coixet (“Elegy,” “Learning to Drive”) once more shows impeccable taste in material, but this is a frustratingly patchy adaptation, in which some of Fitzgerald’s shrewdest observations on the savage politics and politesse of supposedly tranquil English village life get a little bit lost in the Europudding. A fine, sensitive leading turn from Emily Mortimer helps shore up these quiet, lightly dust-covered proceedings, but can’t quite put “The Bookshop” in the black.

Internationally premiering as a special gala at the Berlin Film Festival, “The Bookshop” has already
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2018: Here are all 156 living actresses and actors who could join a 90th anniversary family album on March 4

Oscars 2018: Here are all 156 living actresses and actors who could join a 90th anniversary family album on March 4
In recent days we have reminded you of the two Oscars family album events that happened in 1998 for the 70th anniversary and 2003 for the 75th ceremony. Click on each of those to watch the highly entertaining assemblies of many living actors and actresses from acting categories.

And now, the 90th anniversary show is already being prepared by producers Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd to air Sunday, March 4, on ABC with returning host Jimmy Kimmel. Would that duo want to take on the challenge of assembling such an all-star gathering on the Dolby Theatre stage in Hollywood? Would they be able to convince 90 of the 156 living actresses and actors who won in competitive categories (or received honorary trophies for acting) to join together for a lengthy 15-minute segment?

See Oscar Best Picture Gallery: History of Every Academy Award-Winning Movie

Full lists are below of the people who would be contacted about attending.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Donald Sutherland Insists ‘Don’t Look Now’ Sex Scene Was Not Real Despite ‘Idiotic’ Rumours

  • ET Canada
Donald Sutherland has slammed claims suggesting his sex scene with Julie Christie in the 1973 horror film “Don’t Look Now” was real. Sutherland, 82, discussed the controversial moment, which has had people talking for years, while speaking at the New York premiere of his new movie “The Leisure Seeker”. The Canadian-born actor told the New
See full article at ET Canada »

55 Years of James Bond

It’s been 55 years since James Bond made his debut 55 years ago, when the first Bond film “Dr No”, premiered on the big screen in October 1962.

Ian Fleming wrote the original novel in 1958, which set in motion a multi-billion-dollar film franchise that is still going strong today and is arguably bigger than ever.

From the beginning, it was planned to be a series of Bond films. Fleming had written several novels featuring the character and options that had been taken out to adapt all of them. The first print debut wrote by Fleming was “Casino Royale” but the producers chose “Dr No” to be the first film because of its fast-moving plot, it’s exotic location in sunny Jamaica and it’s topical theme of space rocket launches.

Bond is sent to Jamaica in “Dr No”, which he investigates a disappearance of a fellow British agent. Following up leads and teaming up with local allies,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Stars Support Lorde's Decision To Boycott Israel

Over 100 well-known names – including writers, actors, directors and musicians – have signed a pledge supporting Lorde's decision not to perform in Israel.

The statement was published in The Guardian following backlash over the Kiwi singer’s cancellation of her concert in Tel Aviv. It is a direct response to a full page ad published in the Washington Post on January 1 which called Lorde a bigot and also attacked her homeland of New Zealand.

“We deplore the bullying tactics being used to defend injustice against Palestinians and to suppress an artist’s freedom of conscience. We support Lorde’s right to take a stand,” reads the letter in The Guardian. "Shmuley Boteach, the author and promoter of the advert, supports Israel’s illegal settlements and wrote last month on Breitbart to thank Donald Trump for “electrifying the world” with his recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital in defiance of international law.
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Nightmare (1964)

While us horror lovers revelled in the ripped bodices and cobwebbed corridors of another vampire plagued castle, Hammer was busy trying to clear the halls and make their way into the modern world. Take Nightmare (1964), an effective black and white thriller that shows you don’t need fangs to be fearsome.

Released in its native U.K. in April and stateside in June, Nightmare (Aka the amazing Here’s the Knife, Dear: Now Use It) still has a lot of wandering down darkened hallways, but instead of coming up against the undead, our heroine has to do battle with her own brittle mind. Or has the dead come back for her?

Pity poor Janet (Jennie LindenOld Dracula). Our film opens with her hearing a distant voice calling her name. She leaves the comfort of her bed and follows the whispered voice which leads her to a shadowed room where
See full article at DailyDead »

7 Essential Debut Films Directed By Female Filmmakers, From ‘Ratcatcher’ to ‘The Virgin Suicides’

7 Essential Debut Films Directed By Female Filmmakers, From ‘Ratcatcher’ to ‘The Virgin Suicides’
When Greta Gerwig’s already-lauded “Lady Bird” hits limited release later this week, the actress-writer-director will join a long line of other female filmmakers who used their directorial debut (this one is Gerwig’s solo directorial debut, just for clarity’s sake) to not only launch their careers, but make a huge mark while doing it. Gerwig’s Saoirse Ronan-starring coming-of-age tale is an instant classic, and one that shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to anyone who has enjoyed Gerwig’s charming work as a screenwriter in recent years, bolstered by her ear for dialogue and her love of complicated and complex leading ladies.

While Hollywood still lags when it comes to offering up opportunities to its most talented female filmmakers, many of them have overcome the dismal stats to deliver compelling, interesting, and unique first features. In short, they’re good filmmakers who made good movies,
See full article at Indiewire »

Quote of the Day: Sarah Polley on How Directing Made Her More Aware of Hollywood’s Sexism

Polley on the set of “Take This Waltz”: Magnolia Pictures/IMDb

Actress, writer, and director Sarah Polley is sharing her story about Harvey Weinstein. The producer propositioned Polley, the “Stories We Tell” helmer writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Weinstein suggested that a “very close relationship” with him would mean more acting work for her. “I indicated that he was wasting his time,” Polley recalls. “I just didn’t care that much about an acting career. I loved acting, still do, but I knew, after 14 years of working professionally, that it wasn’t worth it to me, and the reasons were not unconnected to the tone of that meeting.”

As she hints, that encounter with Weinstein was not the first time Polley came up against Hollywood’s misogyny. But she didn’t realize how much show business normalizes predatory behavior until she started directing her own projects.

“Shortly afterward, I started writing and directing short films. I had no idea, until then, how little respect I had been shown as an actor. Now there were no assistant directors trying to cajole me into sitting on their laps, no groups of men standing around to assess how I looked in a particular piece of clothing,” Polley details. “I could decide what I felt was important to say, how to film a woman, without her sexuality being a central focus without context.”

After having a positive, collaborative experience with Julie Christie on the set of her directorial debut, “Away From Her,” Polley decided to return to acting. But while she was more confident in her abilities and voice, Hollywood’s treatment of women was the same as ever. “This industry doesn’t tend to attract the most gentle and principled among us,” Polley says of the alpha male directors and producers she’s worked with. “I had two experiences in the same year in which I went into a film as an actor with an open heart and was humiliated, violated, dismissed and then, in one instance, called overly sensitive when I complained.”

“For a long time, I felt that it wasn’t worth it to me to open my heart and make myself so vulnerable in an industry that makes its disdain for women evident everywhere I turn,” Polley emphasizes. Her ambivalence about the craft is understandable: female actors endure an unbelievable amount of shitty treatment and face a “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” situation when they consider speaking out.

Hopefully, as Polley mentions in her piece, the Weinstein case will mark a turning point. “I hope that the ways in which women are degraded, both obvious and subtle, begin to seem like a thing of the past,” she writes. Amen.

Polley received an Oscar nomination in 2008 for writing “Away From Her,” which stars Christie as a woman living with Alzheimer’s. Polley’s other directorial credits include the infidelity drama “Take This Waltz” and “Stories We Tell,” a documentary about her own family and parentage. She also penned the upcoming Netflix miniseries “Alias Grace,” an adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel.

Quote of the Day: Sarah Polley on How Directing Made Her More Aware of Hollywood’s Sexism was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

  • Indiewire
Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Indiewire »

How Annette Bening Tamed Hollywood Bachelor Warren Beatty: 'Every Day She Surprises Me'

How Annette Bening Tamed Hollywood Bachelor Warren Beatty: 'Every Day She Surprises Me'
Warren Beatty was once famous for being one of Hollywood’s most legendary bachelors — that was until he met an Oscar nominee who changed his ways.

The actor’s list of ex-girlfriends reads like a who’s who from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. Among the stars he romanced: Madonna, Diane Keaton, and Julie Christie. That all changed when Beatty cast Annette Bening in his 1991 film Bugsy.

When they met for lunch in preparation for Bugsy, Beatty knew his life was going to change forever.

“I remember losing interest in the garlic chicken I was eating within 20 seconds,” he previously told People.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Robert Altman Chosen for First-Ever AFI Retrospective

by Ilich Mejía

American director Robert Altman has been selected by the American Film Institute as the focus of AFI Fest's first annual retrospective showcasing the works of an accomplished filmmaker. AFI Fest will run, this year, from November 9 to 16. Each of those days will feature screenings and special discussions of Altman's best work. 

Even though Altman passed over ten years ago, his films are constantly remembered by film fanatics around the globe. His haunting 3 Women recently screened as part of the Film Society of Lincoln Center's retrospective of 1977. Other Altman classics include Julie Christie's bursting curls in McCabe & Mrs. Miller, the fiery politics of Nashville, and Downton Abbey predecesor Gosford Park.

What film are you most excited to see as part of this retrospective? Share your favorite Altman scenes and moments!
See full article at FilmExperience »

An education by Anne-Katrin Titze

Anne-Katrin Titze with Neasa Ní Chianáin and David Rane on the influence of Frederick Wiseman, Da Pennebaker, Kim Longinotto, David Maysles and Albert Maysles: "We're both big, big fans of observational, you know, direct cinema, cinéma vérité." Photo: Marija Silk

"Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past," George Orwell logged in his 1984. This quote, as well as an image of the strolling, memorising book people - Julie Christie and Oskar Werner among them - from François Truffaut's film adaptation of Ray Bradbury's science fiction novel Fahrenheit 451 came to my mind while watching Neasa Ní Chianáin and David Rane's remarkable, enchanted documentary School Life (In Loco Parentis) that kidnaps us into a world-building realm of unlimited imagination.

Headfort School in Ireland: "It's an 18th century house and it has all that wonderful flavour of Harry Potter…"

At the Ace
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

David Lynch and the Nightmarish Meanings of his Hollywood Star Casting

In episode four of Twin Peaks: The Return, an older gentleman has an obscure conversation with Gordon Cole (David Lynch) as he escorts him to the office of FBI Chief of Staff, Denise Bryson (David Duchovny). Their scene together is short but just by his brief appearance Richard Chamberlain evokes a mass of associations in the viewers who recognizes him, maybe as Cannon Films’ Allen Quartermain, maybe as the ambitious priest with impure thoughts of Rachel Ward in The Thornbirds, or maybe as Julie Christie’s husband in Petulia. An icon of classic television thanks to his performance in the prime-time […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

New Trailer for Restored Re-Release of James Ivory's 'Heat and Dust'

"If it gets too boring, I'll run away." Cohen Media Group has debuted an official trailer for the upcoming re-release of the classic romantic adventure Heat and Dust, directed by James Ivory, that was originally released in 1983. Set in India in the 1920s, the story looks back at the life of an English woman named Olivia who becomes fascinated by India and enamored by the local ruler, a nawab who combines British distinction with Indian pomp and ruthlessness. The film's international cast stars Greta Scacchi, Shashi Kapoor, Julie Christie, Christopher Cazenove, Julian Glover, Susan Fleetwood, Patrick Godfrey, and Jennifer Kendal. This is a brand new, 4K restoration meaning it will look and sound better than ever. I have not seen this film myself, but I have heard it's certainly worth watching. For now, check out the trailer. Here's the new re-release trailer (+ poster) for James Ivory's Heat and Dust,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Smackdown 1963: Three from "Tom Jones" and Two Dames

Presenting the Supporting Actresses of '63. Well well, what have we here? This year's statistical uniqueness (the only time one film ever produced three supporting actress nominees) and the character lineup reads juicier than it actually is - your Fab Five are, get this: a saucy wench, a pious auntie, a disgraced lady, a pillpopping royal, and a stubborn nun.

The Nominees 

from left to right: Cilento, Evans, Redman, Rutherford, Skalia

In 1963 Oscar voters went for an all-first-timers nominee list in Supporting Actress. The eldest contenders would soon become Dames (Margaret Rutherford and Edith Evans were both OBEs at the time). Rutherford, the eventual winner, was the only nominee with an extensive film history and she was in the middle of a hot streak with her signature role as Jane Marple which ran across multiple films from through 1961-1965. In fact, Agatha Christie had just dedicated her new book "The
See full article at FilmExperience »

The 80th Academy Awards: If I had been a voter

Here we go again folks! As promised (though perhaps a bit later than initially planned), I’m diving back into the world of previous Oscar ceremonies. This time, I have my sights set on the 80th Academy Awards ceremony. You should know the drill by now. I’m going to state what I would have picked in the major eight categories if I had been lucky enough to have been able to vote. In most cases, it deviates from the actual winner. You’ll see how much that was the case this time around, and sit tight, as I do hope to make this a bit more of a consistent thing (excuse the gap again) and really go back as far as I can go. Until then, just enjoy this new one… Alright then, once again here goes nothing ladies and gentlemen…behold my picks for this particular ceremony: Best
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

No Trains to Ambrosia: Close-Up on John Schlesinger’s "Billy Liar"

Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. John Schlesinger's Billy Liar (1963) is playing July 16 - August 15, 2017 in the United States as part of the series John Schlesinger's First Masterpieces.Billy Fisher, a cheerful twenty-something lad from Yorkshire, is going to have a great future. For now, he only has a small office position in his dull small city, but Billy has already landed a job in London writing for a popular TV comedian. He is also working on a novel that soon enough will bring him fame and fortune. He is also engaged to a girl. Actually, two girls. And he doesn’t really want to marry any of them. Also, the TV star doesn’t really know that Billy exists. And he hasn’t started on the novel. Billy just has a vivid imagination and speaks before he thinks—some people prefer to call it compulsive lying.
See full article at MUBI »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites