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Revisiting the film of Stephen King's Creepshow 2

Rebecca Lea Jun 5, 2017

We look back at the films based on Stephen King's writing. This time? It's Creepshow 2...

The film: The Creep arrives in town with a fresh batch of stories for another boy named Billy, who delights in grabbing a copy of the Creepshow comic. He reads the tale of Old Chief Wood’nhead first, in which an elderly couple find themselves victimised by an armed robbery in their general store. Next, The Raft, in which four college students take trip to a lake to go swimming, only to find out there’s something in the water. Finally, a married woman travelling home from a meeting with her lover loses control of her car and runs down a hitch-hiker, but flees from the scene to keep her life in order.

See related Star Wars: Rogue One review Star Wars: Rogue One - what did you think?
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blu-ray Review: Creepshow 2 [Special Edition]

  • DailyDead
As a lifelong fan of the original Creepshow—one of the first R-rated horror movies I ever saw as a kid and still my favorite horror anthology of all-time—it has taken me years to come to terms with the fact that Creepshow 2 is not bad. In fact, it’s quite good at times. But because it failed to capture the lightning-in-a-bottle magic of the first film (I mean, you had George A. Romero, Stephen King, and Tom Savini all working at their peaks), I have always ignored the fact that there’s a lot to like in Creepshow 2, even if it does fall short of its predecessor’s greatness. Thankfully, Arrow’s new special edition Blu-ray helped put me in my place.

Based on three more stories by King, Creepshow 2 finds original director Romero trading in the director’s chair for screenwriting duties. Calling the shots
See full article at DailyDead »

Best James Bond Scenes: The Roger Moore era part 1: 1970s

It is no secret that Roger Moore holds the record as the actor who played James Bond the most, his tally an impressing 7. There are a bevy of reasons why this was the case, the most obvious being that each one of his films were massive financial successes, the only bump in the road being his second outing, The Man With the Golden Gun, which itself speaks to the immense stature of the franchise when the film that earns 97 million dollars is the ‘bump in the road.’ There was a shift in tone that permeated in the Bond films once Roger Moore took over the mantle from Sean Connery. Whereas the latter brought toughness and grittiness to his interpretation of the famous super spy all the while proving to be as smooth as butter, the former injected some light comedic flair. It was definitely still James Bond on the screen,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Moonraker’ Delivers Bond to a Post ‘Star Wars’ Generation

Moonraker

Directed by Lewis Gilbert

Screenplay by Christopher Wood

UK, 1979

Moonraker has the unique distinction of being the most absurd and over-the-top Bond film produced in 50 years of the series. Spy films exist in a genre unto themselves, but the Bond films sometimes like to crossover into other popular genres as well. The first clear example of this was 1973’s Live and Let Die, which mimicked the then popular Blaxploitation genre. When Moonraker was released however, the Bond series took this genre crossover to its extreme, resulting in a Bond film as much a science fiction saga as it is screwball comedy. Certainly one of the strangest Bond films to date, Moonraker holds a unique admiration among Bond fans and remained the highest grossing of all the Bond films until the release of Goldeneye in 1995.

Before Moonraker came 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me which concluded with the end credit
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Countdown to Spectre – Moonraker

Ricky Church continues his countdown to Spectre with a review of Moonraker

In 1979 the Bond franchise took a turn to science fiction as Bond ventured into space for his adventure in Moonraker. Though he had previously investigated space programs or fought against space lasers, he had never before gone into outer space. Why did the franchise decide to veer in such a sci-fi direction? Well, it has a little something to do with a small 1977 film you may have heard of called Star Wars.

Due to Star Wars being a surprise financial and critical success, sci-fi reemerged as a popular film genre and made many studios eager to produce a sci-fi film. Rather than film For Your Eyes Only, announced at the end of Spy Who Loved Me, producer Albert Broccoli decided to do Moonraker instead to get in on the sci-fi bandwagon. What resulted was a disjointed film that,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

MI5 Review: Cruise Shows Why After All These Years He Remains a Movie Superstar

'Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation': Tom Cruise. 'Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation': Tom Cruise, the last action hero There are two impossible missions in the latest Mission: Impossible. The first involves Chechen terrorists, political assassinations, the Vienna Opera House, and a car that unlocks when the user places his hand on the driver's side window (Detroit, get on that). The other impossible mission, one that is not only accepted and completed, but conquered and victoriously ground into dust, is proving that 53-year old Tom Cruise is still an action star. As Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation demonstrates with cruel ease, Cruise isn't just an action hero. In the post-movie star age, he is, with apologies to a certain Austrian bodybuilder whose drawing power is all but terminated, the last action hero. What makes him thus is not just his supreme confidence, compact good looks, and million dollar smile. The camera has
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

James Bond 007: revisiting Licence To Kill

Before Casino Royale took James Bond down a darker path, there was Timothy Dalton's final 007 outing, Licence To Kill...

So this is the anti-Bond. Stripped of the requisite wit and mischief. Short of temper, heavy of touch. The SPECTREs of yore replaced by a drugs cartel. World domination downgraded to a heroin monopoly. Glamour smothered by grit. Joy drowned in the bloodshed. The icon of British cinema reduced to an American cop show – MI6 Vice, Hawaii 007 – timeless style swamped by the vulgarity and cash of the late-1980s, a case of ‘Sayonara, Mr Bond’ and everything you stand for. Derivative, needlessly violent, no identity, no soul – it’s just Not Bond, dammit! All nonsense, of course. The open-minded know this brutal, brilliant outing is about as good as the series can get.

The Villain: Franz Sanchez is unquestionably the great forgotten villain of the franchise. He possesses all the vital characteristics: charm,
See full article at Den of Geek »

James Bond 007: revisiting Moonraker

There's a good case to be made for this being the silliest Bond of them all, but Moonraker's still a lot of fun...

Well, we’ve come a long, long way since From Russia With Love. Moonraker: a film that redefined the possibilities of the Bond franchise if only by sheer scale of stupidity. The space bits are relatively by-the-numbers (other than being in space). However, the script was probably written in crayon. Chases happen without explanation, people randomly bump into each other, the utterly implausible is presented as mundane. Purists think of Istanbul and weep. But treat the whole thing as a comedy – perhaps a gentle spoof – and you’ll actually enjoy yourself. A plot-hole drinking game will get everyone plastered.

The Villain: Weirdly good. The master of the dry putdown – “James Bond. You defy my attempts to devise an amusing death for you” – Hugo Drax almost steals the film.
See full article at Den of Geek »

James Bond: 10 Bond Girls Who Became Massive Stars

MGM

The James Bond movies have a formula – gadgets, guns, car chases, fight scenes, and, most importantly, beautiful women whom Bond (improbably, it has to be said) seduces at every turn. It’s this very formula that has helped turn Ian Fleming’s super spy into a household name and global brand.

The ‘honour’ of being a Bond girl is bestowed upon few, and while they become part of a legacy, it can be hard for the actresses who portray the ‘girls’ to maintain a level of mainstream success. It’s all too common, sadly, to see women of a fine acting calibre unable to find new material, or to break out of the objectified roles altogether – actresses such as Britt Ekland, Lois Chiles, Barbara Bach, and Izabella Scorupco for example, failed to maintain the global success and exposure that a Bond film gifts.

However, fortunately, more and more Bond
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Movie News: In Memoriam, An Appreciation of Richard Kiel

Los Angeles – He was 7 foot 2 inches tall, an imposing figure that made for one of the most memorable James Bond villains. Richard Kiel portrayed “Jaws” in two Bond films – “The Spy Who Loved Me” and “Moonraker” – and left an unforgettable mark as a character actor with a distinctive look and persona. Richard Kiel died at age 74 on September 10th, 2014.

Richard Kiel in 2010

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Richard Kiel was born in Detroit, Michigan, and made his first appearance in the TV show “Laramie” in 1960. Throughout the 1960s, he made appearances in low budget horror movies and television, most notably in a famous episode of “The Twilight Zone,” entitled “To Serve Man,” and in the TV series “The Wild, Wild West.” It was a western series in the 1970s, “The Barbary Coast,” that caught the attention of the Bond producers, and the villain Jaws was born.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Review: The Poirot Collection

Mention the name Hercule Poirot and chances are that the first thing that pops into your mind is David Suchet’s moustachioed visage. Suchet, of course, portrayed Agatha Christie’s famous Belgian export for 24 years, from 1989 to 2013, during which time he starred in every major Poirot story that the author wrote. As great as these televisual treats were, though, I have very fond memories of the trio of Poirot movies that are included in this new Blu-ray collection.

Though I never saw them at the cinema, Murder On The Orient Express (1974), Death On The Nile (1978) and Evil Under The Sun (1982) always seemed to crop up on television whenever there was a Bank Holiday (on rotation with The Great Escape (1963) among others) and guaranteed that we as a family would sit together, glued to the screen, no matter how many times we’d seen them.

The first of these three movies,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Tonight's Double-0 MovieMovie: Moonraker Starring Roger Moore

"At least I shall have the pleasure of putting you out of my misery. Poor, desolate, Mr. Bond."

If you like a little Star Wars with your James Bond, then tonight's feature is for you. The eleventh movie in the Eon Productions series, Moonraker finds 007 (Roger Moore) tasked with investigating the hijacking of a space shuttle on loan to the United Kingdom. The trail leads Bond from Italy to Brazil, where he discovers that the manufacturer of the space shuttle, Drax Industries, is also fabricating a deadly new nerve gas that kills people, but spares animals. Joined by CIA operative Holly Goodhead (Lois Chiles), Bond stows away on a Moonraker space shuttle destined for Hugo Drax's (Michael Lonsdale) orbiting space station, where he must find a way to stop the madman from releasing the nerve gas into the atmosphere and killing every living soul on Earth.

From the lush rainforests
See full article at ReelzChannel »

‘Moonraker’ Delivers Bond to a Post ‘Star Wars’ Generation

Moonraker

Directed by Lewis Gilbert

Screenplay by Christopher Wood

UK, 1979

Moonraker has the unique distinction of being the most absurd and over-the-top Bond film produced in 50 years of the series. Spy films exist in a genre unto themselves, but the Bond films sometimes like to crossover into other popular genres as well. The first clear example of this was 1973′s Live and Let Die, which mimicked the then popular Blaxploitation genre. When Moonraker was released however, the Bond series took this genre crossover to its extreme, resulting in a Bond film as much a science fiction saga as it is screwball comedy. Certainly one of the strangest Bond films to date, Moonraker holds a unique admiration among Bond fans and remained the highest grossing of all the Bond films until the release of Goldeneye in 1995.

Before Moonraker came 1977′s The Spy Who Loved Me which concluded with the end credit
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Best James Bond Scenes: The Roger Moore era part 1: 1970s

It is no secret that Roger Moore holds the record as the actor who played James Bond the most, his tally an impressing 7. There are a bevy of reasons why this was the case, the most obvious being that each one of his films were massive financial successes, the only bump in the road being his second outing, The Man With the Golden Gun, which itself speaks to the immense stature of the franchise when the film that earns 97 million dollars is the ‘bump in the road.’ There was a shift in tone that permeated in the Bond films once Roger Moore took over the mantle from Sean Connery. Whereas the latter brought toughness and grittiness to his interpretation of the famous super spy all the while proving to be as smooth as butter, the former injected some light comedic flair. It was definitely still James Bond on the screen,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

James Bond Declassified: File #11 - 'Moonraker' leaves the world of reality behind

  • Hitfix
James Bond Declassified: File #11 - 'Moonraker' leaves the world of reality behind
James Bond 007 Declassified File #11: "Moonraker" This series will trace the cinema history of James Bond, while also examining Ian Fleming's original novels as source material and examining how faithful (or not) the films have been to his work. Directed by Lewis Gilbert Screenplay by Christopher Wood Produced by Albert R. Broccoli and William P. Cartlidge and Michael G. Wilson Characters / Cast James Bond / Roger Moore Dr. Holly Goodhead / Lois Chiles Hugo Drax / Michael Lonsdale Jaws / Richard Kiel Corrine Dufour / Corinne Clery Sir Frederick Gray / Geoffrey Keen Chang / Toshiro Suga Manuela /...
See full article at Hitfix »

Bond-a-Thond #11: 'Moonraker' (1979)

Bond-a-Thond #11: 'Moonraker' (1979)
MTV Movies Blog is currently running what we call the Bond-a-Thond. Every Wednesday we're taking a look back at a single (official) Bond film, giving you the vitals and seeing how it holds up, right up until the release of "Skyfall" on November 9. Feel free to watch along with us and share your thoughts or just kick back and enjoy the Bond.

Moonraker (1979)

Plot: After a space shuttle is stolen off the back of an airliner, Bond must discover who is behind the theft.

Title Meaning: "Moonraker" is the name of the line of space shuttles created by Hugo Drax, one of which is stolen during the opening sequence.

Theme Song: "Moonraker" performed by Shirley Bassey.

Bond: Roger Moore

Villain: Michael Lonsdale makes a memorable turn as the jet black-haired nihilist Hugo Drax.

Bond Girl: Dr. Holly Goodhead, a CIA agent embedded in Drax Industries, played by Lois Chiles.

"Bond,
See full article at MTV Movies Blog »

Charlize Theron, Halle Berry and Cameron Diaz: Models who've turned actress

Candice Bergen: With several different careers to her credit, modeling was one of them for this multiple Emmy winner for "Murphy Brown," seen most recently on Broadway in "The Best Man."

Ali MacGraw: Her movie output wasn't enormous, but "Love Story" alone was a hugely significant credit for her.

Cybill Shepherd: One of the most stunning transitions from model to actress was made by this "Moonlighting" star in her iconic screen debut, "The Last Picture Show."

Lauren Hutton: "American Gigolo" cemented her transition from someone who posed for the cameras into someone who truly acted for them.

Lois Chiles: Roles that relied largely on her beauty ("The Way We Were," "Moonraker") led to her deeper acting ("Broadcast News," "Say Anything ... .")

Brooke Shields: A novelty as an actress when she made "Pretty Baby" and "Endless Love," one of the most popular teen models ever became
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Coma - Blu-ray Review

Fashions and special effects might be the tell-tale item that makes you recognize Coma is a film from years past. However, the storyline, thrills, and acting are top notch enough to make you forget those items and get caught up in the suspense. Susan Wheeler (Genevieve Bujold) and Mark Bellows (Michael Douglas) is not only a couple but they.re residents at Boston General Hospital. Mark is jostling for the position of chief resident and looks like he.s going to achieve it. Susan is under a large amount of stress both in her relationship with Mark, but her best friend Nancy (Lois Chiles) goes in for a routine surgery that tragically ends with her in a coma. Susan
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

James Bond Retrospective: For Your Eyes Only (1981)

To mark the 50th Anniversary of one of the most successful movie franchises of all time and with filming almost complete on James Bond’s 23rd official outing in Skyfall due for release later this year, I have been tasked with taking a retrospective look at the films that turned author Ian Fleming’s creation into one of the most recognised and iconic characters in film history.

Following on from Bond’s previous mission into outer space for Moonraker, which although it was a huge success at the box office provided some of the worst excesses of the series so far preferring a more humorous approach over the serious spy thrills of the early days in the character’s long history. The film had also proved to be a costly exercise requiring co-financing from the French wing of United Artists to cover the budget. Series producer Albert R. Broccoli wisely
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

New this Week: ‘Contagion,’ ‘Warrior’ and ‘Hanna (DVD)’

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star - Nick Swardson, Don Johnson, Christina Ricci

Contagion - Matt Damon, Kate Winslet, Jude Law

Warrior - Tom Hardy, Nick Nolte, Joel Edgerton

Movie of the Week

Warrior

The Stars: Tom Hardy, Nick Nolte, Joel Edgerton

The Plot: The youngest son (Hardy) of an alcoholic former boxer (Nolte) returns home, where he’s trained by his father for competition in a mixed martial arts tournament — a path that puts the fighter on a collision corner with his older brother (Edgerton).

The Buzz: The world is pretty big, and there are a lot of folks out there busy populating it, so I guess it stands to reason that similar stories would crop up, even if they’re both insanely inspirational in their against-all-odds/too-good-to-be-true essence. I am, of course, nodding to the obvious similarities between last year’s (phenomenal
See full article at Scorecard Review »
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