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A Cold Take on the French Film Industry: Close-Up on "Irma Vep"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Olivier Assayas' Irma Vep (1996) is showing November 30 - December 30, 2017 in the United States and December 6 - January 5, 2018 in most countries around the world.An action movie star from Hong Kong, Maggie Cheung (played by Maggie Cheung) arrives in Paris and right off the airplane, exhausted and jet-lagged, finds herself in the production hell of an arthouse film that she was hired to star in. The movie is a creative (allegedly) remake of Louis Feuillade’s classic silent series Les vampires, helmed by an aging New Wave director René Vidal (Jean-Pierre Léaud). Vidal, way past his prime, doesn’t seem entirely certain about what he is doing and why but he is adamant about his vision of Maggie as Irma Vep (an anagram of ‘vampire’)—an acrobatic thief whose tight black garment is for the remake’s
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: Mondo’s “Irma Vep”

  • MUBI
In a very welcome development for connoisseurs of film graphics, Mubi has partnered with the prodigiously creative talents at Mondo to launch a new series of limited-edition posters for films we love. The “New Art for Timeless Cinema” series kicks off with Olivier Assayas’s modern classic Irma Vep (now playing on Mubi in the United States, and coming soon to the platform around the world). To get your hands on this beautiful screen-printed 18" x 24" poster, designed by artist Sam Smith (no stranger to this column), simply invite your friends to join Mubi. When five of them start a free trial, the poster is yours! You can find out more at mubi.com/referrals. I asked Sam to share his thoughts on his design process as well as some of his alternative designsI jumped at the chance to design something for this movie, which exists in an elite category as one of the most meta,
See full article at MUBI »

New to Streaming: ‘Happy Together,’ ‘Detroit,’ ‘Silence,’ ‘Irma Vep,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Detroit (Kathryn Bigelow)

Late into Detroit, Kathryn Bigelow’s docudrama recounting the racial terrorism that took place at the Algiers hotel during the 1967 Detroit riots, one of the innocent, young black men who’s been tortured for nearly the entirety of the movie is given a chance at escape. The camera follows him in his moment of triumph as the man weaves around corners, back alleys, and under a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Lust, Love and Longing: How a Hong Kong Photographer Captured Wong Kar-wai’s Cinematic Mood

Lust, Love and Longing: How a Hong Kong Photographer Captured Wong Kar-wai’s Cinematic Mood
A suited Tony Leung embracing Maggie Cheung, eyes closed and wearing that impeccably fitted floral qipao — it’s the quintessential image of romantic moodiness in Wong Kar-wai’s 2000 film In the Mood for Love. This is just one of the moments captured by famed Hong Kong artist Wing Shya, who made his name shooting on set as the legendary Chinese filmmaker’s exclusive photographer.

After 25 years in the industry, Wing just launched a limited-edition three-book box set of his work at the opening of his retrospective at the Shanghai Centre of Photography (SCoP).

“I change my direction regularly,” says Wing, who is definitely...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’

Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’
Lyon The Lumière Festival honored Wong Kar-wai with the Lumière Award on Friday following a wide-ranging discussion between the Chinese filmmaker and the festival director Thierry Frémaux about his life and career.

Asked about his early influences during the master class, held in front of a packed house at the majestic Théâtre des Célestins ahead of the evening’s award ceremony, Wong said he moved with his family from Shanghai to Hong Kong as a child in 1962 before the onset of the Cultural Revolution. Since the family had no friends or relatives in Hong Kong and did not speak Cantonese, Wong regularly went to the movies with his mother.

“It’s all because of my mother. My mother is a big film buff – she enjoyed watching movies. The fact that we didn’t have any friends and relatives in this new city, the only thing she liked to do was take me to the cinema. We spent almost
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wong Kar Wai Feted at Thierry Fremaux's Lyon Lumiere Festival

Wong Kar Wai Feted at Thierry Fremaux's Lyon Lumiere Festival
The audience at this year's Lumiere Film Festival was in the mood for love, with Cannes topper Thierry Fremaux, directors Olivier Assayas and Bertrand Tavernier and actress Isabelle Adjani celebrating filmmaker Wong Kar Wai in a lavish ceremony Friday night in Lyon, France.

The ceremony was marked by emotional speeches — Assayas (who is divorced from In the Mood for Love star Maggie Cheung) called Wong “a grand poet of cinema” — and raucous routines.

Zhang Ziyi sent a video message, telling her Grandmaster director that he “should get awards everyday.”

Wong's longtime cinematographer Christopher Doyle also took the stage with...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Looking back at Jackie Chan’s Project A movies

Craig Lines Aug 2, 2017

The martial arts master Jackie Chan made some amazing movies. We take a look back at the superb Project A series...

It’s a mystery to me why Jackie Chan appears in so few Greatest Director Of All-Time lists. I mean, sure, he’s a household name and any martial arts enthusiast, no matter how deep or casual, will be quick to let you know how good he is at fighting. Yet, outside the genre fandom, he rarely seems to get the respect he deserves as a filmmaker. Perhaps the problem is that two of the most critically dismissed or maligned genres in film are action and comedy, which also happen to be the two things Jackie Chan does best.

See related American Horror Story renewed for seasons 8 and 9 American Horror Story: Roanoke might be its best season yet American Horror Story season 6: Roanoke Chapter 10 Ryan Murphy
See full article at Den of Geek »

New to Streaming: ‘Song to Song,’ ‘Personal Shopper,’ ‘The Lost City of Z,’ ‘Okja,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

David Lynch: The Art Life (Jon Nguyen, Rick Barnes, and Olivia Neergaard-Holm)

Before David Lynch was a filmmaker, he was a struggling painter, whose lifeblood was to “drink coffee, smoke cigarettes, and paint.” That’s what he dubbed “the art life,” and what an image – as featured in the many contemporary photos seen in this new documentary – it is, the bequiffed 20-something Lynch sitting back in his Philadelphia studio,
See full article at The Film Stage »

China Abuzz Over Local Talent Invited to Join Academy

China Abuzz Over Local Talent Invited to Join Academy
Chinese media were abuzz Thursday over the record number of Chinese filmmakers and actors who have been invited to become new members of the Academy, with some commentators saying that it could boost the country’s chances of winning an Oscar.

But others said that the Academy’s decision to include more Chinese and Asian faces was an effort to boost diversity rather than a bow by Hollywood to China, and that the new Chinese additions would have a negligible impact on Chinese films’ Oscar prospects.

Fourteen industry heavyweights from mainland China and Hong Kong are among the 774 new invited members. The news made headlines throughout Greater China.

“China raves over record number of Chinese filmmakers to join the Academy,” one headline declared.

The 10 invitees from Hong Kong are actresses Maggie Cheung (“In the Mood for Love”) and Carina Lau (“Days of Being Wild”); actors Tony Leung (“In the Mood for Love”) and Donnie Yen (“Ip Man
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Olivier Assayas to Preside Over Jury of Locarno Film Festival’s 70th Edition

Olivier Assayas to Preside Over Jury of Locarno Film Festival’s 70th Edition
Paris – Olivier Assayas, the French director/screenwriter of “Personal Shopper” and “Clouds of Sils Maria,” will preside over the international jury of the 70th edition of Locarno Film Festival.

One of Europe’s most critically acclaimed auteurs, Assayas won Cannes’ director prize last year for “Personal Shopper,” a supernatural drama with Kristen Stewart. “Clouds of Sils Maria” also competed at Cannes and earned Stewart a Cesar for best actress. Most recently, Assayas penned the script of Roman Polanski’s “Based on a True Story” which played out of competition at this year’s Cannes.

“As an auteur for whom formal research is tied to narrative requirements, Assayas has proved adept at always bringing out the talent of his cast,” the Locarno festival said, citing the “remarkable female roles played by actresses such as Emmanuelle Béart, Maggie Cheung, Virginie Ledoyen, Connie Nielsen and Kristen Stewart.”

Assayas’ international jury will select the winner of the festival’s Grand Prize
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Olivier Assayas Named President of Locarno Festival Jury

Olivier Assayas Named President of Locarno Festival Jury
Writer and director Olivier Assayas has been named president of the international jury of the Locarno Film Festival in Switzerland.

Assayas directed Kristen Stewart in Clouds of Sils Maria, for which she became the first American actress to win a Cesar award. He recently teamed up with Stewart again for Personal Shopper, which won him the best director honor last year in Cannes.

He has worked with a variety of leading actresses throughout his career, including Emmanuelle Beart, Maggie Cheung, Virginie Ledoyen and Connie Nielsen.

Assayas, in conjunction with the international jury, will pick the winner of the festival’s grand prize, the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Welcome to the Academy (2017 Invitee List)

The Academy continues its diversity push this year with a record 774 new invitations for membership including people from all over the world. The youngest this year is Elle Fanning and the oldest is Betty White. The list is 39% female this year and 30% people of color.

Chinese superstar screen partners Maggie Cheung & Tony Leung Chiu Wai are finally invited!We must also note that AMPAS's diversity push is also doubling as a major expansion. They're not just inviting differently (i.e. less white men and more women and people of color) but More in general. If all of the invitees accepted the invites from this year and last that's 1400ish new members in two years for an institution that previously kept its ranks steady around the 6,000 member mark. 

Everyone's gagging over Gal Gadot being invited but that's obvious. She's in a phenomenon sized hit at the moment and timing is everything
See full article at FilmExperience »

Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion

Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences continues its quest to diversify its largely white male membership ranks and Wednesday’s announcement of its annual invitation list numbered a record 774.

Among them are “Moonlight” director Barry Jenkins and “Get Out” director Jordan Peele. (They can both choose between the writer and director branches.) Writer-actress-producer Brit Marling (Netflix’s “The Oa”) also landed an invite from the writers branch, along with British actor Simon Pegg (“Shaun of the Dead”).

Indian stars invited include Aimir Kahn, Irrfan Kahn, Salman Kahn, Amitab Bachchan and his daughter in law, Aishwarya Rai. Other international stars receiving the nod include Monica Bellucci, Maggie Cheung, Gal Gadot, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Naomie Harris, and Rinko Kikuchi.

Read More: Netflix’s Next Big Move? Hacking the Oscars

American adds include Leslie Jones, Kristen Stewart, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Colman Domingo, Viggo Mortensen, Mike Mills, Shari Redstone, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Joss Whedon,
See full article at Indiewire »

Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion

Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences continues its quest to diversify its largely white male membership ranks and Wednesday’s announcement of its annual invitation list numbered a record 774.

Among them are “Moonlight” director Barry Jenkins and “Get Out” director Jordan Peele. (They can both choose between the writer and director branches.) Writer-actress-producer Brit Marling (Netflix’s “The Oa”) also landed an invite from the writers branch, along with British actor Simon Pegg (“Shaun of the Dead”).

Indian stars invited include Aimir Khan, Irrfan Khan, Salman Khan, Amitabh Bachchan and his daughter in law, Aishwarya Rai. Other international stars receiving the nod include Monica Bellucci, Maggie Cheung, Gal Gadot, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Naomie Harris, and Rinko Kikuchi.

Read More: Netflix’s Next Big Move? Hacking the Oscars

American adds include Leslie Jones, Kristen Stewart, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Colman Domingo, Viggo Mortensen, Mike Mills, Shari Redstone, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Joss Whedon,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’
It’s no secret that sex sells, and movies are no exception. But while plenty of films like to show gratuitous sex, they’re not always very good. That’s a problem, since movies have the power to shape not only the cultural norms, but personal ones. And what could be more personal than sex? Sexuality is an integral part of the human experience, not some sensational or shameful ploy to sell tickets (though it doesn’t hurt).

That’s why we think it’s important to single out the very best films that also happen to be incredibly sexy, titillating, and provocative. These are not only some of our favorite films in general, but they’re films that celebrate the broad spectrum of human sexuality while telling stories as cinematic as they are personal. Some don’t have any sex scenes at all, while some are notoriously near-pornographic. When these movies do show sex it is always in service of the story, and always in order to challenge, subvert, or celebrate contemporary beliefs about sexuality.

Turn on (and get turned on) by our list of the 25 best sexy movies of the 21st century (well, so far). You know you want to.

25. “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (2008)

Undeniably sexy and amusing at once, Woody Allen’s 2008 Spain-set dramedy delights in pushing its various players into all sorts of romantic permutations and configurations. Anchored by Scarlett Johansson in a sneaky performance as the eponymous Cristina (pre-breakout Rebecca Hall is her best pal Vicky), the film follows a pair of friends as they meet and make lots of love with the beguiling Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), who isn’t at all thrown off by the possibility of having two lovely ladies in his bed. In fact, he’s got another one to think about too, his free-spirited ex-wife (Penelope Cruz), who he just can’t get out of his head (or heart). On the surface, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” is a dead sexy romp about free-wheeling love-makers (complete with plenty of naughty bits), but it’s also a film that boldly explores issues of fluidity and fidelity with an uncharacteristically easy touch. -Ke

24. “Shortbus” (2006)

With its three-person blowjob circle, non-simulated sex scenes including ejaculation, and close-up of a pee stream unleashing into a bathtub, “Shortbus” is not for everyone. It’s an ambitious film, one that attempts to have fun, be sexy, and tell a good story. If anyone could pull it off, it would be the man behind “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” John Cameron Mitchell. “Shortbus” feels as much like an ensemble comedy as a playful experiment, though the two main characters are a sex therapist who’s never had an orgasm and a retired gay sex worker experimenting with opening up his relationship. With their partners, they both begin attending a weekly artist and sex salon, each hoping inspiration will strike. Mitchell wanted to use sex in new cinematic ways, “because it’s too interesting to be left to porn.” If it’s interesting sex you want, “Shortbus” has got it. -Jd

23. “Brokeback Mountain” (2005)

The end of this film is so movingly profound that your memory of it might not be that it was all that sexy. The love between these two men, buried under their rugged cowboy exteriors, ends with what can only be described as a sense of life-defining tragedy. Yet it is those brief moments where they let themselves go and unleash their animalistic passion, which “Crouching Tiger” director Ang Lee captures in his normal visceral fashion, that add a level of eroticism and physically affection that nearly makes all the pain worth it. Ennis and Jack rotate from almost fighting, as they pull at each others’ denim-clad exterior, to moments of being naked and incredibly tender. It’s virtually every cowboy fantasy rolled up into one. That they can only be themselves in the privacy of the great outdoors makes everything that much more liberating. Watching this film in 2005 felt taboo and rebellious, which resulted in a charged atmosphere in packed mainstream cineplexes around the country. -Co

22. “In the Cut” (2003)

Jane Campion’s handle on female desire has always been one of her best attributes as a director (and she’s got a lot of them), but nothing in her filmography is as overtly sexy and emotionally challenging as her 2003 Meg Ryan-starrer “In the Cut” (and that includes “The Piano,” which has a sexiness and eroticism all its own). Our first introduction to Ryan’s character is rooted in her coming to heady terms with her own sexuality, a theme that carries over throughout the often grisly drama. Increasingly drawn to Mark Ruffalo as a moody detective looking to solve a local murder that Frannie is tangentially involved in, Ryan’s character pushes the boundaries of “acceptable” desire. It’s a theme that Campion giddily plays into with some of modern cinema’s most satisfying and profound sex scenes, many of which center on — gasp — Frannie’s own pleasure over that of Ruffalo’s character. -Ke

21. “Hustle & Flow” (2005)

Craig Brewer’s crowdpleaser about a pimp dreaming of music fame is anchored by strong performances from Terrence Howard, Taraji P. Henson, and Taryn Manning. Howard plays Djay, while Henson and Manning are Shug and Nola, two of his girls. Hot-tempered and passionate, Djay begins making tracks with his friend Key (Anthony Anderson), and discovers he has a gift for lyrics. The catchy original soundtrack helps sell the story, as Djay’s songs seem to actually have a chance at getting radio play. While the strip club setting provides ample shots of semi-nude women, Djay and Shug’s sweet romance gives the film its emotional core and shows a softer side to Djay (and his temper). Their undeniable chemistry leads the previously timid Shug to throw down a sexy hook, her raspy croon on “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” making Henson’s star power glaringly obvious. -Jd

20. “Beyond the Lights” (2014)

Chemistry is the name of the game in Gina Prince-Bythewood’s freight-train fast music industry romance, which pairs up rising starlet Gugu Mbatha-Raw (pure charm) alongside pre-“Birth of a Nation” Nate Parker. The pair exhibit major fireworks from the start, imagining Mbatha-Raw as hot new pop star Noni Jean, a big talent who is dangerously close to burning out and fading away, before she falls into the protective arms Parker’s do-gooder cop, Kaz Nicol. Prince-Bythewood’s film cannily sneaks in big questions about fame and the entertainment industry, along with issues regarding what’s actually sexy (Noni Jean is frequently kitted out in teensy costumes that make record execs happy, while diminishing her own humanity with every stitch), deep issues that are lovingly cradled by full-scale love story. When the pair finally give into their obvious attraction, “Beyond the Lights” pulls out the big guns, all gauzy love scenes and one particularly hot trip to Mexico, but the film maintains its sensuality by remembering that nothing is so sexy as mutual respect and admiration. -Ke

19. “In the Mood for Love” (2000)

Every Wong Kar-wai movie contains a kind of visual sensuality in every frame, but “In the Mood for Love” goes one step further — its slow-burning romance between a pair of would-be lovers who live across the hall from each other in sixties-era Hong Kong is rich with unobtainable desire. Much is left unsaid and unachieved about the fantasy of an extramarital affair shared by Chow Mo-wan (Tony Leung) and Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung), but the hints of attraction between them, unfolding in small gestures and passing glances, imbues each scene with the intensity of emotions specific to a period of repression. It’s a grand tragedy of issed opportunities framed by erotic implications. —Eric Kohn

18. “Ex Machina” (2014)

If you like high-tech voyeurism and intellectual sparring, you might find Alex Garland’s cerebral sci-fi thriller unearthing some hidden desires. An affable young programmer, Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), is invited to the secluded jungle home of the CEO of his company, Nathan (Oscar Isaac) to participate in a top-secret experiment. Nathan wants to know if the cyborg he has been developing, Ava (Alicia Vikander) can convince Caleb that she has real consciousness. The tension is ripe between Nathan and Caleb as each attempts to alternately impress and control the other, but it is Caleb’s obsession with saving Ava that raises questions about the hero myth. Ava is the embodiment of male fantasy, trapped within a body invented to please and serve. As the two men fight over who best understands her mind, it turns out Ava was pulling the strings all along. There’s nothing sexier than a woman in charge. -Jd

17. “Quills” (2000)

It’s easy enough to get sucked into “Quills” based on the promise of Joaquin Phoenix playing an earnest (and incredibly sexy) young priest tempted by his attraction to a chambermaid. But somehow, much like Kate Winslet’s Madeline, we fall under the spell of the charismatic Geoffrey Rush, who plays his role as the Marquis de Sade with a deliciously dirty panache befitting the notorious French writer. The Marquis’ libertine ways run counter to the no-nonsense Royer-Collard (Michael Caine), who takes over the asylum with the intention of stifling the writer’s creative output. But even his own wife is no match for the words of the Marquis, which ooze both sensuality and liberty. Before long, any initial apprehension to the Marquis de Sade (he is a dirty old man, after all) is fully given over to the hope that his debauchery will win out, and that his desire, as well as that of Madeline and Coulmier (Phoenix) will be fully fulfilled — even though we know this is impossible. -Jr

16. “A Bigger Splash” (2015)

Watching “A Bigger Splash” feels like observing a sizzling chess game of attraction. Luca Guadagnino sticks Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Matthias Schoenaerts, and Dakota Johnson on the world’s most gorgeous island and lets the sparks fly. Swinton plays a world-famous rock singer vacationing with her lover, a chiseled Schoenaerts who is practically a walking and talking sculpture of male beauty. Their time together is disrupted by the arrival of the rocker’s former lover and his daughter, a promiscuous young 22-year-old. Each character is so ready to succumb to sexual desire and so pent up with sexual attraction that Guadagnino creates the ultimate emotional orgy. The fun is in seeing how each person uses their sexuality to outsmart the next. You’ll be seduced from the first frame to the last. It feels like you’re watching each actor for the very first time. -Zs

On the next page: wild adventures in Florida, some of the century’s most jaw-dropping pairings, and at least one murder.

Related storiesAbdellatif Kechiche is Auctioning Off 'Blue is the Warmest Color' Palme d'Or to Finance New FilmNetflix's New Ratings System Is a Terrible Idea13 Essential Lgbt Indies From the Post-'Brokeback Mountain' Era
See full article at Indiewire »

More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
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8 Great Foreign Action Films Streaming on Netflix

8 Great Foreign Action Films Streaming on Netflix
Subscription streaming services require digging to discover their full value. For example, while I’ve been prepping for IndieWire’s Best Action Films of the 21st Century (coming later this week), I was pleasantly surprised to find how many quality action films were available on Netflix — including works by a number of non-American auteurs. From martial arts to gangster shoot ’em ups to comedy-action films, here are eight highly original, well crafted, director-driven pieces of entertainment that could serve as a welcome alternative this summer when your local cineplex feels like a boring rerun.

Shaolin Soccer” (2001)

Stephen Chow’s films (“Kung Fu Hustle”) are a wonderful and loony mix of comedy and action that have an infectious spirit. For this film the actor/writer/director adds a sports movie to the mix, which might sound bizarre, but once seeing it you’ll wonder why no one has made a martial arts soccer film before.
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7 Classic Anime That Hollywood Should Remake After ‘Ghost in the Shell’ (And One That They Really Need to Leave Alone)

7 Classic Anime That Hollywood Should Remake After ‘Ghost in the Shell’ (And One That They Really Need to Leave Alone)
It was always only a matter of time until modern Hollywood resigned itself to remaking anime. Which isn’t to suggest that the uniquely Japanese medium is somehow unworthy of being used as fodder for Western blockbusters — on the contrary, anime has provided some of the most progressive, adventurous, and visionary filmmaking of the last 30 years — but rather to acknowledge the palpable whiff of inevitability with which Paramount is releasing “Ghost in the Shell.”

It’s not like studio executives are obsessive fans of the franchise, it’s not like former Paramount CEO Brad Grey bought every new DVD of “Stand Alone Complex” as it was released in the United States and can walk you through every detail of the Laughing Man case, it’s not like the people in power were just patiently waiting for the entertainment climate to warm up to the idea of a star-studded Major Kusanagi
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Filmart: How 'Days of Being Wild' Gave Birth to the Wong Kar Wai We Know

Filmart: How 'Days of Being Wild' Gave Birth to the Wong Kar Wai We Know
Purely from a business perspective, Wong Kar Wai’s Days of Being Wild wasn’t quite the hit people expected it would be when it was released in Hong Kong in December 1990.

With some of the hottest Cantopop stars and actors — including the late Leslie Cheung in the lead alongside Carina Lau, Maggie Cheung, Andy Lau and, in that famously enigmatic final scene, Tony Leung — in the cast, the expectation was that the film would be huge. But perhaps the people crunching the numbers hadn’t quite expected a feature so liberated from the constraints of traditional storytelling, a collage...
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Interview: Writer/Director Olivier Assayas on Exploring the Supernatural with Kristen Stewart for Personal Shopper

Out in limited theaters today is writer/director Olivier Assayas’ atmospheric supernatural thriller, Personal Shopper, which stars Kristen Stewart and celebrated its premiere last year during the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. The film follows Stewart’s character, Maureen, as she navigates her way through the demands of her high-pressure profession—assistant to a well-known actress—all while coping with the lingering grief over the recent death of her twin brother.

Daily Dead recently had the opportunity to speak with Assayas, who discussed his unconventional approach to the story of Personal Shopper, how much he enjoys collaborating with Stewart (they also worked together on the 2014 drama Clouds of Sils Maria), and why he wanted to explore the idea of the afterlife in his latest project. Look for Personal Shopper in select theaters, courtesy of IFC Films.

Congratulations on the film. I've been a big fan of Kristen's for quite a while, and
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