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‘Hunting Season’ Takes Top Prize at Macao Festival

‘Hunting Season’ Takes Top Prize at Macao Festival
Hunting Season,” by Argentinian first-time feature director Natalia Garagiola was named as best film at the International Film Festival and Awards Macao. France’s Xavier Legrand was named best director for domestic terrorism thriller “Custody.”

Prizes were handed out Thursday evening at Macau’s Cultural Centre, in front of a crowd that mixed local dignitaries, Hong Kong movie folk and a high-profile international contingent of film makers, industry executives, and festival programmers.

The prizes were decided on by a jury headed by France’s Laurent Cantet. The judging panel also included actress Joan Chen, writer-director Joan Chen, novelist Lawrence Osborne, and director Royston Tan.

The jury chose “Hunting Season” for its “fluid style and construction… the precision of its directing .. and for the quality of its acting,” Cantet said. “The film deals with subjects both difficult and delicate : mourning for a mother’s death, the reconciliation between estranged fathers and sons, the loneliness
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fizzy Opening Ceremony Marks Second Edition of Macao Festival & Awards

Fizzy Opening Ceremony Marks Second Edition of Macao Festival & Awards
Jeremy Renner and Hong Kong star Myriam Yeung were on hand Friday to add a touch of glamour to the opening of the 2nd International Film Festival and Awards.

The festival is an ambitious attempt to put Macau, a former Portuguese colony, now a Special Administrative Area belonging to China and renown for its casinos, on the cultural map.

Under the artistic direction of Mike Goodridge, a former journalist and film executive, the festival is a carefully-balanced mix of accessible, audience-friendly features along with art-house titles that have stood out on the festival circuit in the last few months. Its modest 48-film selection keeps the event on a human scale and allows guests to quickly mingle.

The ceremony had the great virtue of addressing all the traditional Asian touch points of a festival – prominence for local officials, a formal gong ceremony, and a parade of celebrities – but also keeping things moving swiftly without lengthy speeches. Renner, sporting
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Iffam: Festival Jurors Put Focus on Asian Experience

Iffam: Festival Jurors Put Focus on Asian Experience
Asia was understandably the focus of the competition jury at the debut of the 2nd International Film Festival and Awards Macao (Iffam). Addressing a press conference chaired by Iffam artistic director Mike Goodridge, jury president, French filmmaker Laurent Cantet said that he walked for a few hours once he reached Macau, trying unsuccessfully to get lost.

“I like to film away from my country,” said Cantet, winner of the 2008 Palme d’Or for “The Class.” “The distance it gives to your point of view is interesting.” Cantet has filmed in Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Corsica, besides his native France.

Singaporean filmmaker, Royston Tan (“15: The Movie,” “881”) suggested that the establishment of a residency program in Macau would help filmmakers from around the world to get to know the place and the culture.

British author Lawrence Osborne, whose 2014 novel “The Ballad of a Small Player” is set in the casinos of Macau, is fascinated
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Macao Festival Targets Growth With Lively Program Including ‘Paddington 2’

Macao Festival Targets Growth With Lively Program Including ‘Paddington 2’
Opening a film festival with a movie as broad as “Paddington 2” is bold move and, in the case of the Intl. Film Festival & Awards Macao, was a carefully calculated decision. It suggests that commercial films can have artistic merit, and signals that Macao, in its second year of existence and first under a new director, intends to be audience friendly as well as smart.

“It is a delightful, five-star film for audiences of all ages. It makes for a playful opening that says: ‘Let’s have some fun before we get down to the serious business,’” says Mike Goodridge, who was appointed as the festival’s artistic director over the summer. “Unlike Hong Kong, just across the river, Macau doesn’t have a strong arthouse tradition. We are going to have to build audiences.”

To that end, Goodridge, who officially took up his position only in September, has been busily pounding the pavements in Macau and meeting
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series
Twin Peaks” finally introduced fans to Diane, the oft-named but never seen secretary whom FBI Agent Cooper addressed his recordings to in the original 1990s series: David Lynch saved the plum role for one of his favorite actresses, Laura Dern, and her performance has been nothing short of thrilling and moving. Apart from the performance though, the character’s striking style is Orientalist, using Eastern images and themes to evoke a sense of exoticism.

Not much was known about Diane to begin with, since Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) only ever left recordings for her. It was a one-way exchange that left viewers in the dark. In “The Autobiography of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes” written by series co-creator Mark Frost, Cooper offers the only real description of Diane:

“I have been assigned a secretary. Her name is Diane. Believe her experience will be a great help. She seems an interesting cross between a saint and a cabaret singer.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ and David Lynch’s Love of the Color Red

That summary of the off-screen, off-page character only added more to her air of mystery. Therefore, when we finally meet Dern as Diane, the impact is pronounced, with her striking and unusual appearance: The sleek, platinum blonde bob, the multicolored fingernails that coordinate with her ensemble, and those clothes. The glimpse of each of the three outfits that Diane has worn thus far are showstoppers. They also have a strong Eastern influence in their design.

Diane’s initial look can only be seen from the bust upwards, but its heavy and ornate gold embroidery is Eastern-inflected, and her haircut super-straight styling with heavy bangs is reminiscent of how Asians have been depicted in the past, such as with actress Anna May Wong. While this first glimpse at Diane in Episode 6 isn’t enough to tell her overall aesthetic, Episode 7 certainly gives a clearer idea of her taste.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990

When Agents Rosenfield and Cole (Miguel Ferrer, David Lynch) visit Diane’s home, she enters the room in a red, silky, kimono-style robe. At that point, the Asian influences cannot be ignored, especially once you add in her home’s decor. A glance around Diane’s house confirms a mix of mid-century modern and Asian pieces ranging from multi-panel screens/room dividers, vases, decorative cranes and black lacquer objects accented with mother of pearl. Even her third outfit, a red and black leather number shows samurai inspirations that gives the illusion of criss-cross styling and a gathered waist.

Diane’s tastes and styling aren’t the most racist or even overt example of Orientalism on the show, but the series does assign its characters quirks that are often the marks of marginalized people. For example, many characters have some sort of physical disability like an eye patch or hearing loss. Making that the most identifiable mark of their characters creates a vicious cycle of reinforcing the perception of their marginalized status: Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) isn’t described as the woman whose husband is in love with another woman, but as the kook with the eyepatch. Meanwhile, in the current season, the only Asian character is Naido (Nae Yuuki), the woman without eyes who doesn’t speak in the Purple Room.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past

Diane’s bold style is used to emphasize her strong personality (“Fuck you, Tammy”) but also her mysterious, exotic qualities that Cooper had tried to encapsulate in his description. Therefore, the Asian trappings are used as costuming and Otherizing to show how interesting and unusual she is. While this practice of using Eastern clothes as costumes was far more prevalent in the past, it still shows up in properties such as “Star Wars” (Princess Amidala’s costumes are very ceremonial Asian, down to the makeup) or critical favorite “Pushing Daisies.”

The Orientalism on “Twin Peaks” was far more pronounced when the show first aired in the 1990s. Although Agent Cooper was a white man teaching Eastern philosophy to solve crimes and Josie Packard (Joan Chen) fulfilled the stereotype of the Asian seductress, the worst affront came in Season 2. Josie’s sister-in-law Catherine Martell for some reason appeared in yellowface for several episodes as a businessman named Mr. Tojamura who sported a samurai hairstyle, spoke in a stereotypical accent and even invoked the bombing of Nagasaki in a conversation. Take a look at that trainwreck below:

Twin Peaks” has come a long way when it comes to its depiction of Eastern cultures as merely costume or lesser-than. Sadly, it seems to have doubled-down on its brutality towards and objectification of women. But more on that later.

Twin Peaks” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related storiesBen Stiller Explains the Importance of Celebrating Human Stories that 'Don't Center on Aliens or Robots' -- Nantucket Film Festival'Twin Peaks' Hints at Both Diane's Traumatic Past and Audrey Horne's Fate'Twin Peaks' Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series
Twin Peaks” finally introduced fans to Diane, the oft-named but never seen secretary whom FBI Agent Cooper addressed his recordings to in the original 1990s series: David Lynch saved the plum role for one of his favorite actresses, Laura Dern, and her performance has been nothing short of thrilling and moving. Apart from the performance though, the character’s striking style is Orientalist, using Eastern images and themes to evoke a sense of exoticism.

Not much was known about Diane to begin with, since Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) only ever left recordings for her. It was a one-way exchange that left viewers in the dark. In “The Autobiography of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes” written by series co-creator Mark Frost, Cooper offers the only real description of Diane:

“I have been assigned a secretary. Her name is Diane. Believe her experience will be a great help. She seems an interesting cross between a saint and a cabaret singer.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ and David Lynch’s Love of the Color Red

That summary of the off-screen, off-page character only added more to her air of mystery. Therefore, when we finally meet Dern as Diane, the impact is pronounced, with her striking and unusual appearance: The sleek, platinum blonde bob, the multicolored fingernails that coordinate with her ensemble, and those clothes. The glimpse of each of the three outfits that Diane has worn thus far are showstoppers. They also have a strong Eastern influence in their design.

Diane’s initial look can only be seen from the bust upwards, but its heavy and ornate gold embroidery is Eastern-inflected, and her haircut super-straight styling with heavy bangs is reminiscent of how Asians have been depicted in the past, such as with actress Anna May Wong. While this first glimpse at Diane in Episode 6 isn’t enough to tell her overall aesthetic, Episode 7 certainly gives a clearer idea of her taste.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990

When Agents Rosenfield and Cole (Miguel Ferrer, David Lynch) visit Diane’s home, she enters the room in a red, silky, kimono-style robe. At that point, the Asian influences cannot be ignored, especially once you add in her home’s decor. A glance around Diane’s house confirms a mix of mid-century modern and Asian pieces ranging from multi-panel screens/room dividers, vases, decorative cranes and black lacquer objects accented with mother of pearl. Even her third outfit, a red and black leather number shows samurai inspirations that gives the illusion of criss-cross styling and a gathered waist.

Diane’s tastes and styling aren’t the most racist or even overt example of Orientalism on the show, but the series does assign its characters quirks that are often the marks of marginalized people. For example, many characters have some sort of physical disability like an eye patch or hearing loss. Making that the most identifiable mark of their characters creates a vicious cycle of reinforcing the perception of their marginalized status: Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) isn’t described as the woman whose husband is in love with another woman, but as the kook with the eyepatch. Meanwhile, in the current season, the only Asian character is Naido (Nae Yuuki), the woman without eyes who doesn’t speak in the Purple Room.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past

Diane’s bold style is used to emphasize her strong personality (“Fuck you, Tammy”) but also her mysterious, exotic qualities that Cooper had tried to encapsulate in his description. Therefore, the Asian trappings are used as costuming and Otherizing to show how interesting and unusual she is. While this practice of using Eastern clothes as costumes was far more prevalent in the past, it still shows up in properties such as “Star Wars” (Princess Amidala’s costumes are very ceremonial Asian, down to the makeup) or critical favorite “Pushing Daisies.”

The Orientalism on “Twin Peaks” was far more pronounced when the show first aired in the 1990s. Although Agent Cooper was a white man teaching Eastern philosophy to solve crimes and Josie Packard (Joan Chen) fulfilled the stereotype of the Asian seductress, the worst affront came in Season 2. Josie’s sister-in-law Catherine Martell for some reason appeared in yellowface for several episodes as a businessman named Mr. Tojamura who sported a samurai hairstyle, spoke in a stereotypical accent and even invoked the bombing of Nagasaki in a conversation. Take a look at that trainwreck below:

Twin Peaks” has come a long way when it comes to its depiction of Eastern cultures as merely costume or lesser-than. Sadly, it seems to have doubled-down on its brutality towards and objectification of women. But more on that later.

Twin Peaks” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related storiesWhy Ben Stiller Put His Comedy Career On Hold After 'Zoolander 2''Twin Peaks' Hints at Both Diane's Traumatic Past and Audrey Horne's Fate'Twin Peaks' Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’: Why It Shouldn’t Have Changed Its Opening Titles

‘Twin Peaks’: Why It Shouldn’t Have Changed Its Opening Titles
There’s more than a few cast members from the original “Twin Peaks” who did not return for the latest batch of episodes that dropped late Sunday night. Some have retired from acting, while a number of others are memorialized in the episodes’ closing scrolls.

But there’s one non-holdover from the original “Twin Peaks” run that might indicate the biggest change in what the show has become: the opening credits bird.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Bible: Here’s IndieWire’s Full Coverage of the David Lynch Revival

When Showtime unveiled the first look at the opening credits, gone was the unassuming footage of a quiet Washington logging town, replaced by a more overtly ominous intro. While the updated opening credits prime the audience for an aggressively weirder spin on this otherworldly murder mystery, it loses some of the subtle punch and the humble, twisted-fairytale rhythms that used to kick off each installment.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’: Where Food Is a Signifier of Virtue, and Only Heroes Deserve Pie

‘Twin Peaks’: Where Food Is a Signifier of Virtue, and Only Heroes Deserve Pie
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first four episodes of Showtime’s “Twin Peaks.”]

Much is made of the joy that pie and donuts and coffee bring to the characters on “Twin Peaks.” In the original series, Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) went into raptures over the “damn fine coffee” at the Great Northern Hotel’s restaurant and declared the cherry pie at the Double R Diner was so good it could “kill ya.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: A Guide to Returned Characters and How They’re Helping Cooper – Parts 1 & 2

Cooper’s obsession with the town’s cuisine could be interpreted as an appreciation of life’s simple pleasures or merely as an extension of series co-creator David Lynch’s love of food. After all, the director notoriously once used a cow as part of an Oscar campaign stunt because without milk, “Inland Empire” would never have been made, since Lynch had eaten a lot of cheese while making the film. And
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: Where Food Is a Signifier of Virtue, and Only Heroes Deserve Pie

‘Twin Peaks’: Where Food Is a Signifier of Virtue, and Only Heroes Deserve Pie
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first four episodes of Showtime’s “Twin Peaks.”]

Much is made of the joy that pie and donuts and coffee bring to the characters on “Twin Peaks.” In the original series, Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) went into raptures over the “damn fine coffee” at the Great Northern Hotel’s restaurant and declared the cherry pie at the Double R Diner was so good it could “kill ya.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: A Guide to Returned Characters and How They’re Helping Cooper – Parts 1 & 2

Cooper’s obsession with the town’s cuisine could be interpreted as an appreciation of life’s simple pleasures or merely as an extension of series co-creator David Lynch’s love of food. After all, the director notoriously once used a cow as part of an Oscar campaign stunt because without milk, “Inland Empire” would never have been made, since Lynch had eaten a lot of cheese while making the film. And
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’: Former Series Star Joan Chen Pitches Her Character’s Wild Return to David Lynch

‘Twin Peaks’: Former Series Star Joan Chen Pitches Her Character’s Wild Return to David Lynch
David Lynch’s wildly anticipated “Twin Peaks” revival is kitted out with plenty of talented faces — over 200, both old and new — but there’s still a handful of original stars who were not tapped to return for the Showtime series. One of them is Joan Chen, who played Josie Packard during the show’s original run (and, incidentally, was the very first face to appear in the series’ very first episode, way back in 1990).

Chen, however, is eager to change that, and The Hollywood Reporter shares a compelling — and kind of wild — letter from the actress that she sent to Lynch, asking for her role to be reprised. Given that Chen’s character ended her “Twin Peaks” run as a drawer knob, it’s obviously written from a unique perspective.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Guide to Returning Characters and How They’re Helping – or Hurting – Cooper: Parts 1 & 2 (An Ongoing List)

“Dear David,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: Former Series Star Joan Chen Pitches Her Character’s Wild Return to David Lynch

‘Twin Peaks’: Former Series Star Joan Chen Pitches Her Character’s Wild Return to David Lynch
David Lynch’s wildly anticipated “Twin Peaks” revival is kitted out with plenty of talented faces — over 200, both old and new — but there’s still a handful of original stars who were not tapped to return for the Showtime series. One of them is Joan Chen, who played Josie Packard during the show’s original run (and, incidentally, was the very first face to appear in the series’ very first episode, way back in 1990).

Chen, however, is eager to change that, and The Hollywood Reporter shares a compelling — and kind of wild — letter from the actress that she sent to Lynch, asking for her role to be reprised. Given that Chen’s character ended her “Twin Peaks” run as a drawer knob, it’s obviously written from a unique perspective.

“Dear David,
See full article at Indiewire »

'Twin Peaks': Read Joan Chen's Pitch to David Lynch to Bring Back Josie (Exclusive)

Believe it or not, more than 200 actors are set to appear in the new Twin Peaks, including several familiar faces from the original run of the show. But there's one star who won't be back for the Showtime revival: Joan Chen — and she would like to change that.

Chen was one of the original stars of David Lynch's and Mark Frost's Twin Peaks, in which she appeared as Josie Packard, the unassuming Packard Sawmill owner who was involved in her own share of deadly secrets. Throughout her time on the show, Josie crossed paths...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

The Scariest Scenes in TV History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Scariest Scenes in TV History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the scariest moment or scene on TV?

Ben Travers (@BenTTravers), IndieWire

Though there are moments within “Penny Dreadful” (the seance) and “The X-Files” (“Home”) that left me spooked, the title for scariest TV scene has to go to the only show to give me nightmares — actual, legitimate nightmares. After watching the first two episodes of “Hannibal,” I woke up in the middle of the night, drenched in sweat and haunted by a bright red room with blood running down the walls — twice! Two weeks in a row, “Hannibal” ruined my peaceful slumber, and I had to stop watching the show live (and during the night entirely). Each week,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’ Premiere Ratings: Showtime’s Revival Opens Low In Initial Linear Numbers

‘Twin Peaks’ Premiere Ratings: Showtime’s Revival Opens Low In Initial Linear Numbers
The linear ratings for “Twin Peaks” are in, and at first glance it’s not the phenomenon that Showtime was bracing for.

The return of the David Lynch drama netted 506,000 viewers in its initial premiere on Showtime, as reported by Deadline. That number is expected to jump once streaming and time-shifted data is included.

Showtime insiders noted that traditionally “over 75%” of its audience watches on delay, and that the Twin Peaks two-part premiere has already averaged over 1.1 million viewers on Sunday – 626,000 viewers on-air Sunday and 450,000 from on-demand/streaming. (That doesn’t include viewership for parts three and four, online now.) Live + 3 time-shifted data will be available on Friday.

At this point, it’s not clear whether the two-hour “Twin Peaks” premiere will beat “Billions” for the best debut ever for a Showtime original series. That show averaged nearly 3 million viewers across platforms (including 1.4 million viewers watching live on the network). Before “Billions,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’ Original Series in 1990: Oddball, but ‘Brilliant Television’

‘Twin Peaks’ Original Series in 1990: Oddball, but ‘Brilliant Television’
On Sunday, Showtime debuts “Twin Peaks,” a continuation of the 1990 series that is unique in TV history — the show has maintained a fan base after a quarter century, even though there were only 30 episodes, most of them low-rated.

Like the new incarnation, the original “Twin Peaks” was kept in secrecy, but media (and audience) anticipation was high. ABC premiered the two-hour pilot on April 8, 1990, and it was an immediate hit. However, the show quickly faded from view.

Even before it started, Variety predicted it would be a challenge. In a story on Feb. 28, 1990, a few weeks before the debut, Elizabeth Guider wrote that it was much hyped, but “the series represents a ratings risk: It has no big names, no car chases, no glitz, no overt sex or violence. What it does have is an offbeat intelligence at work on a very American kind of story — murder in a small town.”

Twin Peaks
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Twin Peaks': The Top 20 Characters, Ranked

[This story contains spoilers through the first two seasons of Twin Peaks, as well as the prequel film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.]

Josie Packard (Joan Chen), Doctor Jacoby (Russ Tamblyn), Ed (Everett McGill) and Norma (Peggy Lipton), Nadine (Wendy Robie) … these are but a few of the people who were tragically excluded from The Hollywood Reporter's official list of the 20 best Twin Peaks characters.

Ok, maybe it's not so tragic in the case of Nadine, but for everyone else! Our sincerest apologies. There are arguments to be made for most of the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Inside the Roller-Coaster Journey to Get David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Back on TV

Inside the Roller-Coaster Journey to Get David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Back on TV
It came to David Lynch in a flash:

A red room. A dream version of Laura Palmer. An older Special Agent Dale Cooper, silent and pensive. The Man From Another Place, speaking cryptically: “That gum you like is going to come back in style.”

It was early 1989, and Lynch was hard at work on “Twin Peaks.” He and co-creator Mark Frost were trying to meet the deadlines of ABC, the network that had commissioned a drama about love, pie and murder in a Pacific Northwest town. Lynch was under pressure to create scenes that would allow the pilot to be released as a TV movie in case it didn’t get picked up to series. But the filmmaker didn’t have any ideas for footage that could wrap up the story neatly enough to please a movie audience.

Then he walked outside during an early-evening break from editing and folded his arms on the roof of a
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer: First Look at the Return of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper — Watch

‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer: First Look at the Return of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper — Watch
After the recent news that the “Twin Peaks” revival has finally landed a premiere date, we now have our first real look at the show’s long-awaited return — and it’s every bit as off-kilter and enigmatic as you’d imagine. Watch the teaser below, featuring a glimpse of Kyle MacLachlan reprising his role as FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Hints What Laura Palmer Has to Do With the Showtime Revival

David Lynch (and, by extension, Mark Frost) has been characteristically tight-lipped about what this upcoming batch of episodes — the first since “Twin Peaks” was canceled after its disappointing second season in 1991 — will entail, making this new footage our first substantive indication of what to expect. Not seen here, unfortunately, are all the original cast members who are still with us but not involved in the show’s third season: Piper Laurie, Lara Flynn Boyle,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer: First Look at the Return of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer: First Look at the Return of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper — Watch
After the recent news that the “Twin Peaks” revival has finally landed a premiere date, we now have our first real look at the show’s long-awaited return — and it’s every bit as off-kilter and enigmatic as you’d imagine. Watch the teaser below, featuring a glimpse of Kyle MacLachlan reprising his role as FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Hints What Laura Palmer Has to Do With the Showtime Revival

David Lynch (and, by extension, Mark Frost) has been characteristically tight-lipped about what this upcoming batch of episodes — the first since “Twin Peaks” was canceled after its disappointing second season in 1991 — will entail, making this new footage our first substantive indication of what to expect. Not seen here, unfortunately, are all the original cast members who are still with us but not involved in the show’s third season: Piper Laurie, Lara Flynn Boyle,
See full article at Indiewire »

David Lynch talks 'Twin Peaks' at TCA event

  • ScreenDaily
David Lynch talks 'Twin Peaks' at TCA event
The elusive filmmaker and artist attended the Showtime session at the annual Television Critics Association press tour on Monday and spoke cryptically about his reboot of the beloved series.

Lynch revealed that Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost reached out to him “many years ago” and suggested a return to the creepy world they created in Washington state for ABC back in the 1990s.

“We met at Musso & Frank and talked, that’s what got us going again for this one.”

The pair worked on the script via Skype. Showtime president David Nevins said FBI Agent Dale Cooper’s return to the setting of the original series forms the backbone of the reboot.

Besides Kyle MacLachlan, returning original cast include Mädchen Amick in the role of Shelly Johnson and Kimmy Robertson as sheriff’s office receptionist Lucy Moran.

Lara Flynn Boyle and Joan Chen will not return to the 18-episode package.

Laura Dern – who starred
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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