Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 50 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

23 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D. »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

23 hours ago | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier starred as the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Nyff Sets World Premiere of Ang Lee’s ‘Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk’

22 August 2016 9:19 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The already-incredible line-up for the 2016 New York Film Festival just got even more promising. Ang Lee‘s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk will hold its world premiere at the festival on October 14th, the NY Times confirmed today. The adaptation of Ben Fountain‘s Iraq War novel, with a script by Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire), follows a teenage soldier who survives a battle in Iraq and then is brought home for a victory lap before returning.

Lee has shot the film at 120 frames per second in 4K and native 3D, giving it unprecedented clarity for a feature film, which also means the screening will be held in a relatively small 300-seat theater at AMC Lincoln Square, one of the few with the technology to present it that way. While it’s expected that this Lincoln Square theater will play the film when it arrives in theaters, it may be »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


1984: John Cassavetes' Farewell "Love Streams"

17 August 2016 8:15 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

by Bill Curran

The story of an irredeemably chaotic, forever ailed pair of siblings—Robert (John Cassavetes), a louche, bestselling (but never working) author and alcoholic, and Sarah (Gena Rowlands), his troubled, manic sister just divorced and now separated from her daughter—Love Streams doesn’t care much for a Story, capital “S”.  There is no dissolution or sea change in Cassavetes’ swan song*. If one of the chief pleasures of any good narrative is the suggestion of lives lived before and after the story itself, it’s striking to note that, unlike previous Cassavetes works like Faces and A Woman Under the Influence (with their forever altering moments), Love Streams exists on a continuum. We know Robert and Sarah will never really change. And there is a poignant resignation in realizing at the film’s end, as a thunderstorm pounds the windowpanes of Robert’s home and Sarah’s new companion’s car, »

- Bill Curran

Permalink | Report a problem


'Ask Drew' features an almost impossible 'Movie God' question this week

8 August 2016 10:10 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The Marvel vs DC rivalry curdled this year in a major way, and the stink of it has ruined 2016 as a film year for me. I enjoyed Captain America: Civil War, and I enjoyed Suicide Squad, and the mere fact that I was able to enjoy both seems to mark me as some kind of weirdo if you listen to the very loud, but thankfully very small, vocal minority who seem determined to prove to the world that if you like comic book movies, you are likely a sociopath with poor people skills. I believe better of the vast majority of you, though. I meet plenty of ardent fans who remind me every day that fandom is a community, I would love to sit out all further conversation about the topic, but I think that’s the coward’s way out. I refuse to let anyone dictate what I can »

- Drew McWeeny

Permalink | Report a problem


John Waters on ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ His Favorite Filmmakers & Why He Hasn’t Directed in More Than a Decade

1 August 2016 1:31 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

John Waters has made 16 films over the course of his nearly 50-year career, one of which has remained elusive for years: 1970’s “Multiple Maniacs.” Janus Films recently restored the cult icon’s second feature, and Waters spoke to us about the film’s re-release, the filmmakers of today he most admires and why he hasn’t directed in more than 10 years.

There’s a funny coincidence because our TV team is at the TCAs. NBC is promoting “Hairspray Live” as part of their upfronts. It’s like Must See TV for the Whole Family. Meanwhile, your “Multiple Maniacs” restoration is going to promote rosary jobs for a whole new generation. Is this your idea of a balanced life?

It is, because I felt the same thing. I did in June a thing with the Baltimore Symphony, where they do “Hairspray,” and I’m sort of like Victor Borge and I »

- Dana Harris

Permalink | Report a problem


[Review] Bad Moms

29 July 2016 1:10 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Subversive in passages, Bad Moms is a fairly paint-by-numbers affair with all the beats that years of test audiences have told Hollywood they need to include, from the protagonist trading up to the baddest of the bad moms growing to learn how to balance being both bad and good. It’s the kind of screenplay careful observers of the genre could write even before walking in the door of your local multiplex, based on recycled parts of other films. A gag involving a “mom” bra, for instance, was done just as effectively in The Boss, an earlier Kristen Bell outing from April; this time Bell watches as Kathryn Hahn critiques Mila Kunis’ “mom” bra. Both male-directed directed pictures are cynically crafted for a suburban gals night out at the local cinemas, as focus grouped and market researched as the T.G.I. Friday’s margarita I imagine this picture’s »

- John Fink

Permalink | Report a problem


Susan Seidelman Looks Back: How ‘Smithereens’ Defined Her Career – Girl Talk

28 July 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present and future.

Susan Seidelman had just completed her first feature when the Cannes Film Festival came calling. In 1982, Seidelman wasn’t yet 30; she was only a few years out of film school and had only a single feature under her belt. But that didn’t matter to the world’s most well-regarded festival. They wanted Seidelman’s “Smithereens,” and the ensuing reception for the film — a punk-infused dark comedy about the bohemian underworld of New York City featuring a not entirely likable lead character — didn’t just change Seidelman’s life; it changed the way American independent cinema was received around the world.

Smithereens,” shot guerilla-style around the city with a cast and crew made up of many of the filmmaker’s Nyu classmates, marked a sea change for Cannes: It was the first American independent feature had »

- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


Brady Corbet On His Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ And The Problem With Movies Today

21 July 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

First-time directors who swing for the fences with bold debut films can strike out hard, but actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s “The Childhood of a Leader” is connecting in a big way.

The period drama premiered at last year’s Venice Film Festival, where Corbet took home the awards for Best Debut Feature and Best Director, and is being released Friday through IFC FilmsSundance Selects label. Corbet co-wrote the screenplay for the film with his partner Mona Fastvold.

Read More: ‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

A dark, post-World War I tale about the seven-year-old son of an American diplomat in France, the film’s largely European cast includes Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”), Liam Cunningham (“Game of Thrones”) and Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac”). Robert Pattinson has a small but deceptively important role in the movie, which focuses on the young, manipulative »

- Graham Winfrey

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Video Essay Explores the Depth of Human Relationships In John Cassavetes’ ‘Gloria’

20 July 2016 9:17 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Following years of unfilled curiosity, I had the fortune of finally seeing John CassavetesGloria at Metrograph this past weekend. Many things that made the experience a surprise, and none were as strong as one-time child actor John Adames, whose central role was written as a rather precocious young child who almost exclusively speaks like an adult — a typically nauseating archetype that, when paired with a prime Gena Rowlands turn and placed under Cassavetes’ careful eye, works perfectly. Although I almost immediately knew something was different about this iteration of the type and could certainly sense something deeper at play, Gloria moves at so quick a clip that you might only be able to collect its pieces hours and days after.

Enter Adrian Martin and Cristina Álvarez López, who took to studying the film’s adult-child relationships, Cassavetes’ manipulation of perspective, and how “the mother-son figure is at once questioned, »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


Moongazing by Anne-Katrin Titze

20 July 2016 8:09 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Kyle Molzan: "If you ever meet Jerry Lewis, send him our movie!" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Georges Simenon, Charles Laughton in Burgess Meredith's The Man On The Eiffel Tower, Cédric Kahn's Red Lights (Feux Rouges) with Carole Bouquet and Jean-Pierre Darroussin, The Day The Clown Cried, Jerry Lewis, Rainer Werner Fassbinder's In A Year With 13 Moons (In Einem Jahr Mit 13 Monden), Christian Petzold's Phoenix, John Cassavetes' A Woman Under The Influence, Kurt Weill, Brian Wilson and Moonriders were unearthed in my For the Plasma conversation with co-director Kyle Molzan.

Helen (Rosalie Lowe) having a meal

Keiichi Suzuki's score informs how we meander through the landscapes filmed dream-like by Christopher Messina (Dear Renzo). Charlie (Anabelle LeMieux) arrives at a house in Maine where a pal from the past, Helen (Rosalie Lowe), has a job monitoring forest fires and where she also miraculously predicts shifts in global finance. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Fury’: Brian De Palma’s Formalist Playground

18 July 2016 11:25 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

It is either my gift or my curse — maybe both; how you end up feeling about this piece will do a lot to decide — that I have been tasked with assessing one of the Brian De Palma films towards which few feel any need to express a strong, set opinion. (The director offered this ringing assessment in Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow’s documentary: “You know, it wouldn’t necessarily be your first choice.”) “Be your own man!” you might say, which is just the thing: for as much as I enjoy his 1978 telekinesis-espionage actioner The Fury, and no matter the fact that I consider a handful of its sequences some of the very best in his oeuvre, the thing can take a bit of time to get there. But there exists a chance — a fine chance, in fact — that we may extract from its stop-start, hot-cold rhythm a further »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


Gena Rowlands on Working With John Cassavetes, Why Everyone Loves ‘The Notebook’

13 July 2016 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands are still considered the king and queen of independent cinema.

Operating outside the studio system, the husband and wife team created indelible portraits of working-class strivers and small-timers in such films as “A Woman Under the Influence,” “Gloria” and “Faces.” Those works, as well as seven others, will screen as part of a retrospective at New York’s Metrograph theater from July 15-25. The career appreciation will include such Cassavetes and Rowlands pairings as “Love Streams” and “Opening Night,” along with films that Cassavetes directed without his wife and muse, such as “A Child is Waiting” and “Husbands.”

Cassavetes died in 1989, but Rowlands has remained active, appearing on the big and small screen in the likes of “The Notebook,” “Hysterical Blindness” and “Unhook the Stars.” She spoke with Variety about Cassavetes’ legacy, how roles improved for actresses and why she loves Bette Davis.

Why do your husband’s films endure? »

- Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Drive-In Dust Offs: The Fury (1978)

2 July 2016 9:59 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

1978 cast a long shadow in the world of horror. From Dawn of the Dead to Halloween, the landscape was abundant with everything from the socially relevant to the singularly terrifying, from superior remakes (Invasion of the Body Snatchers) to quirky haunted houses (The Evil). And then there’s the red headed stepchild that no one talks about: Brian DePalma’s The Fury. Frenetic, action packed, and gruesome, The Fury never gets the love from even most DePalma fanatics. What a shame – it’s never less than entertaining, and at its best showcases the director’s mesmerizing visual touch.

Released in March by Twentieth Century Fox, The Fury made $24 million against its $5.5 million budget. That’s good green, folks, and DePalma received favorable reviews,  still basking in a critical glow left over from his previous effort, Carrie (’76). So why is it so easily dismissed, ranked along the lines of efforts like Wise Guys, »

- Scott Drebit

Permalink | Report a problem


James Victor, Cassavetes Protege and 'Zorro' Actor, Dies at 76

1 July 2016 1:53 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

James Victor, the actor best known for portraying the buffoonish Sgt. Jaime Mendoza on the popular 1990s Family Channel action-adventure series Zorro, has died. He was 76. Victor, a protege of famed independent auteur John Cassavetes, had heart disease and died June 20 in his apartment in Hollywood, his longtime friend Joe Perez told The Hollywood Reporter. Duncan Regehr starred as Don Diego de la Vega/Zorro on the Family Channel adaptation of Zorro, which aired in several countries and for three seasons (1990-93) in the U.S. At first, Victor's Mendoza, who always enjoyed a good meal, tried

read more

»

- Mike Barnes

Permalink | Report a problem


The Fury: Brian De Palma’s underrated, explosive movie

23 June 2016 8:58 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

Director Brian De Palma followed Carrie with another gory vaunt into the supernatural. Here's why The Fury deserves a revisit...

When it comes to telekinesis and gory visual effects, the movie that generally springs to mind is David Cronenberg’s 1981 exploding head opus, Scanners. But years before that, American director Brian De Palma was liberally dowsing the screen with claret in his 1976 adaptation of Carrie - still rightly regarded as one of the best Stephen King adaptations made so far. A less widely remembered supernatural film from De Palma came two years after: De Palma’s supernatural thriller, The Fury.

The Fury was made with a more generous budget than Carrie, had a starrier cast (Kirk Douglas in the lead, John Cassavetes playing the villain), and it even did pretty well in financial terms. Yet The Fury had the misfortune of being caught in a kind of pincer movement between Carrie, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Lola Kirke, Zoe Kravitz, John Cho to Star in Thriller ‘Gemini’

9 June 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lola Kirke, Zoe Kravitz and John Cho have signed on to star in Aaron Katz’s Los Angeles-set thriller “Gemini.”

Producers are Mynette Louie, Sara Murphy and Adele Romanski with Rough House Pictures executive producing. Principal photography has commenced in Los Angeles.

The cast includes Ricki Lake, Greta Lee (“Girls”), Michelle Forbes (“The Killing”), Nelson Franklin (“Veep”), Reeve Carney (“Penny Dreadful”), Jessica Parker Kennedy (“Black Sails”) and James Ransone (“Tangerine”). Plot details are under wraps.

ICM Partners is representing domestic rights.

“Gemini” is Katz’s fifth feature as a writer-director. He previously co-wrote and co-directed “Land Ho!” with Martha Stephens, which premiered at Sundance 2014, was released by Sony Pictures Classics and won the 2015 Independent Spirit John Cassavetes Award. Katz also directed “Cold Weather,” “Quiet City” and “Dance Party, USA.”

Kirke stars in Amazon’s “Mozart in the Jungle” with feature credits on “Mistress America” and “Gone Girl.” Kravitz’s credits include the “Divergent” movies, »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs Restored by The Criterion Collection and Janus Films

8 June 2016 2:20 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Photo by Lawrence Irvine

The folks at Janus Films and the Criterion Collection have just sent out the announcement that they’ll screen a restored print of John Waters’ 1970 film Multiple Maniacs at the Provincetown Film Festival on June 17th, with a national roll-out this August.

“Restoration is an amazing thing. Finally, Multiple Maniacs looks like a bad John Cassavetes film! I couldn’t be more thrilled!”

John Waters

We saw John Waters stop by the Criterion offices back on November 18th, 2015.

The moment we've all been waiting for.

A photo posted by Criterion Collection (@criterioncollection) on Nov 18, 2015 at 12:16pm Pst

First Preview at the Provincetown Film Festival

Theatrical Premiere in NY August 5 at the IFC Center

National Release To Follow

Provincetown Int’L Ff Screening:

Fri. 6/17 at 10:00pm – Art House 2

214 Commercial Street

John Waters’s gloriously grotesque and extremely hard to see second feature comes to theaters at long last, »

- Ryan Gallagher

Permalink | Report a problem


Best Military Movies To Watch on June 6, D-Day

6 June 2016 3:44 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

June 6, 1944. Today marks the 72nd anniversary of D-Day.

On June 7th, Paramount Home Media Distribution will release director Michael Bay’s remarkable 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers Of Benghazi.

Hailed as “powerful” (Kyle Smith, New York Post), “engrossing” (Soren Andersen, Seattle Times) and “full of explosive action” (Dan Casey, Nerdist), the film arrives on Blu-ray Combo Pack, DVD and On Demand this Tuesday. (Review)

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers Of Benghazi tells the incredible true story of six elite ex-military operators who fought to protect the CIA against overwhelming odds when terrorists attacked a U.S. diplomatic compound on September 11, 2012. The film stars John Krasinski (TV’s “The Office”), James Badge Dale (World War Z) and Pablo Schreiber (TV’s “Orange is the New Black”), and is based on the nonfiction novel 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi by New York Times best-selling author Mitchell Zuckoff with »

- Movie Geeks

Permalink | Report a problem


Crime and Punishment on the L.A. Freeways: John Cassavetes Drives

31 May 2016 9:34 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Here’s a trippy short video found via the Vintage Los Angeles Facebook page, an excerpt from the 1968 French documentary, Cineaste de notre temps (1968). Shot three years earlier, it’s just John Cassavetes driving home as a French interviewer peppers him with questions he mostly nonchalantly (and most likely post-synced) answers. Not enough people in L.A. — “living by appointment,” he says. He also announces a project: Crime and Punishment as a musical. The Beach Boys play on the soundtrack. »

- Scott Macaulay

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 50 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners