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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 121 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Metrodome strikes for Toronto trio

15 September 2014 3:10 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Mia Hansen Love, Francois Ozon dramas and Cannon Films doc among Toronto haul.

UK distributor Metrodome has secured UK and Ireland rights to a trio of films that played at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival (Sept 4-14): Mia Hansen Love’s well-received drama Eden, Francois Ozon’s The New Girlfriend and documentary Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films.

All three will play at the London Film Festival (Oct 8-19).

Metrodome acquired Eden from sales agent Kinology in a deal negotiated by Metrodome head of acquisitions Giles Edwards and Kinology’s CEO Grégoire Melin.

Directed by French auteur Mia Hansen Love and starring Felix De Givry, Pauline Etienne and Greta Gerwig, Eden charts the rise and fall of one of the DJs who pioneered the French electro music scene in the 1990s.

The film features cameo’s from the likes of Daft Punk, Joe Smooth, the late Frankie Knuckles »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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At the Devil’s Door | Review

10 September 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Devil in Disguise: McCarthy’s Latest an Unnerving Indie Horror Film

Every now and then, a horror film comes along that’s reminiscent of a certain heyday in the genre, when understated supernatural elements were used to unnerving effect and not overwhelmed by comedic flourishes or found footage gimmickry. With his sophomore film, At the Devil’s Door (initially titled Home at its premiere at the 2014 SXSW Film Festival), Nicholas McCarthy manages to create an unsettling environment that’s most startling for a certain level of unpredictability. While some uneven plotting and awkward moments in character development mar the process, this is an illustrative example of how capably creepy independent American horror films still have the potential to be.

A teenage girl (Ashley Rickards) is convinced by her new boyfriend to sell her soul, which she seems to do willingly, not quite sure her visit to a remote trailer where »

- Nicholas Bell

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Toronto Film Review: ‘Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films’

8 September 2014 5:39 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

For the second time in a year, the meteoric rise and ignominious demise of 1980s schlock juggernaut Cannon Films comes to the screen in feature-length documentary form. But where Cannon is concerned, a twice-told tale is no vexation for the weary cinephile’s ear. Faster, sleeker and more out-of-control (in a good way) than its Cannes-premiered predecessor (Israeli director Hila Medalia’s “The Go-Go Boys”), Mark Hartley’s “Electric Boogaloo” — actors, writers, directors, editors and studio execs who, if anything, seem emboldened by the lack of Golan and Globus’s official participation in the project. Sure to be a fest favorite, Hartley’s docu should also spur much Cannon revivalism on the repertory and cinematheque circuits.

Cannon is irresistible fodder for Hartley, whose previous cinephile docus “Not Quite Hollywood” (2008) and “Machete Maidens Unleashed!” (2010) showed he was drawn to exploitation movies like Charles Bronson to a pack of street thugs. Like those films, »

- Scott Foundas

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Venice: Q And A With Saverio Costanzo, Director Of Adam Driver-Starrer ‘Hungry Hearts’

1 September 2014 1:26 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Italian director Saverio Costanzo broke out internationally in 2004 with “Private,” which was set in a Palestinian home in an occupied zone. “Hungry Hearts,” his fourth feature, in competition at Venice and also screening in Toronto, is instead set in New York where Jude (Adam Driver) and Mina (Alba Rohrwacher) fall in love and have a child whom Mina wants to protect from the outside world and its contamination through a nutritional regiment that puts his life in danger. Costanzo spoke about “Hungry Hearts,” a rare case of an Italian pic with a New York indie feel, with Variety’s Nick Vivarelli.

Excerpts.

Q:The book is set in Italy, why did you transpose it to the Upper West Side?

A: It seemed impossible for me to set it in Italy. Italian cities are not as violent, but also not as powerful as New York. And the whole food disorder issue: ‘where »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Rosemary’s Baby (1968) review

27 August 2014 11:32 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

Reviewed by Grace Fontaine, MoreHorror.com

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Starring: Mia Farrow (Rosemary Woodhouse), John Cassavetes (Guy Woodhouse), Ruth Gordon (Minnie Castevet), Sidney Blackmer (Roman Castevet), Ralph Bellamy (Abe Sapirstein) and Clay Tanner (Satan)

Warning: I would not recommend watching this if you are pregnant, ladies.

“Rosemary’s Baby” does not thrive on eliciting base, violent terror upon its viewers, the aims it has is far sinister- it wants to put you off balance and keep you there.

Young newlyweds Rosemary and Guy Woodhouse have picked up sticks and set down in a grand yet somewhat ancient apartment building smack bang in the middle of cosmopolitan New York City. Rosemary is a clever yet naïve housewife who is quite content to be a homebody while Guy is a struggling actor who is desperate to make it big in the Big Apple. Although the couple share a loving and playful relationship, »

- admin

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Interview: Director Ira Sachs Reminds Us ‘Love is Strange’

27 August 2014 5:40 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – One of the notable films to kick off the autumn film season is writer/director Ira Sach’s “Love is Strange.” The story of two men in a longtime gay relationship, who finally can marry – but whose lives go off track unexpectedly – features brilliant performances from veterans John LIthgow and Alfred Molina.

Ira Sachs is a veteran writer and director himself, on his sixth feature film. He first got noticed with “Forty Shades of Blue” in 2005 and “Married Life” two years later. The latter film featured Chris Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Pierce Brosnan. After some great reviews for his fifth film “Keep the Lights On” (2012), he is back with “Love is Strange,” a personal and subtle character driven story.

Ira Sachs (center) with Leading Men Alfred Molina and John Lithgow of ‘Love is Strange

Photo credit: Sony Pictures Classics

HollywoodChicago.com sat down to interview Ira Sachs, as his »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Criterion Collection: Love Streams | Blu-ray Review

26 August 2014 10:10 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

John Cassavetes’ magnificent swan song, Love Streams receives the Criterion treatment this month, an addendum to the previously released five-title collection from the auteur. The film was surrounded and conceived amidst its own set of peculiar circumstances, and thus exhibits its own frenetic energy that sets it apart even within Cassavetes’ own oeuvre. After filming commenced, the director famously receiving a diagnosis that he would only live another six months due to cirrhosis of the liver. Unquestionably, this imbued his strange, wonderful, and reverential exploration of love’s complicated facets with a sharp melancholy. An adaptation of Ted Allan’s stage play, the film won the Golden Bear at the 1984 Berlin Film Festival, but wasn’t marketed properly and received a drowned out theatrical release. The film concerns the reunion of an estranged brother and sister, a pop writer Robert Harmon (John Cassavetes) and recent divorcee, Sarah Lawson (Gena Rowlands »

- Nicholas Bell

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Daily | #HerzogDay, Johansson, Cassavetes

22 August 2014 10:10 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

"Happy #HerzogDay!" announced the BFI this morning, and the hashtag's been a lively resource for Werner Herzog-related clips, articles, images and the occasional existential quip ever since. Also in today's roundup of news and views: Stuart Klawans on Scarlett Johansson, Durga Chew-Bose on John Cassavetes's Love Streams (1984) and Jonathan Rosenbaum on Orson Welles. And will there ultimately be a Criterion release for Richard Linklater's Boyhood? Plus, early word on Alex Ross Perry's Queen of Earth with Michelle Dockery and Elizabeth Moss. » - David Hudson »

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Moor Fear: The Making of Xmoor

21 August 2014 9:10 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg chats with writer-director Luke Hyams as well as actors Melia Kreiling and Mark Bonnar about literally get some chills shooting a horror film in Northern Ireland…

“My dad was a talented song writer and a great lover of films,” explains British independent filmmaker Luke Hyams.  “He exposed me to stuff like Alien [1979], Blade Runner [1982] and Shane [1953] when I was tiny and those films left a startling imprint. My Mum was a book dealer and had a good line in bed time stories so I think that may be where my love of story originated.”  The third instalment of the original Star Wars trilogy left a lasting impression.  “One night back in 1983 my Dad came home from the pub with a pirate copy of Return of the Jedi [1983] that changed my life. I loved the look of it, the music, the characters and could taste the finality of what »

- Trevor Hogg

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The Noteworthy: "88:88", The Films of Joaquim Pinto, Photogénie #2

20 August 2014 11:39 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Edited by Adam Cook

Above: a sneak peak of Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice, via our Tumblr. A wealth of content from the Melbourne International Film Festival's newly launched Critics Campus has been published here and here. For Rolling Stone, filmmaker James Gray writes on Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now on the occasion of its 35th anniversary: 

"The film is indeed self-consciously mythic, and with its transcendent imagery, it enters the cosmic realm. Captain Willard is an enigmatic hero, and we need the narration (written by Dispatches author Michael Herr) to help us know him. Surely the man has his dark side: he kills a wounded Vietnamese woman and hacks Colonel Kurtz to death. But by the end, Willard retains enough of his soul to protect the innocent, childlike Lance (Sam Bottoms), and here we see that the human connection endures. The film's experience expands in this moment, »

- Notebook

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The Field Guide to Netflix Canada: ‘A New Leaf’

20 August 2014 4:35 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

A New Leaf

Written by Elaine May

Directed by Elaine May

USA, 1971

Fellow Canadian cinephiles know that our local version of Netflix has a terrible wheat-to-chaff ratio. The thin library, coupled with the still-not-great Ui, makes it so that a disproportionately large amount of legwork has to be put into just browsing for movies. Then there’s what available. It’s unlikely that you’ll find a movie olden than you on the front page. This is because the collection sharply skews recent: at time of writing, approximately 0.01% of the films in the library were released before 1960. For comparison, about 58% of the films currently available were released this decade. Despite all this, though, I come here today not to bury Netflix Canada, nor to tear it a new one, but to provide fellow Canucks with a road map to navigating Netflix’s choppy waters. And with that, I welcome you »

- Derek Godin

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Daily | Gray on Coppola, Moullet on Buñuel

15 August 2014 10:14 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now turns 35 this month and James Gray (The Immigrant) has written an amazing appreciation for Rolling Stone. Also in today's roundup of news and views: Michael Ventura on John Cassavetes's Love Streams (1984), Luc Moullet on Luis Buñuel's Death in the Garden (1956), New York Times profiles of Sam Taylor-Johnson, Jennifer Yuh Nelson, Ava DuVernay, Sarah Polley, Lisa Cholodenko and Lana Wachowski, Grady Hendrix on Lee Myung-Se, Glenn Kenny and Ben Sachs on Richard Linklater, Sean Nortz on Michael Wadleigh's Wolfen (1981), Steven Shaviro on Bobcat Goldthwaite's Willow Creek (2013) and much, much more. » - David Hudson »

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Blood Ties Review

14 August 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Considering the acclaim that French director Guillaume Canet has rightly received for his previous endeavours, Tell No One and Little White Lies, it became increasingly likely that he would make the move across the Atlantic, and test his abilities in the States – a move he has now made with his first English production, Blood Ties. However here is a film overwhelmed by its influences, feeling more like a homage to the work of Sidney Lumet and John Cassavetes, rather than find its own, unique voice.

Blood Ties is a remake of the 2008 production Les Liens Du Sang – which Canet himself took s starring role in – and the director has since moved this story to New York in the 1970s, where we meet cop Frank (Billy Crudup), who unwittingly puts up his brother Chris (Clive Owen) following the latter’s release from a lengthy jail sentence. The pair have a distinct conflict of interests, »

- Stefan Pape

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New on Video: ‘Love Streams’

13 August 2014 6:11 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Love Streams

Directed by John Cassavetes

Written by Ted Allan and John Cassavetes

USA, 1984

Love Streams, John Cassavetes’ final film as an actor and penultimate film as director, is also one of his most unusual features. While his distinctive work can oftentimes be divisive, it’s easy to see how this film more than most others could be rather off-putting to those not appreciative of, or even accustomed to, his filmmaking technique.

Cassavetes adapted the film with Ted Allan, based on the latter’s play, and the film’s structure is one of the more vexing of its attributes. Dropped into two parallel lives, with little to no backstory, only gradually are we able to piece together certain details. First, there is Robert Harmon (a worn and weary Cassavetes, his failing health evident). Harmon is a writer, a drunk, and a womanizer, and he is supposedly working on a book about nightlife, »

- Jeremy Carr

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Spirit Awards sets dates

13 August 2014 4:39 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards will take place on February 21, 2015.

Film Independent President Josh Welsh announced the date on August 13 and said nominations will be unveiled on November 25.

“It’s incredible to look back at all the films and filmmakers we’ve celebrated since 1986 when the Awards began,” said Welsh.

“This year is already shaping up to be such a strong year for independent filmmakers and we look forward to recognising their work.

“Also, we are so thrilled to be back on IFC celebrating another remarkable year in independent cinema.”

The Spirit Awards include the following categories: Best Feature, Best First Feature, Best First Screenplay, Best Director, Best Screenplay, John Cassavetes Award (given to the best feature made for a budget under $500,000), Best Male Lead, Best Female Lead, Best Supporting Male, Best Supporting Female, Best Cinematography, Best Editing, Best International Film, Best Documentary and the Robert Altman Award.

The Filmmaker Grants include the Piaget Producers Award, the »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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6 Filmmaking Tips from John Cassavetes

13 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The 1980s proved a difficult time for many notable American directors of the 1960s and 70s. Sure, filmmakers like Altman and Coppola came out on the other side of the decade with renewed vigor, and at least one – Scorsese – even managed to arguably realize some of the most interesting work of his career. But for others, the 1980s were a lost and endless horizon of work that was hard to come by compounded by life circumstances that were even harder to endure. Difficult men who lived hard and felt deeply now found themselves confronted with their most profound personal and professional limitations. After trying to reform himself in the wake of drug addiction and a damaged reputation, Hal Ashby died of pancreatic cancer in December 1988. Just over a month later, renowned independent filmmaker, theater director, writer, and actor John Cassavetes passed away of cirrhosis of the liver. Cassavetes was supposed to die five years earlier, when »

- Landon Palmer

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Watch: Cassavetes Between Takes of Love Streams

12 August 2014 10:13 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

“If our films are supposed to be something like life is…then how can you determine what’s going to happen tomorrow?” That’s John Cassavetes from the set of Love Streams on the importance of surrendering to the unpredictability of filmmaking. Excerpted from the film’s on-set documentary I’m Almost Not Crazy…–John Cassavetes: The Man and His Work, this short clip provides a glimpse of Cassavetes’ ethic between takes. The full behind-the-scenes exposé is available in Criterion’s just released edition of Love Streams, and you can read Dennis Lim’s supplemental essay over at the site, which examines the film as a brilliant collision of Cassavetes’ (and Rowlands’ and […] »

- Sarah Salovaara

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Listen Up Philip | 2014 Sundance Next Review

12 August 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Philip A. Dick: Perry’s Literary Minds Stuck In a Lonely Place

Following up his dark hearted homage to road trip cinema with 2011’s The Color Wheel, Alex Ross Perry’s third film, Listen Up Philip arrives with an equally unpleasant set of main characters as it explores the hyper intellectual worldview of self-important authors wallowing in their emotional ennui. But the self-involved narcissists occupying Perry’s arena also happen to be impressively fleshed out compelling characters that makes this triptych of their miserable emotional periods so engrossing. Sprawling, unkempt, and often unlikeable, it’s one of the most impressively written and astutely performed films you’ll see this year.

We meet Philip (Jason Schwartzman) as he meets up with an ex-girlfriend for lunch, basically to gloat over his looming success as an author, celebrating the publication of his first novel. An omniscient narrator (Eric Bogosnian) begins to guide us through Philip’s (and eventually, »

- Nicholas Bell

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New on DVD Blu-ray August 12: 'Locke,' 'The Blacklist,' 'Bedknobs and Broomsticks'

11 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week

"Locke"

What's It About? Tom Hardy stars as a construction foreman who's driving to London to attend the birth of his child. You really shouldn't have stressful conversations on your cell while driving, but Ivan (Hardy) doesn't care. He has to make sure his big job tomorrow goes as planned, confess to his wife that he cheated on her with a co-worker, and coaching the aforementioned co-worker through the premature birth of their baby. Yikes.

Why We're In: Hardy is more than capable of commanding the screen for the entirety of the movie. Although you hear other characters' voices, it's all Hardy, all the time. Who could argue with that?

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week

"Love Streams" (Criterion)

What's It About? John Cassavetes and real-life wife Gena Rowlands star as siblings who turn to each other for support after being left by everyone else in their lives. »

- Jenni Miller

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Daily | Viewing and Listening

11 August 2014 7:33 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

We open today's roundup of news and views with links to video essays by Tag Gallagher, author of books on John Ford and Roberto Rosselli and move on to a collection of 80s-era profiles of great filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, Orson Welles, Francis Ford Coppola, Buster Keaton, John Cassavetes, Samuel Fuller, Woody Allen and many more. Plus, Peter Labuza talks with Gabe Klinger about Raoul Walsh, Joe Dante and, of course, the subjects of his documentary, Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater. » - David Hudson »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 121 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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