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The Garden of Allah

One of the first full Technicolor features is a romantic fantasy about an innocent beauty’s encounter with an equally innocent fugitive monk … all surrounded by sensuous, confected Hollywood exotica, courtesy of producer David O. Selznick. Marlene Dietrich and Charles Boyer steam up the screen, but dancer Tilly Losch steals the show with just one scene.

The Garden of Allah

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1936 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 79 min. / Street Date January 9, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Marlene Dietrich, Charles Boyer, Basil Rathbone, C. Aubrey Smith,

Tilly Losch, Joseph Schildkraut, John Carradine.

Cinematography: W. Howard Greene

Film Editor: Hal C. Kern

Art Directors: Edward G. Boyle, Sturges Carne, Lansing C. Holden, Lyle R. Wheeler

Original Music: Max Steiner

Written by W.P. Lipscomb, Lynn Riggs, from the novel by Robert Hichens

Produced by David O. Selznick

Directed by Richard Boleslawski

David O. Selznick’s personally produced movies combine canny commercial judgment
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns
The Western is the quintessential American movie genre. Its iconography has been seared into our collective conscious: the solitary cowboy riding the endless frontier, towns struggling to survive in a lawless land, the quick-drawing gunfighter. Generations of filmmakers have engaged with those symbols, building an entire cinematic language on a genre that began with the simple premise of good “white hats” vs. bad “black hats.” In doing so, they have created mythologies, torn down legends and subverted what it means to be an American.

My exposure to the West began in the living room of my parents’ house. My father, a Sephardic Jew born and raised in Greece, shared with me the movies he loved as a child. Over the years my enthusiasm for the genre only grew as I became a history buff, a lover of myths, and eventually a filmmaker. In interviews, I’m often asked to name my favorite Western,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cult Horror Filmmaker Ulli Lommel Has Passed Away

According to a variety of sources, including Bloody-Disgusting, famed German cult filmmaker Ulli Lommel has passed away this weekend after suffering heart failure at the age of 72.

His most well known movie is probably The Boogeyman, a 1980 supernatural horror pic starring Suzanna Love, John Carradine and Ron James. Lommel also wrote the script for the film, which follows two siblings targeted by the ghost of their mother’s boyfriend, whose soul was once imprisoned in a mirror.

The Boogeyman was a financial success and spawned two sequels. What’s most interesting, however, is that Lommel was actually working on a new TV series entitled Boogeyman Chronicles. He’d already directed the first episode, too, which is intended to air in 2018. It’s unknown how exactly it’ll fit in with the film, but there’s something exciting about revisiting old franchises and properties, especially with the original director attached.

In recent years,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Blu-ray Review – The Howling (1981)

The Howling, 1981.

Directed by Joe Dante.

Starring Dee Wallace, Christopher Stone, Patrick Macnee, Robert Picardo, Dick Miller, John Carradine, Elisabeth Brooks, Dennis Dugan, Belinda Belaski, and Kevin McCarthy.

Synopsis:

A female reporter is attacked by a notorious murderer so to get over her trauma she is sent to The Colony for relaxation. And then her problems really begin…

After meeting up with notorious killer Eddie ‘The Mangler’ Quist (Robert PicardoStar Trek: Voyager) in a dark porno theatre as part of a police sting, television reporter Karen White (Dee WallaceE.T./The Lords of Salem) starts to experience strange visions, resulting in her distancing herself from husband Bill Neill (Christopher StoneCujo) and being unable to do her job. On the advice of her doctor George Waggner (Patrick MacneeA View to a Kill), Karen and Bill are sent to The Colony, Waggner’s coastal retreat where Karen is advised
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Sentinel (1977)

  • DailyDead
In regards to his filmic output, director Michael Winner was wildly inconsistent at his worst and wholly divisive at his best (and vice versa). The remarkable thing is that those two extreme opinions can be about the same film; some find the kinetic sleaze of Death Wish (1974) powerful and disturbing, others find its ham-fisted social grazing problematic and off-putting. But it was a big hit, so naturally Universal let him ride the satanic tide with The Sentinel (1977), a Good vs. Evil, Portal to Hell potboiler that warms this Fulci-loving heart three years before Lucio even set foot in New Orleans.

Given a limited release in January stateside, The Sentinel barely broke even on its $4 million budget, and the critics hated it, deeming it lurid, reprehensible trash. Which it is; but it’s also ridiculously entertaining and has a few truly haunting moments. Turns out Winner could do horror—and yet
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: "Tobor The Great" (1954); Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

Though heavyweights Columbia and Universal produced as many serials as Republic Pictures from 1929-1956, the latter studio is generally best known for its exciting sound-era chapter-plays. Universal and the less widely known Mascot Pictures were in the game the earliest; both studios began releasing their sound serials in 1929. Mascot would only last six years or so. Universal – choosing to concentrate exclusively on the production of feature films – effectively got out of the serial business in 1946. Republic and Columbia hung on to the production of chapter-plays the longest; they released their final serials in 1955 and 1956, respectively.

Republic wasn’t only a serials factory. The studio was in the low budget feature filmmaking business as well, busily churning out a dizzying array of westerns, adventure pictures, and mysteries. They would test the box-office potentials of the horror film market during the 1940s with limited success. As a second-tier “Poverty Row” studio,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1972 / 1:85 / Street Date July 18th, 2017

Starring: Woody Allen, Gene Wilder, Tony Randall, Burt Reynolds

Cinematography: David M. Walsh

Film Editor: Eric Albertson

Written by Woody Allen

Produced by Jack Brodsky, Elliott Gould

Music: Mundell Lowe

Directed by Woody Allen

A how-to book for fledgling libertines, David Reuben’s bestselling Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) was the kind of sex manual that could remain on the coffee table when the in-laws arrived. An everyman’s guide to the birds and the bees, it ambled through its range of racy topics, from sodomy, cunnilingus to, um, plastic surgery for the genitalia, with both commonsensical and alarmingly retrograde attitudes, dispensing its advice with all the excitement of an insurance agent’s visit. When Woody Allen was given the opportunity to adapt it,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel

Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel
'The Magnificent Ambersons': Directed by Orson Welles, and starring Tim Holt (pictured), Dolores Costello (in the background), Joseph Cotten, Anne Baxter, and Agnes Moorehead, this Academy Award-nominated adaptation of Booth Tarkington's novel earned Ricardo Cortez's brother Stanley Cortez an Academy Award nomination for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White. He lost to Joseph Ruttenberg for William Wyler's blockbuster 'Mrs. Miniver.' Two years later, Cortez – along with Lee Garmes – would win Oscar statuettes for their evocative black-and-white work on John Cromwell's homefront drama 'Since You Went Away,' starring Ricardo Cortez's 'Torch Singer' leading lady, Claudette Colbert. In all, Stanley Cortez would receive cinematography credit in more than 80 films, ranging from B fare such as 'The Lady in the Morgue' and the 1940 'Margie' to Fritz Lang's 'Secret Beyond the Door,' Charles Laughton's 'The Night of the Hunter,' and Nunnally Johnson's 'The Three Faces
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dracula & The Mummy: Complete Legacy Collections

The 2016 blu ray release of the Frankenstein and Wolf Man Legacy Collections was a moment of celebration for movie and monster lovers everywhere, bringing together all the golden age appearances of Frankenstein’s misbegotten creation and Larry Talbot’s hairy alter-ego. Universal Studios treated those dusty creature features to luminous restorations; from Bride of Frankenstein to She Wolf of London, these essential artifacts never looked less than impeccable and, at times, even ravishing. Colin Clive’s frenzied declaration, “It’s Alive!”, never felt more appropriate.

Now Universal has turned their attention to their other legendary franchise players, Dracula, the sharp-dressed but undead ladies’ man and Im-ho-tep, the cursed Egyptian priest who loved not wisely but too well.

Dracula: Complete Legacy Collection

Blu-ray

Universal Studios Home Entertainment

1931, ’36, ’43, ’44, ’45, ’48 / 449 min. / B&W / 1:33 / Street Date May 16, 2017

Starring: Actors: Bela Lugosi, Lon Chaney Jr. , Boris Karloff, Bud Abbott, Lou Costello

Cinematography: Karl Freund,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

It Came From The Tube: Crowhaven Farm (1970)

The cultural impact of satanic megahit Rosemary’s Baby (1968) was substantial and immediate. All of a sudden supernatural horror was in vogue, whether directly mentioning the Big S or delving into covens and cults. Somehow if money was to be made, Lucifer would be there with his asbestos lined suitcase ready to take donations from one and all. Which brings us to the small screen’s Crowhaven Farm (1970), an ABC Movie of the Week that terrified TV audiences with the knowledge that not all evil has to be metropolitan.

Originally airing on Tuesday, November 24th, Crowhaven Farm’s closest competition was CBS’s Hee Haw, but even those yokels couldn’t beat ABC’s juggernaut, which always won its time slot. And while it may not be a match for Rosemary’s devilish wit and urbane horror (not much is), Crowhaven Farm still offers plenty of spooky, countrified atmosphere.

Let
See full article at DailyDead »

The Woodman

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This week sees the 40th anniversary of Woody Allen’s Annie Hall so a career overview for the brilliant humorist/director seems in order.

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Take the Money and Run originally had a different ending that was cut by editor Ralph Rosenblum. What was it?

Woody is killed in a bloody gun ambush. Woody becomes president. Woody appears to tear a hole in the movie screen and “escapes” into the theater.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Grapes Of Wrath Screening Thursday March 16th at Webster University

“Sure don’t look none too prosperous.”

The Grapes Of Wrath (1940) screens Thursday March 16th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). The movie starts at 7:30. The screeening is sponsored by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis *(experienceopera.org) who will be staging an opera version of The Grapes Of Wrath May 27th, 31st, June 9th, 15th, 17th, 21st, and 25th. Cliff Froehlich, Executive Director of Cinema St. Louis, will introduce and lead a discussion following the screening. This is a Free event!

John Ford directed so many classics, but The Grapes Of Wrath may be his best. Adapted from John Steinbeck’s 1939 novel, The Grapes Of Wrath tells of the hardships of the Great Depression on Oklahoma sharecroppers who are forced to migrate to Californian for menial work. The film paints a stark picture ofour country’s most bleak period. A time when unemployment was around 25%, dust was choking off normally reliable farmland,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

One of the Greatest Film Noir Stars of Them All? Four Crime Classics to Remember

Dana Andrews movies: Film noir actor excelled in both major and minor crime dramas. Dana Andrews movies: First-rate film noir actor excelled in both classics & minor fare One of the best-looking and most underrated actors of the studio era, Dana Andrews was a first-rate film noir/crime thriller star. Oftentimes dismissed as no more than a “dependable” or “reliable” leading man, in truth Andrews brought to life complex characters that never quite fit into the mold of Hollywood's standardized heroes – or rather, antiheroes. Unlike the cynical, tough-talking, and (albeit at times self-delusionally) self-confident characters played by the likes of Alan Ladd, Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, and, however lazily, Robert Mitchum, Andrews created portrayals of tortured men at odds with their social standing, their sense of ethics, and even their romantic yearnings. Not infrequently, there was only a very fine line separating his (anti)heroes from most movie villains.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Western Union

Wow! Fritz Lang's second western is a marvel -- a combo of matinee innocence and that old Germanic edict that character equals fate. It has a master's sense of color and design. Robert Young is an odd fit but Randolph Scott is nothing less than terrific. You'd think Lang was born on the Pecos. Western Union Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1941 / Color /1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / Street Date November 8, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Randolph Scott, Robert Young, Virginia Gilmore, Dean Jagger, John Carradine, Chill Wills, Slim Summerville, Barton MacLane, Victor Kilian, George Chandler, Chief John Big Tree, Iron Eyes Cody, Jay Silverheels. Cinematography Edward Cronjager, Allen M. Davey Original Music David Buttolph Written by Robert Carson from the novel by Zane Grey Produced by Harry Joe Brown (associate) Directed by Fritz Lang

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Darryl Zanuck of 20th Fox treated most writers well, was good for John Ford
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Ten Commandments Screens October 5th at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“Oh, Moses, Moses, you stubborn, splendid, adorable fool!”

The Ten Commandments screens Wednesday October 5th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as part of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Sixty years after its initial release, The Ten Commandments remains one of the highest-grossing and most popular titles of all time. Filmed in Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula with one of the biggest sets ever constructed for a motion picture, The Ten Commandments remains a cinematic triumph and perennial fan-favorite. Directed by renowned filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille, The Ten Commandments grossed more than $65 million at the U.S. box office in 1956—equal to more than $1.1 billion today—ranking it below only Gone With the Wind, Star Wars, The Sound of Music, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and Titanic on the list of highest-grossing titles.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Johnny Guitar (widescreen)

Olive's new branded line reissues the Nicholas Ray classic with a full set of authoritative extras -- plus a never-before-seen widescreen transfer, in all of its Trucolor glory. Joan Crawford and Sterling Hayden never looked better -- we can all compare theories about la Crawford's color-coded costumes. Just how masculine is Vienna supposed to be? Johnny Guitar (Olive Signature widescreen edition) Blu-ray Olive Films 1954 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date September 20, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 39.95 but heavily discounted Starring Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden, Mercedes McCambridge, Scott Brady, Ward Bond, Ben Cooper, Ernest Borgnine, John Carradine, Royal Dano, Frank Ferguson, Paul Fix, Rhys Williams. Cinematography Harry Stradling Film Editor Richard Van Enger Original Music Victor Young Written by Philip Yordan from the novel by Roy Chanslor Produced by Herbert J. Yates Directed by Nicholas Ray

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Wow, it's already been four years since Olive released a
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

August 30th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Deathstalker / Deathstalker II Double Feature

While horror is riding high theatrically side this week, August 30th’s genre home entertainment releases are a bit on the quieter side, with only a handful of titles coming our way. Scream Factory is releasing the sword and sorcery movies Deathstalker and Deathstalker II on a double feature Blu-ray, and for you cult film fans out there, Vinegar Syndrome has given Evils of the Night an HD overhaul.

Other notable home entertainment titles for the week of August 3oth include Blood Redd, Dreadtime Stories, Walking Dead in the West, and a serial killer themed three-movie combo pack from Rlj Entertainment.

Deathstalker / Deathstalker II (Double feature Blu-ray available exclusively on Shout! Factory’s website)

Deathstalker (1983)

Deathstalker (Richard Hill) is a mighty warrior chosen to battle the evil forces of a medieval kingdom who sets off on a journey to the most challenging tournament in the land. To the
See full article at DailyDead »

Random Roles: Keith Carradine on Deadwood, Fargo, and Madonna

Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

The actor: Though he’s the son of an actor (John Carradine), the brother of two notable actors (Robert and David Carradine), and a man with three kids—Martha Plimpton, Cade Carradine, and Sorel Carradine—who have all grown up to be actors, Keith Carradine originally had no plans to pursue the life of a thespian himself. Thankfully, he eventually succumbed to the inevitable and changed his mind, resulting in a long and prolific career which has seen him earning acclaim for his work in film (Nashville), television (Chiefs), and Broadway (The Will Rogers Follies), even making his way into the upper reaches of the Billboard Hot 100 (“I’m Easy”). Carradine recently wrapped up a new film ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Invisible Invaders

"Earth Given 24 Hours to Surrender!" Invisible murderous moon maniacs invade, with invisible troops and invisible flying saucers! John Agar, Jean Byron and John Carradine do their best to keep this underfed sci-fi turnip on its feet --- and we diehard monster fans love it. Invisible Invaders Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1959 / B&W /1:66 widescreen / 67 min. / Street Date July 12, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring John Agar, Jean Byron, Philip Tonge, Robert Hutton, John Carradine, Paul Langton. Cinematography Maury Gertsman Film Editor Grant Whytock Original Music Paul Dunlap Written by Samuel Newman Produced by Robert E. Kent Directed by Edward L. Cahn

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

At the tail end of the '50s monster boom the pickings became lean indeed. For every killer matinee filler like The Blob or The Fly, cheap double bills encouraged by American-International's example became even cheaper. Producers at Columbia, Allied Artists and United Artists turned out
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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