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1-20 of 306 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


The Pianist, Dracula Composer Wojciech Kilar Dead At 81

29 December 2013 1:26 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

THR has reported that composer Wojciech Kilar died on Sunday at the age of 81.

Among his many film score credits are Dracula (d. Francis Ford Coppola), The Portrait Of A Lady (d. Jane Campion). We Own The Night (d. James Gray), Death And The Maiden, The Pianist and The Ninth Gate (d. Roman Polanski).

The composer’s accolades include a BAFTA nomination (Anthony Asquith Award for Film Music) and César Award in 2003 for Best Music Written for a Film, The Pianist and the Ascap Award in 1993 for Top Box Office Films, Dracula.

In a 2007 interview with Plus, a journal about Polish-American affairs, he recalled asking Coppola in Los Angeles what kind of music he was expecting and the director replied: “I did my part. You are the composer. Do what you want.”

Kilar’s dedication to composing primarily for the concert halls even led him to lose a commission to »

- Michelle McCue

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‘The Pianist’ Composer Wojciech Kilar Dies at 81

29 December 2013 10:26 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Wojciech Kilar, a Polish pianist and composer of classical music and scores for many films, including Roman Polanski’s Oscar-winning “The Pianist” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” died Sunday. He was 81.

The composer died in his hometown of Katowice, southern Poland, following a long illness, according to Jerzy Kornowicz, head of the Association of Polish Composers.

“The power and the message of his music, as well as the noble character of Wojciech Kilar as a person, will stay in my memory forever,” said Kornowicz.

Polish film director Kazimierz Kutz said working with the composer “was pure pleasure. He would come, see my movie and a month later he would bring extremely good music that was always beyond my expectations.”

Polish conductor Antoni Wit praised Kilar’s generosity, saying he “liked to share whatever he had with others.”

A modest man who often avoided public attention, Kilar »

- Associated Press

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25 Best TV Shows of 2013 (Part Three)

27 December 2013 10:09 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

10. The Good Wife (CBS)

This year, The Good Wife did the unthinkable. Five seasons (and almost 100 episodes) in, it blew up the show. The original premise, that the publically shamed wife of a crooked politician begins her life anew at a former flame’s law firm, is gone, replaced by a baroque melodrama of conflicting loyalties and devastating emotional stakes. The progression of the series over the course of the year has been masterfully executed, with creators Robert and Michelle King building subtly to April’s season four finale, wherein Alicia decided to leave the firm at which she’d worked since the pilot, and then again very carefully to the season five explosion, when Alicia’s plans are discovered and she’s fired, leading to all-out legal war between the old firm, Lockhart Gardner, and the new one, Florrick Agos. There are emotional and legal casualties left and right »

- Kate Kulzick

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Merging BBC2 and BBC4 would be a terrible mistake | Kirsty Lang

27 December 2013 9:56 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From Borgen to The Fall, we're living through a golden age of television. David Dimbleby's proposal would leave no room for all these riches

As a committed fan of the Danish political drama Borgen, I'm excited that in 2014 I could have more Danish TV goodies to binge on. Legacy is about the fallout from the 1968 generation. Set in a large Danish country house, the makers cite Downton Abbey, Festen and The Ice Storm as inspirations for the story about a famous artist, her liberal, hippy ideas about child-rearing, and her four adult children. It's the kind of drama that promises to examine the state of the nation with great characters and compelling plot twists. We feel intelligent while being entertained. Perfect.

It pains me to disagree with David Dimbleby, but on the issue of BBC4 I must. How can he ask for the channel to be axed when it »

- Kirsty Lang

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Merging BBC2 and BBC4 would be a terrible mistake | Kirsty Lang

25 December 2013 6:59 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

From Borgen to The Fall, we're living through a golden age of television. David Dimbleby's proposal would leave no room for all these riches

As a committed fan of the Danish political drama Borgen, I'm excited by the news that in 2014 I will have more Danish TV goodies to binge on. Legacy – about the fallout from the 1968 generation – was purchased by the BBC even before it launched in Denmark this month. Set in a large Danish country house, the makers cite Downton Abbey, Festen and The Ice Storm as inspirations for the story about a famous artist, her liberal, hippy ideas about child-rearing, and her four adult children. It's the kind of drama that promises to examine the state of the nation with great characters and compelling plot twists. We will feel intelligent while being entertained. Perfect.

It pains me to disagree with David Dimbleby, but on the issue of BBC4 I must. »

- Kirsty Lang

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The best TV of 2013: Phil Hogan's choice

21 December 2013 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

If not quite a vintage year, 2013 will be remembered for Netflix's innovation and a succession of bleakly engrossing crime dramas

Read the Observer critics' reviews of the year in full here

Doctor Who turned 50; BBC4 showed its last biopic (Burton and Taylor, with Dominic West and Helena Bonham Carter); Netflix arrived and turned TV watching on its head with House of Cards… but that's enough milestones. We weren't deluged with fabulous new shows that had the nation gibbering with expectation. Two of the best were quite ancient – chemistry thriller Breaking Bad (another coup for Netflix) and scatterbrain comedy Parks and Recreation, both Us imports that took off over here after several seasons over there. And, still on Us comedy, the second season of Lena Dunham's Girls was funny, sharp and full of surprising nudity. Returning successes Downton Abbey and Homeland stuttered rather than soared, though Call the Midwife – another »

- Phil Hogan

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Inside every great actor there's a mediocre singer

20 December 2013 10:01 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Since Anne Hathaway landed her Oscar, every movie star's been threatening to break into song

Anne Hathaway

Les Misérables

Hathaway's heart-rending portrayal of Susan Boyle won her the Oscar for most severe haircut and opened the floodgates for a year of thespian ballad-belting. Ever the trendsetter, she dispensed with the usual X Factor trappings and opted for a Sinéad O'Connor-meets-the-French-revolution theme. Work it all the way to the workhouse, girl!

Peter Mullan

Sunshine On Leith

Who knew? The gruff Scot's sandpaper-rough, booze-slurred rendition of the Proclaimers' Oh Jean suggests he has a Christmas album in him at the very least. But, really, someone needs to whip up a Glasgow-set musical for him built around Leonard Cohen's back catalogue. First We'll Take Buchanan?

Vithaya Pansringarm

Only God Forgives

After a hard day's dismembering, impaling and beating the crap out of Ryan Gosling, there's nothing a Bangkok cop likes more »

- Steve Rose

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Unique accolade for Australian Cinematographers Society

17 December 2013 12:37 PM, PST | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Australian Cinematographers Society national president Ron Johanson felt he was being called to the headmaster.s office when he was asked to take an urgent Skype call from the AFI/Aacta.

CEO Damian Trewhella told him about the Byron Kennedy Award, named after the co-founder of the Mad Max production company Kennedy Miller (now Kennedy Miller Mitchell), who died aged 33 in a helicopter crash in 1983.

The affable Johanson asked, .What.s that got to do with me?. He was flabbergasted when he was informed the Acs is the recipient of the next Byron Kennedy Award, which celebrates outstanding creative enterprise in the film and television industries and is given to an individual or organisation whose work embodies innovation and the pursuit of excellence.

It.s the first time the award, first presented in 1984, has been bestowed on a guild or professional association. Past honorees include Roger Savage, Dion Beebe, Jane Campion, »

- Don Groves

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Zbanic slams “unjust” treatment of women in cinema

17 December 2013 12:09 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Award-winning director Jasmila Zbanic has echoed Jane Campion’s call to mandate that 50% of all films should be made by women.

Zbanic, the Bosnian director of Berlinale winner Grbavica and For Those Who Can Tell No Tales, has received the inaugural Femme du Cinema award at the Les Arcs European Film Festival (Dec 14-21).

The honorary award recognises a female director, producer or actress deemed to be “particularly emblematic of European cinema”.

Accepting the honour, Zbanic thanked Les Arcs for creating an award that “raises awareness of the unjust treatment of women in cinema”.

In her speech, the director slammed the “fascistic” portrayal of women on screen and repeated a call by Jane Campion, the New Zealand director of The Piano and Top of the Lake, to impose quotas on production.

“When I go to the cinema, I don’t care if the film is made by a man or woman as long as it tells me stories »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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The best TV of 2013: No 8 – Top of the Lake (BBC2)

16 December 2013 12:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Jane Campion's unsettling six-parter told a dark story, but there was humour inside its bleak heart, and the cast was simply outstanding

• Best TV of 2013 from 30-21

• Best TV of 2013 from 20-11

• Best TV of 2013 number 9: Borgen

This was the year in which the small screen became truly big. As well as indulging its cinematic ambitions in beautiful, vast shows such as Breaking Bad and Utopia, 2013 saw directors of films come running to television, attracted by the languorous pacing and scope. Sean Durkin made Southcliffe for Channel 4. The Coen brothers signed up to make a mini-series of Fargo. Jodie Foster turned her hand to Netflix hit Orange is the New Black. And Jane Campion, the director of The Piano, made the gorgeous Top of the Lake.

This strange, grim six-parter was a co-production between the BBC, Australia's UKTV and the Sundance Channel, and it told a dark story with increasing devastation. »

- Rebecca Nicholson

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Golden Globes nominations: McQueen, Elba and Ejiofor head breakthrough

12 December 2013 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Black British film talent tops nominations and BBC dramas also hope to carry off major wins

12 Years a Slave, a harrowing account of American slavery by the British visual artist turned film director Steve McQueen, established itself as the film to beat at the start of awards season, picking up seven nominations at the 71st annual Golden Globes.

Announced at a dawn press conference in Beverly Hills, California, the nominations were a significant breakthrough for black British film talent. McQueen was nominated as best director while Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave) and Idris Elba (Mandela: The Long Walk to Freedom) bagged acting nominations. Other British performers up for awards include Christian Bale (American Hustle), Kate Winslet (Labor Day), Emma Thompson (Saving Mr Banks), Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine) and Judi Dench (Philomena).

Elba and Ejiofor will be hoping for success in both the film and TV categories, with the pair also »

- Xan Brooks, Jason Deans

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Hugh Laurie wins top New Zealand film prize

11 December 2013 5:06 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Hugh Laurie has been named Best Actor at the New Zealand Film Awards.

The British star won the Moa - New Zealand's equivalent of an Oscar - for his role in Mr Pip.

In the film, Laurie plays teacher Tom Watts, who reads Charles Dickens to children on a struggling Pacific island.

His child co-star Xzannjah won the award for Best Actress, while the film itself also won two prizes.

The Andrew Adamson-directed movie was released in Australia and New Zealand in October, but has not yet arrived at cinemas elsewhere.

Rites of passage movie Shopping was the biggest winner of the night, taking six awards.

Top of the Lake - written by New Zealand scribe Jane Campion - was named Best Television Feature.

Watch the trailer for Mr Pip below:

Catch up on all the latest TV and Movies releases in Digital Spy's Screen Time: »

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Jennifer Lawrence and Chloë Grace Moretz lead chart of IMDb page views

11 December 2013 4:36 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Women lead movie website popularity chart, outranking top male actors as report highlights Hollywood's gender inequality

• News: Women successful yet sidelined in writing and directing

• Blog: Why are there so few female film-makers?

Jennifer Lawrence and Chloë Grace Moretz have been named by IMDb as the most popular actors in the world, a day after the New York Film Academy published new evidence of widening gender inequality in Hollywood.

Based on page views by the IMDb's 160 million users, Lawrence emerged as the most popular star, thanks largely to her best actress Oscar win in March for Silver Linings Playbook and her leading role in the dystopian blockbuster The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. Sixteen-year-old Moretz has appeared in two big movies this year, the comic-book sequel Kick Ass 2 and the horror remake Carrie.

The young women are of more interest to IMDb users than more established male stars. Leonardo DiCaprio and Johnny Depp, »

- Ben Child

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Auteur Directors: Any American Women?

9 December 2013 2:30 PM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

In 100 years of cinema, no American woman director has ever been invited to join the pantheon of international auteur directors. Non-American women directors like Andrea Arnold, Jane Campion, Liliana Cavani, Claire Denis, Marleen Gorris, Agnieszka Holland, Lynne Ramsay, Agnes Varda, Lina Wertmuller among others-- directors with bodies of work that match those of their male counterparts-- hardly exist in America, with the possible exceptions of masterful experimental directors, Maya Daren and Nina Menkes.

Kathryn Bigelow, who could be a top contender for American auteur director, had to leave America, after six years of unemployment, to seek financing in Europe, and is still not included with men among auteur directors. Other successful women directors who have made both commercially and critically successful features in America are mostly film and TV stars: Drew Barrymore, Jodie Foster, Penny Marshall, Barbra Streisand, Betty Thomas, to name a few. These directors have done fine work, but mostly within the confines of the studio system where, just once in a blue moon, a director like Nora Ephron, Catherina Hardwicke, Mimi Leder or Nancy Meyers can carve a niche.

The question arises, who are the American women directors whose films reveal the work of an auteur director? One could jump in with dozens of directors, from Anders, Arzner, Bigelow, Cholondenko, Coppola, Coolidge, Dash, Dunham, Hardwicke & Holofcener— just to start through the alphabet, but like Bigelow, none of these excellent directors is embraced as an auteur by the paternalist American film establishment.

In the United States less than 5% of feature films are directed by women, so for a director to emerge who is not already a women celebrity, is virtually impossible. Women directors usually make just one film before getting taken down early in the pipeline: if it’s not the misogynistic Hollywood studio system that expels them, their films are given paltry distribution and P&A budgets, or sometimes gender-biased critics comprised of over 80% males will likely taint their reviews.

One perfect example of a very fine American woman director whose body of work clearly distinguishes her as an auteur director is Jane Spencer. Jane Spencer is the director of the beloved low-budget indie feature Little Noises that premiered at Sundance some years ago to ecstatic reviews— and enamored audiences, and of Faces On Mars, which premiered in Europe at Solothurn. Her new film, The Ninth Cloud, which is being repped for distribution by Shoreline Entertainment is a dreamy, surreal marvel, which could do very well on the 2014 international festival circuit.

For Spencer, who dreams big, but must keep her budget small, ingenuity is the name of the game. As she says, “My dream as a kid was to direct big David Lean-style epics, so working within the framework I can create, I try to imbue my indie films with giant, epic themes.” Imagine if women directors like Spencer were afforded the budgets and opportunities to realize their immense talents for creating epic, visionary films.

I have always thought that film directors are like alchemists and magicians, but women directors have to be able to master another kind of magic as well: film financing in a void. Most women directors must cobble their production budgets together in any number of mysterious ways, and I wanted to know how Spencer had done it again. How did she succeed in making yet another wonderful feature film? How had she found the money?

Spencer answered the question with a question: “In an industry so difficult for women directors, how can any women director raise the money to make a film? You are basically forced to think outside the box. You just can’t give up. You try all the traditional methods: submit your script to actors, agents, studios, production companies, get it to friends in the business. They almost always lead to dead ends.

“So, finally, you go out and find it dollar-by-dollar— private equity from investors who like the project obviously, private loans you— yourself— take out. You get everything on the cheap, but keep the quality; get everyone to do you favors, but make sure they ‘get it’ and believe in the film. That’s the only way an American woman can make an indie feature film.”

Spencer shot The Ninth Cloud on super 16mm. Having a film camera instead of shooting digitally gives The Ninth Cloud a look that is simultaneously both very modern and nostalgic. As Spencer says, “It allows for the documentary, free-camera look I wanted to capture inspired by films like The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, Darling, and Billy Liar. These low-budget 1960’s British kitchen sink films were an inspiration for Spencer, her Production Designer/Producer Richard Hudson and her Dp, Sam Mitchell. She goes on, “I wanted the film to express an impressionistic vision of Zena’s (the main character) world.”

In the film, in which we follow the dreamy, strange Zena, through what turn out to be her final days....Spencer glorifies the vulnerable Zena through a nuanced appreciation for her ability to “see.” Keeping her indie budget low, Spencer uses inexpensive, old film technology to record her character’s fleeting, childlike, and magical perception of the world around her—and it works beautifully. The film captures the elusive, dream-like moments, as fleeting as a painter’s sudden awareness of reflected sunlight glancing off rippling water-- impressionism-- that gets at the essence of art, and is the very reason we revere our great male “Masters of Cinema.”

As Spencer puts it: “I wanted to depict, from a women’s perspective for once, the victorious dreamer. One doesn’t have to accept ‘reality’ to live a meaningful life. Whatever your journey is—stay with your dream. You cannot be dissuaded by pressure to conform to social norms, systems, or institutions that tell you ‘cannot' because it’s 'unrealistic' or 'impossible.'"

We all know that numerically, becoming a female film director in America is virtually impossible— as former DGA president, Martha Coolidge says: “like winning the lottery.” It’s a bizarre anomaly that America, the leader of the free world, virtually excludes women from its most culturally influential global export—media. Hollywood’s level of support of women film directors is among the worst in the world, something that is now accentuated by the recent drafting of international charters that promote the gender equity among women directors in many countries outside the United States.

However, making feature films that move and inspire audiences is Spencer’s quest and she has not been dissuaded by statistics. She says: “This was a very, very difficult film to finance. We had some wonderful equity investors, our own company invested a lot of the money-- especially for post, and there turned out to be not many pre-sales. It was very much patchwork financing, very hard, and we filmed it over the space of a year, in sections, because budget-wise, we had to.”

Even after her critical success at Sundance her studio meetings were difficult. After years of struggling to get financed out of L.A., Spencer happened to move to Europe for personal reasons, and immediately had much better luck.

"We got it done-- though at times we didn’t think we would. We started financing in 2008 when the financial crisis happened, so some of our financiers fell out. Our wonderful male lead at the time, Guillaume Depardieu, whom I adored, died of pneumonia on a set in Romania. I really wondered if this film would happen - for a moment. But then the producers and I got right back up on our feet and started financing it again. We found the amazing lead actress Megan Maczko in a play on London’s West End....Michael Madsen, who is great in the film—so sympathetic -- playing a dishwasher/poet (instead of a guy with a gun) - was lovely and stayed with the project....and we got the great French actor Jean Hugues Anglade onboard - We got right back up on our feet and started financing it again. By 2011 we had finished shooting. We’ve been in post for two years: all of 2012 and much of 2013.”

All the hard work has been well worth the effort. Spencer’s multi-layered film is woven with themes of Djuna Barnes and Baudelaire and traverses the landscapes of Marcel Carne and Antonioni. What makes the film so exceptional is how freshly these motifs have been re-imagined through this director’s effortless lens. The Ninth Cloud is at once tender and deeply moving, yet it manages to reject sentimentalities while glorifying its heroine and uplifting the audience.

Will women directors like Spencer ever join the pantheon of international male auteur directors? That depends upon the whether or not the U.S. cultural consciousness evolves to finally embrace gender equity in our nation’s most influential global export—media. Only then will women directors get the budgets and opportunities to test their metal and take their rightful places in the annals of American cinema.

The Ninth Cloud will be opening in select theaters internationally starting 2014.

Please visit The Int’l List of Living Women Directors: http://www.womendirectorsinhollywood.com/

Marie Giese is American feature film director, a writer, a member & elected Director Category Representative for women at the DGA. She graduated from Wellesley College and UCLA graduate film schooland co-founded the foremost international web forum for political action for women directors (Visit Here). An activist for parity for women directors in Hollywood, she is in development to direct two feature films Rain and Treasure Hunt »

- Maria Giese

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Watch the Trailer for Joseph Gordon-Levitt's 'HitRecord on TV,' Set to Debut at Sundance and on Pivot in January

6 December 2013 6:58 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Joseph Gordon-Levitt will debut his new television show "HitRecord on TV" at Sundance this year. The first three episodes of the reimagined variety show will premiere in the New Frontier sidebar, where Gordon-Levitt has previously screened work from HitRecord, the crowdsourced multimedia production company he founded. This marks a second incursion of TV into the festival, after Jane Campion's miniseries "Top of the Lake" played last year.  "HitRecord on TV" will play Sundance on January 17th and will premiere on Pivot, the cable network launched by Participant Media earlier this year, on January 18th with two back-to-back episodes. The season consists of eight episodes overall. "I can't think of a better way to celebrate the premiere of 'HitRecord on TV' than by a screening at Sundance -- a place that means a great deal to me personally," said Gordon-Levitt. "We launched hitRECord as a production company at Sundance back »

- Alison Willmore

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Watch the Trailer for Joseph Gordon-Levitt's 'HitRecord on TV,' Set to Debut at Sundance and on Pivot in January

6 December 2013 6:58 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Joseph Gordon-Levitt will debut his new television show "HitRecord on TV" at Sundance this year. The first three episodes of the reimagined variety show will premiere in the New Frontier sidebar, where Gordon-Levitt has previously screened work from HitRecord, the crowdsourced multimedia production company he founded. This marks a second incursion of TV into the festival, after Jane Campion's miniseries "Top of the Lake" played last year.  "HitRecord on TV" will play Sundance on January 17th and will premiere on Pivot, the cable network launched by Participant Media earlier this year, on January 18th with two back-to-back episodes. The season consists of eight episodes overall. "I can't think of a better way to celebrate the premiere of 'HitRecord on TV' than by a screening at Sundance -- a place that means a great deal to me personally," said Gordon-Levitt. "We launched hitRECord as a production company at Sundance back »

- Alison Willmore

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The Rest Is Noise Festival: New World Order

4 December 2013 7:48 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Pluralism is the defining feature of music at the end of the 20th century – from the minimalist film music of Michael Nyman to the lush sounds of Toru Takemitsu to the spectralist works that explored sound itself, writes Gillian Moore

"We live in a time not of mainstream but of many streams," John Cage mused as he surveyed the musical scene shortly before his death in 1992, "or even, if you insist upon a river of time, then we have come to the delta, maybe even beyond a delta to an ocean which is going back to the skies … "

The 12th and final episode of The Rest Is Noise festival is called New World Order. It may still be too early to have the historical distance to tell what really mattered in classical music at the end of the 20th century. What is clear, however, is that in the closing decades »

- Gillian Moore

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Gatsby, Rocket lead Aacta noms

3 December 2013 2:43 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Other best film nominations include Dead Europe, Mystery Road, Satellite Boy and The Turning.Scroll down for full list

Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby and Kim Mordaunt’s The Rocket lead the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television (Aacta) Award nominations: 14 and 12 respectively, it was announced today.

Luhrmann’s adaptation of F Scott Fitzgerald 1925 novel was made on a Hollywood-sized budget by a very experienced director while festival hit The Rocket, which tells the story of a boy trying to prove he isn’t cursed, was filmed in Laos by a writer/director who had not previously made a dramatic feature.

The Rocket and The Great Gatsby are pitted against each other for the prestigious best film award, for best director and in three of the four acting categories.

The best actor award, for example, could go to Leonardo DiCaprio for his performance in The Great Gatsby or to Sitthiphon Disamoe, a one-time »

- Sandy.George@me.com (Sandy George)

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The Secret Life of Walter Mitty | Review

22 November 2013 10:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Life is Like a Box of Chalk: Stiller Revamps Thurber for Hollow Melancholy

With its soaring visuals and dizzying soundtrack of expertly placed tunes to inspire the melancholy soul, Ben Stiller’s latest film, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, plays like the visual counterpart of a sugar high—a package that initially seems primed to stir emotions but tends to fizzle out without a substantive payoff. Based, in part, on a short story by James Thurber, which also provided the basis for a 1947 musical starring Danny Kaye, Stiller and screenwriter Steven Conrad (who insistently returns to the regular-Joe-breaking-his-mold motif), neglect to instill emotional depth to this adventure about bettering oneself, distracted by its own gloss and terms of endearment, as if Michael Bay were trying to emulate Wes Anderson.

Walter Mitty (Ben Stiller), a negative asset manager at prestigious Life magazine, lives a drab existence, disappearing into his own »

- Nicholas Bell

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Watch: Jane Campion's Palme d'Or-Winning 1982 Short 'Peel'

15 November 2013 7:17 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

One of the great joys of being a film fan in the internet age is finding and seeing work that otherwise wouldn’t be easily accessible. Case in point, Jane Campion’s 1982 short film “Peel”—which won the New Zealand-born filmmaker the Short Film Palme d’Or at that year’s Cannes Film Festival, making her the first woman to have ever done so—has found its way online. Though certainly not as polished-looking as this year’s Sundance Channel miniseries “Top Of The Lake,” Campion had a sure and steady hand directing even in the beginning. Clocking in just under nine minutes, the short follows a family—a father, son and daughter—taking a road trip that grows more uncomfortable and tense. To reveal anymore would ruin the surprise of this self-described “exercise in discipline.” Watch “Peel” below and catch up with either the Elisabeth Moss-starring “Top Of The Lake »

- Cain Rodriguez

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