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1-20 of 50 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Dancing With the Stars Premiere Recap: Which Season 25 Pair Won You Over?

18 September 2017 7:04 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

A Pretty Little Liar, a Property Brother and a pair of Lacheys — who are married(!!!) in case you missed that part — were among the new crop of contestants introduced Monday in Dancing With the Stars‘ 25th season premiere.

I’m not about to get too nitpicky about technique, etc. in the first episode — the scores also speak for themselves — so what you’ll find below are my initial (and occasionally troubling) reactions to the 13 pairs competing this season:

* Terrell Owens and Cheryl Burke: I knew this first dance was going to be a rollercoaster of emotions as soon as the NFL legend started miming. »

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‘mother!’ and ‘The Shape of Water’: 2 Strong, Strange Oscar Movies, But One Will Be a Harder Sell

11 September 2017 12:08 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Artists create worlds that are extreme visions of our own. This fall, several films accomplish this with varying degrees of success; Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” is the most accomplished. Del Toro builds, brick by brick, an immersive fantasy world (shot in Toronto around the venerable Elgin Theatre) inspired by the ’60s melodramas of Douglas Sirk and the horror classic “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” that could only come from his prodigious imagination.

Cinephiles will fall happily into this fairy-tale romance that matches lonely mute laboratory cleaning woman Eliza Esposito (incandescent Sally Hawkins, who will be nominated for her sensual, powerful performance) with a well-muscled captive merman (Doug Jones). They see beauty and sensuality in each other where others see abhorrent aberration.

You can argue that Michael Shannon is typecast as the heartless government villain who tortures the gorgeous aquatic creature he calls “the asset,” but »

- Anne Thompson

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‘mother!’ and ‘The Shape of Water’: 2 Strong, Strange Oscar Movies, But One Will Be a Harder Sell

11 September 2017 12:08 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Artists create worlds that are extreme visions of our own. This fall, several films accomplish this with varying degrees of success; Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” is the most accomplished. Del Toro builds, brick by brick, an immersive fantasy world (shot in Toronto around the venerable Elgin Theatre) inspired by the ’60s melodramas of Douglas Sirk and the horror classic “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” that could only come from his prodigious imagination.

Cinephiles will fall happily into this fairy-tale romance that matches lonely mute laboratory cleaning woman Eliza Esposito (incandescent Sally Hawkins, who will be nominated for her sensual, powerful performance) with a well-muscled captive merman (Doug Jones). They see beauty and sensuality in each other where others see abhorrent aberration.

You can argue that Michael Shannon is typecast as the heartless government villain who tortures the gorgeous aquatic creature he calls “the asset,” but »

- Anne Thompson

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Venice Film Review: Jennifer Lawrence in ‘mother!’

5 September 2017 1:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If the only thing we wanted, or expected, a horror film to do was to get a rise out of you — to make your eyes widen and your jaw drop, to leave you in breathless chortling spasms of Wtf disbelief — then Darren Aronofsky’s “mother!” would have to be reckoned some sort of masterpiece. As it is, the movie, which stars Jennifer Lawrence as a woman who slips down a rabbit hole of paranoid could-this-be-happening? reality (she flushes a beating heart down the toilet; blood in the shape of a vagina melts through the floorboards; and oh, the wackjobs who keep showing up!), is far from a masterpiece. It’s more like a dazzlingly skillful machine of virtual reality designed to get nothing but a rise out of you. It’s a baroque nightmare that’s about nothing but itself.

Yet for an increasingly large swath of the moviegoing audience, that may be enough. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in September 2017

1 September 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

August is finally over, the summer movie season is in the rear-view mirror, and we’re entering that magical time of year when the studios actually care about the quality of the films they put out into the world. Netflix, always eager to provide the public with a good reason to stay home, is responding to the sudden uptick in must-see Hollywood fare by busting out the big guns and releasing an absolutely killer line-up of modern classics (click here for the complete list).

From the defining indie of the 21st century to the greatest romance of the 21st, these are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in September.

Read More:7 New Netflix Shows to Binge in September 2017, and The Best Episodes of Each 7. “Vincent N Roxxy” (2016)

Unfolding like a Nicholas Winding Refn-directed remake of “Shotgun Stories,” Gary Michael Schultz’s “Vincent N Roxxy” is a nasty »

- David Ehrlich

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Apply Now for AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women

17 August 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Dww Faculty Member Patty Jenkins on the set of “Wonder Woman:” Jenkins’ Twitter account

The continuous lack of female directors in Hollywood should come as no surprise. The numbers have, more or less, remained the same over the past 10 years. Slowly but surely, AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women (Dww) is trying to change that. Per its website, Dww is committed to “educating and mentoring female filmmakers to increase the number of [female] directors and showrunners.” This 43-year-old program is now on the lookout for its next class of upcoming women directors.

This year-long intensive program offers guided instruction on a short film or new media project. Dww is open to women with a minimum of three years’ experience, and up to eight projects are accepted each year. The program is tuition-free, but each participant must raise their own project funds.

Participants will receive roughly four months of mentorship with some of Dww’s distinguished faculty. Its list of mentors include, but is not limited to, Patty Jenkins (“Wonder Woman”), Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”), Jill Soloway (“Transparent”), and Issa Rae (“Insecure”).

The workshop guides participants through the entire filmmaking process, from production to picture-lock to post-production. Projects then are screened in an annual Showcase attended by agents, managers, producers, and executives.

Dww alumnae include Maya Angelou, Anne Bancroft, and Ellen Burstyn.

Applications cost $125 and will be accepted until August 31. Visit AFI’s Dww page to apply for the workshop or to find out more.

Apply Now for AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

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Gina Gershon interview: Inconceivable, Nic Cage, The Exorcist

16 August 2017 2:29 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Aug 29, 2017

The great Gina Gershon tells us about her latest film, Inconceivable, co-starring Nic Cage, plus her love of The Exorcist, and lots more...

In a career spanning over 30 years, Gina Gershon's worked with an incredible range of filmmakers, from Walter Hill in the 1980s to Robert Altman, Paul Verhoeven, John Woo, Michael Mann and the Wachowskis in the 90s and William Friedkin in 2011's Killer Joe.

See related  Game Of Thrones season 8: filming to get underway in October Game Of Thrones season 7 episode 7 review: The Dragon And The Wolf Game Of Thrones season 7: episode 7 questions answered

Her latest film, the domestic thriller Inconceivable, reunites Gershon with Nicolas Cage for the first time since 1997's Face/Off - albeit in very different roles. In Inconceivable, Gershon plays a well-to-do parent who begins to suspect that the woman who's agreed to be the surrogate mother to »

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David Arquette, Jenna Ortega to Star in Elephant Drama ‘Saving Flora’

4 August 2017 6:24 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

David Arquette, Jenna Ortega, Tom Arnold, Leonor Varela, and a veteran performing elephant named Tai are starring in the independent family drama “Saving Flora,” Variety has learned exclusively.

Production has begun in Los Angeles with British TV commercial veteran Mark Taylor directing. Producers are Amber Wang (“Rock Dog”), Fj ProductionsFabio Golombek (“Experimenter,” “Like Sunday Like Rain”), and Brad Billington (“Professional Affair,” “Lethal Cowboy”). »

- Dave McNary

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An Appreciation of Sam Shepard: A Countercultural Playwright Who Became, as an Actor, an Ironic Icon

31 July 2017 2:08 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There’s a grand irony to the life and career of Sam Shepard, who died Thursday at 73, that couldn’t have been lost on him. In the late ’60s and early ’70s, when he was first coming up as a playwright, he was part of a shaggy experimental New York theater scene, a kind of loose downtown collective that emerged from the dead flowers of the counterculture and grew into something else: a hazy ’70s druggie/poet garden of indolent creativity. It was an off-Broadway, off-kilter, semi-off-the-grid scene that sprouted up through the cracks of what had been hippie culture and would soon become punk.

Shepard wrote his plays with a wild-dog discursive freedom that would have been unimaginable before the ’60s, and his fabled romantic affair with a singer-poet named Patti Smith seemed baptized in a kind of bohemian purity. At that point, he’d already begun to flirt with Hollywood, though »

- Owen Gleiberman

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The Power of Christ Compels You to See The Exorcist Midnights This Weekend at The Tivoli

30 July 2017 7:45 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Your mother’s in here, Karras. Would you like to leave a message? I’ll see that she gets it.”

The Exorcist screens this Friday and Saturday nights (August 4th and 5th) at midnight at the Tivoli Theater as part of their ‘Reel Late at the Tivoli’  Midnight series.

This ground-breaking, starkly filmed thriller The Exorcist stands for many as one of the most terrifying films of all time. Fairly explicit for 1973, it raised the bar in film-making for realism and adult horror and has been emulated many times. However, it is set apart by its well-written (Oscar-winning) script and realistic performances. Ellen Burstyn is an actress who begins to sense unusual behavior in her preteen daughter (Linda Blair). The bizarre symptoms (open sores, violent thrashing, etc…) escalate as Burstyn seeks help from all conventional avenues. Finally, she determines that Blair is possessed by Satan (or a demon at least) and must be exorcised. »

- Tom Stockman

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San Francisco Film Society’s Annual Gala Moves to Awards Season

29 June 2017 3:59 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The San Francisco Film Society is moving its awards night from the spring into awards season, setting its 60th anniversary event for Dec. 5 at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts.

One of San Francisco’s most highly anticipated film events and social gatherings, Sf Film Awards Night has now moved to a new position in the city’s fall calendar, leveraging the Bay Area’s increasing awards season relevance and adding a new voice to the end-of-year film conversation,” the society said. “The program will recognize the storied careers of some of the best and brightest in contemporary cinema with special onstage tributes.”

The awards gala has always taken place during the San Francisco Film Festival in April. “We’ve been talking about this strategic move for awhile, and our big 60th anniversary seemed like the right time to do it,” spokesman Bill Proctor said.

The society’s awards, which »

- Dave McNary

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San Francisco Film Society Awards Night Moves Out of April To Join Year-End Oscars Chase

29 June 2017 8:13 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

San Francisco can claim more Oscar voters than any other city except Los Angeles and New York. (Many Los Angeles residents also live in the Bay Area.) That’s one reason the San Francisco Film Society executive director Noah Cowan, who witnessed the power of the Oscar race during his years at the Toronto International Film Festival, is jumping into the awards fray.

He’s moving the annual Sffilm Awards Night film achievement fundraiser out of the sprawling April festival, where it can get lost, and into the heart of awards season. The rebranded Sffilm Awards will take place December 5 at San Francisco’s renovated Palace of Fine Arts, in conjunction with the Sffs’s 60th anniversary.

Per usual, the program will honor contemporary cinema greats with onstage tributes including directing, acting, and storytelling awards. Past Sffilm awards have gone to Robert Altman, Ellen Burstyn, Frances Ford Coppola, Judy Davis, »

- Anne Thompson

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San Francisco Film Society Awards Night Moves Out of April To Join Year-End Oscars Chase

29 June 2017 8:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

San Francisco can claim more Oscar voters than any other city except Los Angeles and New York. (Many Los Angeles residents also live in the Bay Area.) That’s one reason the San Francisco Film Society executive director Noah Cowan, who witnessed the power of the Oscar race during his years at the Toronto International Film Festival, is jumping into the awards fray.

He’s moving the annual Sffilm Awards Night film achievement fundraiser out of the sprawling April festival, where it can get lost, and into the heart of awards season. The rebranded Sffilm Awards will take place December 5 at San Francisco’s renovated Palace of Fine Arts, in conjunction with the Sffs’s 60th anniversary.

Per usual, the program will honor contemporary cinema greats with onstage tributes including directing, acting, and storytelling awards. Past Sffilm awards have gone to Robert Altman, Ellen Burstyn, Frances Ford Coppola, Judy Davis, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘House of Cards’ Season 5: Who will earn Emmy nominations? Kevin Spacey, Robin Wright, Joel Kinnaman … [Poll]

23 June 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Last year “House of Cards” earned a whopping eight acting nominations at the Emmys: leads Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, supporting player Michael Kelly, and guest stars Mahershala Ali, Reg E. Cathey, Paul SparksEllen Burstyn and Molly Parker. While the Netflix political drama was shut out of all of those races, Emmy pundits are wondering […] »

- Marcus James Dixon

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Emmy Predictions 2017: Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

12 June 2017 5:28 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last Year’s Winner: Regina King, “American Crime

Still Eligible: Yes.

Hot Streak: Regina King won two years in a row for her roles in “American Crime.” ABC cancelled the well-reviewed but low-rated anthology series after its third season.

Fun Fact: No one has won more than twice in this category, though Kathy Bates holds the record for most nominations with seven total nods.

Perhaps the most intriguing competition within this category is internal. “Big Little Lies” offers a few options in supporting actresses, primarily Laura Dern and Shailene Woodley. Dern is a five-time nominee (and two-time Oscar nominee) and beloved within the community. (She’s reportedly up for the presidency of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.) Woodley could’ve been positioned as a lead, given her role’s prominence, and that could work for or against her in this category.

Read More:Laura Dern Speaks the »

- Ben Travers

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Alexander McQueen Documentary Lands at Bleecker Street

7 June 2017 11:17 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Bleecker Street has bought North American distribution rights to Ian Bonhote’s documentary about the life of late fashion designer Alexander McQueen.

It’s the first documentary for Bleecker Street, founded two years ago by former Focus Features co-ceo Andrew Karpen.

Photography is underway in London and Paris. Embankment Films began selling the project at the Berlin Film Festival and has closed deals with Lionsgate (U.K.), ProKino (Germany), Ascot Elite (Switzerland), Paradiso (Benelux), Kino (Japan), Madman (Australia), and Non-Stop (Scandinavia)

McQueen” is directed by Bonhote from a script by Peter Ettedgui and produced by Nick Taussig and Paul Van Carter of Salon Pictures, and Andee Ryder of Misfits Entertainment. The film will include newly-shot recreated scenes, motion and photographic archives, audio archives, and interviews.

“As Bleecker Street takes on its first documentary, we couldn’t be more excited about working with Ian on the life of Alexander McQueen,” Karpen said. »

- Dave McNary

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Sharon Stone Brings Two of Her Sons to Red Carpet Premiere of New Film

4 May 2017 5:58 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sharon Stone walked the red carpet for the premiere of her new film — A Little Something for Your Birthday — on Wednesday with two very special guys by her side: her sons.

It was a family affair at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood for the 59-year-old actress, who was all smiles as she wrapped her arms around boys Roan Joseph, 16 and Laird Vonne, 11 and posed for photos.

Wearing a one-shoulder emerald green mini dress, Stone looked happy as could be — her short blonde bob perfectly framing her grin. She helped her dress pop with all-gold accessories: gold glasses, bracelets, »

- Dave Quinn

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‘Vertigo’ Revisited: Guy Maddin Explores Hitchcock’s Classic With Found Footage — Sf International Film Festival

15 April 2017 2:19 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s usually unwise to remake a masterpiece, but Guy Maddin has something different planned for “The Green Fog,” a meditation on Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo.” Unlike Gus Van Sant’s much-maligned 1998 shot-for-shot remake of “Psycho,” the Canadian director has revisited the 1958 thriller as an assemblage of old footage from San Francisco, the city where “Vertigo” takes place.

However, the project was never intended to have anything to do with “Vertigo.”

In “The Green Fog — A San Francisco Fantasia,” commissioned by San Francisco Film Society and set to close the San Francisco International Film Festival’s 60th edition on April 16, Maddin and co-directors Evan and Galen Johnson explore what Maddin has called “a rhapsody” on the Hitchcock movie. Set to an original score by composer Jacob Garchik that will be performed live by the San Francisco-based Kronos Quartet, the 63-minute “The Green Fog” reimagines the movie through an assemblage of »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Leaning Into The Wind’ Is A Worthy Sequel To Documentary Smash ‘Rivers And Tides’ — Sf Film Festival Review

12 April 2017 8:53 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Either an artistic environmentalist or an environmental artist, Cheshire native Andy Goldsworthy has spent the better part of his life using natural resources (and almost nothing else) to create site-specific works that are built to fall apart. He wraps icicles around shrubs like ribbons, and leaves before they melt. He lies on the ground at the first hint of rain in order to leave a dry silhouette amidst the drops. Some of his projects disappear in seconds — he’s known to wrap flower petals around his hands so tight that they look like engorged flesh, and then dip his hands into a stream to watch the petals shed off and float away. Others will surely outlive him — he’s fascinated by rock walls, and will carve trenches between them in order to foster the sensation of being inside the earth — but on a long enough timeline, even those more enduring »

- David Ehrlich

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Asa Butterfield and Ellen Burstyn Star In ‘The House Of Tomorrow,’ A Sweet Retro-Futurist Coming-Of-Age Story — Sf Film Festival Review

12 April 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A mawkish coming-of-age story that marries Sundance vibes with a soft punk spirit, Peter Livolsi’s “The House of Tomorrow” never manages to flesh out its skeleton of quirks, but its heart is definitely in the right place.

Very faithfully adapted from Peter Bognanni’s 2010 novel of the same name, Livolsi’s directorial debut is — after “Brigsby Bear” and “The Space Between Us” — at least the third new film this year that falls into the beguiling sub-genre of movies about young men who’ve been raised in isolation from the rest of the world. The stranger life gets, the more we might be compelled towards portraits of people who can stand outside of civilization and offer a new perspective on the mess we’ve made (in which case, we ought to brace for this sub-genre to get a lot bigger between now and 2020).

This one begins in a geodesic dome in the woods of Minnesota, »

- David Ehrlich

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1993 | 1991

1-20 of 50 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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