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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 1999 | 1998

15 items from 2017


Jean-Pierre Léaud Speaks: How a Cinematic Icon Nearly Killed Himself for His Best Role Since ‘The 400 Blows’

31 March 2017 11:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

I was standing outside the hotel room of a movie icon, unsure quite what I would find on the find on the other side of the door. It was the final day of the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, and after a week of frantic coordinating with various schedulers, I’d finally managed to land an interview with Jean-Pierre Léaud. He had just played the lead role in “The Death of Louis Xiv,” and still endured the impact of enacting his death for the cameras. 

Léaud became one of international cinema’s most famous faces at 14, when he starred in Francois Truffaut’s seminal French New Wave debut “The 400 Blows.” As the adolescent Antoine Doinel, who spends much of the movie acting out at school and at home while witnessing the dissolution of his parents’ marriage, Léaud quickly became the defining face of angst-riddled youth. The movie’s memorable closing freeze-frame »

- Eric Kohn

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Film History Royalty: Jean-Pierre Léaud as Louis Xiv

31 March 2017 10:52 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The 400 Blows. Courtesy of ShutterstockFor many directors, casting decisions are a crucial part of the writing process. They set the parameters in which the character can develop itself. Fundamentally, a good casting decision can make a character transcend its own scripted ambitions into wonderful, unexpected territories. But bad casting, as we know, can cripple not just a character’s potential but the entire film. It’s hard to talk about casting choices as creative decisions since they are so ingrained within certain creative impulses—the decision of choosing a particular actor over another can be based on mere gut feeling, a hunch, or an intellectual response. But of course, it can also depend (as it often does in large budget films) on an actor’s status, reputation or his or her monetary value. As we get to know actors, we see them typecast or cast against type but sometimes »

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Newswire: R.I.P. Tomas Milian, Spaghetti Western star

24 March 2017 12:59 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Tomas Milian, the Cuban-born actor who made a name for himself in Italian genre movies in the 1960s and ‘70s, has died, Deadline reports. Outside of his starring roles in a number of spaghetti Westerns, Milian worked with big-name Italian directors like Michelangelo Antonioni, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Bernardo Bertolucci. In his later years, he had notable roles with American directors Steven Soderbergh and Steven Spielberg as well. The Italian news agency Ansa broke the news of Milian’s death, reporting that he had died of a stroke at home in Miami. He was 84.

Milian was born Tomás Quintín Rodríguez Milián in 1933 in Havana, the son of a general who was imprisoned during the Cuban revolution. Soon after, he moved to New York City to study acting under Lee Strasberg; he found his niche in Italy, though, where he made his big-screen debut in the Pasolini-penned The Big ...

»

- Katie Rife

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Cuban-American Actor Tomas Milian Dies Aged 84

24 March 2017 8:06 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Tomas Milian, the Cuban-American-Italian actor best known for his work in Italian genre films and Spaghetti Westerns, has died at the age of 84. Italian news agency Ansa reported that he died of a stroke in his Miami home on Wednesday. Milian, whose real name was Tomas Quintin Rodriguez Milian, worked with a host of top-notch directors such as Steven Soderbergh, Bernardo Bertolucci and Steven Spielberg, and was recognized for the emotional intensity and humor he brought… »

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Cuban-American Actor Tomas Milian, Italian Genre Movies Star, Dies at 84

24 March 2017 6:16 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Versatile Cuban-American-Italian actor Tomas Milian, known for the intensity he brought to disparate roles, whether in dramas by directors like Bernardo Bertolucci and Steven Soderbergh or as the Roman lowlife character that made him a household name in Italy, died Thursday. He was 84.

Milian died of a stroke in his Miami home, according to Italian news agency Ansa.

A Method actor who studied with Lee Strasberg, Milian played in about 120 movies during a career spanning six decades. Most of the films were shot in Italy, where he worked with directors Michelangelo Antonioni, Luchino Visconti and Pier Paolo Pasolini besides acting in Spaghetti Westerns, cop movies, and the franchise based on his Roman lowlife character “Er Monnezza” (“Mr. Trash”).

Later in his career, Milian moved to the U.S. where, among other films, he appeared in Sydney Pollack’s “Havana,” in Steven Spielberg’s “Amistad,” and played corrupt General Arturo Salazar in Soderbergh’s “Traffic, »

- Nick Vivarelli

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The Nature of Borowczyk’s Passion: Close-Up on "The Beast"

21 March 2017 12:32 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. The retrospective The Many Sins of Walerian Borowczyk is showing February 12 - June 18, 2017 in the United States and in many other countries around the world.As the reverberation of horses fervently neighing and clomping their hooves begins to permeate the opening credit soundtrack of The Beast, one may recall the similarly orchestrated donkey brays that introduce Robert Bresson’s Au hasard Balthazar (1966). Or, given its title, and the very basic concept of a young woman becoming enamored with an savage creature, one may be tempted to compare this 1975 feature to the many variations of Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve’s classic fairy tale, La belle et la bête. One would be more than a little confounded, however, by making either inadequate association. If Walerian Borowczyk’s semi-porn-semi-art-semi-monster movie bears any resemblance to another film or story, it would be »

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Psychic Scars and Something Wild: A Conversation with Dramatist, Filmmaker, and Holocaust Survivor Jack Garfein

20 March 2017 10:22 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

By strange and fortuitous coincidence, my meeting with Jack Garfein fell upon the nexus of several intersecting moments in history. It was Friday, January 27th — International Holocaust Remembrance Day. One week earlier, Donald J. Trump was sworn to office as forty-fifth President of the United States; and in the ensuing weekend, allegations of Trump’s unpunished sexual misconduct, callous attitudes toward women and courting of radical right-wing supporters helped bring about the Women’s March on Washington, one of the largest mass protests in the nation’s history. All around, people are anxiously reading the past with tenuous hopes and fears for the future. History, so often a thing defined after the fact, is currently in violent and furious motion.

Jack Garfein is living history, and he’s not shy about telling it. Born to Ukrainian Jews in 1930, Mr. Garfein personally witnessed as a child the rise of Nazi Germany »

- The Film Stage

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The Tree of Wooden Clogs

25 February 2017 12:51 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Ermanno Olmi’s three-hour saga is a masterful ethnographic recreation of the long-gone way of life of Italian tenant farmers, virtual slaves working for a landowner. We see the entire agrarian lifestyle, with hints of modern times on the way. An ever-present backdrop of spiritualism and faith keeps the laborers going. Using unprofessional actors and an obsolete dialect, this is listed as one of the great Italian films of the 1970s.

The Tree of Wooden Clogs

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 854

1978 / Color / 1:33 flat full frame / 187 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 14, 2017 / 39.95

Photographed & Edited by Ermanno Olmi

Sets: Enrico Tovaglieri

Costumes: Francesca Zucchelli

Produced by Attillio Torricelli

Written and Directed by Ermanno Olmi

 

Some filmmakers move quietly from show to show, until a project comes along that’s hailed as a career masterpiece. For Italian Ermanno Olmi the film is The Tree of Wooden Clogs (L’albero degli »

- Glenn Erickson

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Hollywood Shines at the BAFTA Awards

9 February 2017 10:15 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Prior to 1999, the British Academy Film and Television Awards were seen as the poor, but perfectly respectable, country cousin of their high-wattage American brethren. There were a number of reasons for this, chief among them the four-month time lag between U.S. and U.K. release dates, which saw a bizarre hike in prestige releases during April, when the BAFTA ceremony was traditionally held.

Until 1997, the event also included an extensive roll of television awards, which made for a long night, with the top film awards inevitably going to the same films honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences two months earlier. The BAFTAs felt stale.

In 1999, however, the BAFTAs stepped up the glamour offensive. Elizabeth Taylor was honored with a BAFTA fellowship, presented by Michael Caine, while the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow, Cate Blanchett, and Christina Ricci walked the red carpet outside North London’s dowdy Business Design Centre. »

- Damon Wise

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Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

30 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

30 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Call Me By Your Name review: A Bigger Splash director makes waves with superb gay romance

23 January 2017 3:27 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Luca Guadagnino’s masterful coming-of-age tale of an Italian fling between visiting academic Armie Hammer and professor’s son Timothée Chalamet is a major addition to the queer canon

Let’s bite right into the sweetest part of the fruit while it’s ripe. There’s a scene near the end of Luca Guadagnino’s adaptation of André Aciman’s novel Call Me By Your Name between Michael Stuhlbarg and Timothée Chalamet that is, I feel confident in saying, one of the best exchanges between father and son in the history of cinema. We’ll all be quoting from it for the rest of our lives.

For many it will be a moment of wish fulfilment, and that may go doubly for queer people whose parents tragically reject them for their nature. The scene is touching and triumphant, but it wouldn’t work on an island. It comes after a build-up, »

- Jordan Hoffman

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Walk of Fame Honoree Brett Ratner’s Love of Cinema Is a Driving Force in His Career

19 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Brett Ratner loves cinema. When speaking with the 47-year-old filmmaker, it’s abundantly clear that movies are unspooling through his veins, and if our discussions felt more like two movie buffs just enjoying great conversation, it’s because of his general enthusiasm for the medium.

“It was always my dream to direct movies,” he says, rarely pausing for a breath. “I always knew I’d do it. I had the drive and the desire. I was determined. But I never knew I’d be making movies of this size, stuff like the ‘Rush Hour’ films and ‘X-Men’ and ‘Red Dragon.’ When I was in film school, I knew I wanted to make entertaining movies. But I don’t think I could have prepared for how fast my rise would be. I was 26 when I got my first film.”

But it was before he’d set foot on a movie set »

- Nick Clement

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Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki dies aged 91

6 January 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Bielecki worked on Star Wars, Superman and Alien.

Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki has died aged 91.

Born in Lviv, Poland in 1925, Bielecki came to London after WWII to work as a photojournalist before establishing his lab Sb international in the 1960’s in order to focus on film still photography.

Working with renowned stillsmen such as Bob Penn, Johnny Jay and Tony Snowdon, Bielecki commissioned, developed and distributed photographic material for the marketing for major films of the 1970’s and 1980’s, among them The Omen, The French Connection, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 

He also worked on the first Star Wars, Superman and Alien movies as an advertising and publicity consultant. Across his career he was commissioned as a consultant by 20th Century Fox, MGM, Columbia, The Ladd Company, Universal, Walt Disney Studios and many independents.

Directors he worked with include Mel Brooks, Peter Bogdanovich, [link »

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Potographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki dies aged 91

6 January 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Bielecki worked on Star Wars, Superman and Alien.

Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki has died aged 91.

Born in Lviv, Poland in 1925, Bielecki came to London after WWII to work as a photojournalist before establishing his lab Sb international in the 1960’s in order to focus on film still photography.

Working with renowned stillsmen such as Bob Penn, Johnny Jay and Tony Snowdon, Bielecki commissioned, developed and distributed photographic material for the marketing for major films of the 1970’s and 1980’s, among them The Omen, The French Connection, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 

He also worked on the first Star Wars, Superman and Alien movies as an advertising and publicity consultant. Across his career he was commissioned as a consultant by 20th Century Fox, MGM, Columbia, The Ladd Company, Universal, Walt Disney Studios and many independents.

Directors he worked with include Mel Brooks, Peter Bogdanovich, [link »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 1999 | 1998

15 items from 2017


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