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Letter from an Unknown Woman

This devastating romantic melodrama is Max Ophüls’ best American picture — perhaps because it seems so European? It’s probably Joan Fontaine’s finest hour as well, and Louis Jourdan comes across as a great actor in a part perfect for his screen personality. The theme could be called, ‘No regrets,’ but also, ‘Everything is to be regretted.’

Letter from an Unknown Woman

Blu-ray

Olive Signature

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 87 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Joan Fontaine, Louis Jourdan, Mady Christians, Marcel Journet, Art Smith, Carol Yorke, Howard Freeman, John Good, Leo B. Pessin, Erskine Sanford, Otto Waldis, Sonja Bryden.

Cinematography: Franz Planer

Film Editor: Ted J. Kent

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Written by Howard Koch from a story by Stefan Zweig

Produced by John Houseman

Directed by Max Ophüls

A young woman’s romantic nature goes beyond all limits, probing the nature of True Love.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals
(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe This Saturday Morning

“You shouldn’t keep souvenirs of a killing. You shouldn’t have been that sentimental.”

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

Let’s state this right from the top: Vertigo is one of the greatest films ever made. It’s not simply hyperbole that notables such as Leonard Maltin and Martin Scorsese have called the film Hitchcock’s masterpiece. To paraphrase Scorsese, rarely have we seen the complexity of a man’s thoughts and feelings portrayed so beautifully and compellingly onscreen. Everything in Vertigo – from the costumes to the location scenery to the performances of its lead actors is quite simply, perfect. Hitchcock
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Will ‘Legion’ Leave a Mark This Emmy Season?

Will ‘Legion’ Leave a Mark This Emmy Season?
FX is set to premiere “Legion” Wednesday night, a new series from the mind of showrunner Noah Hawley (“Fargo”) that could make a splash in Emmy season where countless comic book shows have previously failed.

While “Game of Thrones” has certainly found its stride, genre bias has nevertheless done its part over the years to hold programs like this back when it comes to awards. But on rare occasions, a comic book title has sparked in a major category: “Batman” landed a comedy series nomination and a mention for supporting actor Frank Gorshin in 1966. “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman” was singled out for direction in 1994. Mariette Hartley even won the drama actress prize for “The Incredible Hulk” in 1979, beating out the likes of Rita Moreno (“The Rockford Files”) and Barbara Bel Geddes (“Dallas”).

The only superhero show to truly hit with the Television Academy was “Heroes,” but that was an original concept, not
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Mike Gold: The Dimension of Mind

The so-called Golden Age of Television, with its two and one-half channels of network programming, produced an astonishing number of great writers, directors and talent. To name but a very, very few: Barbara Bel Geddes, Paddy Chayefsky, George Roy Hill, Ron Howard, Ernest Kinoy, Jack Lemmon, Sidney Lumet, Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Boris Sagal, Rod Serling, Rod Steiger, Gore Vidal, Joanne Woodward… my fingers won’t hold out long enough to type even a “best-of” list.

You’ll never guess which of the above pioneers is my favorite.

When Scottish engineer John Logie Baird first demonstrated television in January 1926 (six years before Philo Farnsworth demonstrated the first electronic television), Rod Serling was just a few days over one year old. Baby boomers think we grew up with television; Mr. Serling actually has that honor. And he did a lot more with the medium than we would.

His worldview was clearly
See full article at Comicmix »

The Wrong Man

Alfred Hitchcock's true-life saga of a man wrongly accused may be Hitchcock's most troublesome movie -- all the parts work, but does it even begin to come together? Henry Fonda is the 'ordinary victim of fate' and an excellent Vera Miles is haunting as the wife who responds to the guilt and stress by withdrawing from reality. The Wrong Man Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1956 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date January 26, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony Quayle, Harold J. Stone, John Heldabrand, Doreen Lang, Norma Connolly, Lola D'Annunzio, Robert Essen, Dayton Lummis, Charles Cooper, Esther Minciotti, Laurinda Barrett, Nehemiah Persoff. Cinematography Robert Burks Art Direction Paul Sylbert Film Editor George Tomasini Original Music Bernard Herrmann Written by Maxwell Anderson and Angus MacPhail Produced and Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The Wrong Man sees Alfred Hitchcock at the end of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Remembering Kubrick Actress Gray Pt.2: From The Killing to Leech Woman and Off-Screen School Prayer Amendment Fighter

Coleen Gray in 'The Sleeping City' with Richard Conte. Coleen Gray after Fox: B Westerns and films noirs (See previous post: “Coleen Gray Actress: From Red River to Film Noir 'Good Girls'.”) Regarding the demise of her Fox career (the year after her divorce from Rod Amateau), Coleen Gray would recall for Confessions of a Scream Queen author Matt Beckoff: I thought that was the end of the world and that I was a total failure. I was a mass of insecurity and depended on agents. … Whether it was an 'A' picture or a 'B' picture didn't bother me. It could be a Western movie, a sci-fi film. A job was a job. You did the best with the script that you had. Fox had dropped Gray at a time of dramatic upheavals in the American film industry: fast-dwindling box office receipts as a result of competition from television,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dick Van Patten: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About His Long Career

Dick Van Patten: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About His Long Career
Dick Van Patten was a man who loved to work. That much is clear from a look at his eight decades in showbiz as documented in the pages of Variety.

Even when he was toplining a hit series, ABC’s “Eight is Enough,” Van Patten never stopped taking on guest shots, TV movies, specials, hosting gigs for industry events and endless fundraisers. His resume ranged from working on stage with Lunt and Fontanne in the 1940s to out-there 1970s films such as “Westworld,” “Soylent Green” and “Zachariah” to “message” TV programs such as 1979’s “Diary of a Teenage Hitchhiker” and “This One For Dad.”

Here are some little-known facts about the long and varied career of the actor who died Tuesday at the age of 86.

Van Patten’s first mention in Variety came in the Jan. 24, 1946, edition of Daily Variety in a page-one report on the return of Alfred Lunt
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Men Who Would Be Hughes (Plus Hepburn and the end of Rko)

Howard Hughes movies (photo: Leonardo DiCaprio as Howard Hughes in 'The Aviator') Turner Classic Movies will be showing the Howard Hughes-produced, John Farrow-directed, Baja California-set gangster drama His Kind of Woman, starring Robert Mitchum, Hughes discovery Jane Russell, and Vincent Price, at 3 a.m. Pt / 6 a.m. Et on Saturday, November 8, 2014. Hughes produced a couple of dozen movies. (More on that below.) But what about "Howard Hughes movies"? Or rather, movies -- whether big-screen or made-for-television efforts -- featuring the visionary, eccentric, hypochondriac, compulsive-obsessive, all-American billionaire as a character? Besides Leonardo DiCaprio, who plays a dashing if somewhat unbalanced Hughes in Martin Scorsese's 2004 Best Picture Academy Award-nominated The Aviator, other actors who have played Howard Hughes on film include the following: Tommy Lee Jones in William A. Graham's television movie The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), with Lee Purcell as silent film star Billie Dove, Tovah Feldshuh as Katharine Hepburn,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

New on Video: ‘Caught’

Caught

Directed by Max Ophüls

Written by Arthur Laurents

USA, 1949

Max Ophüls’ third feature in America, Caught, from 1949, is an evocative amalgam of a domesticated melodramatic tragedy and a dynamic film noir sensibility. The picture stars Barbara Bel Geddes as Leonora Eames, a studious adherent to charm school principles who dreams of becoming a glamorous model, or at least marrying a young, handsome millionaire. She gets the latter when she meets Smith Ohlrig (Robert Ryan), a wealthy “international something” who gives her the superficial materials she desires but little else. Their marriage is an arduous sham. He works late hours on unclear projects while she is left to dwell uselessly in their extravagant mansion. He’s cruel to her and careless. A way out of the stifling relationship comes in the form of a job as a doctor’s receptionist. Leonora leaves Ohlrig and moves into Manhattan, where she eventually
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Caught (1949)

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: July 8, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Barbara Bel Geddes and James Mason are Caught.

The 1949 film noir drama Caught directed by the great Max Ophuls (Lola Montes, The Earrings of Madame D…) makes its U.S. DVD and Blu-ray debut courtesy of Olive Films.

Caught is a tale of Leonora (Barbara Bel Geddes, Vertigo), an aspiring carhop who meets and marries a mysterious millionaire, Smith Ohlrig (Robert Ryan, God’s Little Acre). Soon after the wedding, Laura realizes she’s trapped in a loveless marriage with a ruthless workaholic husband who torments her with twisted mind games. Unable to obtain a divorce from Smith, she moves out of the mansion and goes to work for a dedicated doctor, Larry Quinada (James Mason, Bigger Than Life). The two quickly fall in love but the romance comes to an abrupt halt when Leonora learns that she is pregnant with Ohlrig’s child…
See full article at Disc Dish »

Interview with Annette Bening, Arie Posin, Ed Harris and Annette Insdorf about The Face Of Love

The Face Of Love - Annette Bening, Ed Harris, director Arie Posin with Annette Insdorf at the Paley Center For Media Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Face Of Love is the story of a man and his double and questions what it is that we love in another's face. Annette Bening plays Nicki, a woman whose job it is to stage houses in Los Angeles so that they seem lived in for prospective buyers. Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo casts long shadows over the scenery and director Arie Posin, with deft strokes, uses them as mirror and deceit. "In pursuit of the past" is more than the title of an art exhibition. Ed Harris plays a double role (husband Garret and lover-painter Tom); he is Kim Novak to Annette Bening's James Stewart. A neighbor played by Robin Williams takes over for Barbara Bel Geddes in the unrequited love department. "I love the way you look at me,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Watch: 30-Minute Documentary 'Obsessed With Vertigo' About The Making & Restoration Of Alfred Hitchcock's Masterpiece

Last year, a bit of a cinematic dust-up occurred when Sight & Sound released their once-a-decade list of Greatest Movies Of All Time. Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" had long dominated the top tier, but 2012 saw the film drop to the second slot, to be replaced by Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo" as the best movie ever. Of course, such rankings are a bit silly, but that didn't stop film fans from discussing the merits of both, but we think it's safe to say—they're both great. But if you need a little more to convince you just how much Hitchcock's film needs to be treasured, you might want to take a look below. The 30-minute documentary "Obsessed With Vertigo" has landed online and it's well worth a spin. The American Movie Classics production brings together a bunch of folks—Barbara Bel Geddes, Henry Bumstead, Robert A. Harris, Patricia Hitchcock, James C. Katz,
See full article at The Playlist »

Alfred Hitchcock San Francisco: Guided tour through the sites of Hitchcock’s movies The San Francisco Silent Film Festival has arranged for San Francisco City Guides to lead "a special, Sfsff-only edition" of its "Alfred Hitchcock’s San Francisco" guided walking tour. This particular two-hour Hitchcock tour will begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 15, atop Nob Hill. From there, the tour will visit the sites of three Hitchcock films: Vertigo, The Birds, and Family Plot. (Photo: Alfred Hitchcock ca. 1960.) The San Francisco Silent Film Festival press release adds that Alfred Hitchcock tour participants will "have plenty of time" to go from the tour’s end at Union Square to the Castro Theatre so as to catch the 1:00 pm screening of Hitchcock’s 1928 silent Champagne. Note: Space for this special "Alfred Hitchcock’s San Francisco" tour is limited. Registration is free — though donations are encouraged — and will be done on a first-come,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘Panic in the Streets’ – a taught, suspenseful thriller

Panic in the Streets

Written by Richard Murphy and Daniel Fuchs

Directed by Elia Kazan

U.S.A., 1950

-

Some directors make their careers by telling the sort of stories and using the cinematic techniques which best suit them. This lack of diversity is by no means sufficient grounds for criticism. In fact, it is often quite the contrary insofar as such directors are often (but not always) heralded as important voices for specific genres and styles. Harmony Korine explores the oft avoided subcultures of the United States, John Carpenter’s greater strengths lie in sharing thriller and horror tales and Elia Kazan’s most famous and respected projects were those which directly concentrated on critical social issues affecting the United States during this time, issues which far too many preferred to either shove under the rug or virulently disagreed to reach compromise on. Gentleman’s Agreement, Pinky and On the Waterfront come to mind.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Panic in the Streets’ has director Elia Kazan offer pure thrills and chills

Panic in the Streets

Written by Richard Murphy and Daniel Fuchs

Directed by Elia Kazan

U.S.A., 1950

-

Some directors make their careers by telling the sort of stories and using the cinematic techniques which best suit them. This lack of diversity is by no means sufficient grounds for criticism. In fact, it is often quite the contrary insofar as such directors are often (but not always) heralded as important voices for specific genres and styles. Harmony Korine explores the oft avoided subcultures of the United States, John Carpenter’s greater strengths lie in sharing thriller and horror tales and Elia Kazan’s most famous and respected projects were those which directly concentrated on critical social issues affecting the United States during this time, issues which far too many preferred to either shove under the rug or virulently disagreed to reach compromise on. Gentleman’s Agreement, Pinky and On the Waterfront come to mind.
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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