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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 29 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Ten Great Performances from Mike Nichols' Films

21 November 2014 7:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Amir here. Mike Nichols was a true giant of show business, with a career that lasted more than six decades and sprawled across many different media and genres. Nathaniel's heartfelt eulogy already highlighted the dreamy number of classics he directed and the collaborations with Meryl Streep that resulted in some of her most memorable roles; but Meryl wasn't the only performer whom Nichols guided to career-best work.

Team Experience decided to make a list of ten great performances from Mike Nichols' films; we were truly spoilt for choice. If you want a testament to the man's sheer brilliance and chemistry with his actors, look no further than the missing names from our list. An equally long, equally illustrious alternative list can be made of the likes of Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate, Melanie Griffith in Working Girl, Philip Seymour Hoffman in Charlie Wilson's War, Jude Law and Natalie Portman in Closer, »

- Amir S.

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Mike Nichols: 5 Must-See Movies

20 November 2014 3:40 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

A movie by Mike Nichols is typically an elegant, unruffled ride across a smooth, even chilly surface - the movie's value glints upward from beneath that ice. The director, who died Wednesday at 83, over the years pared down any attempt at visual flourish - The Graduate, his groundbreaking early film that remains his most famous, is probably also one of his flashiest. What fired him up, what he bored down into, was the intellectual germ (or gem) of the story. This meant that he was willing to consider anything for his camera: erotic werewolves (Wolf), World War II (Catch-22), philandering »

- Tom Gliatto, @gliattoT

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TCM to remember Mike Nichols with film tribute

20 November 2014 1:53 PM, PST | ChannelGuideMag | See recent ChannelGuideMag news »

Famed director Mike Nichols passed away yesterday at the age of 83. One of the few artists to have earned Oscar, Tony, Emmy and Grammy accolades, Nichols will be remembered by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) with a three-film tribute on Dec. 6, featuring Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), The Graduate (1967) and Carnal Knowledge (1971). TCM Remembers Mike Nichols — Saturday, Dec. 6 (All Times Et) 8pm: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Sandy Dennis and George Segal 10:30pm: The Graduate – starring Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross, Murray Hamilton, William Daniels and … Continue reading →

The post TCM to remember Mike Nichols with film tribute appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine. »

- Jeff Pfeiffer

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Mike Nichols Movies: 18 Essential Films You Should Watch Right Now

20 November 2014 8:30 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Few directors can be said to have changed the way films are made, but Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday at 83, was one of them. His first film, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966), ended decades of Hollywood censorship of adult content and freed the movies for mature language and subject matter ever after. His second film, "The Graduate," was the first serious mainstream movie to feature a rock soundtrack (spawning Simon and Garfunkel's hit "Mrs. Robinson") and, through its casting of Dustin Hoffman, expanded Hollywood's notion of what a leading man ought to look and sound like.

Nichols wasn't born in America (he and his family escaped from Nazi Germany when he was a child), but he was one of the best chroniclers of contemporary America -- its politics, its aspirations, its dreams, its aristocracy, and its successes and failures -- in movies. His youth in Manhattan as the son »

- Gary Susman

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Oscar & Tony Winning Director Mike Nichols Dead At 83

20 November 2014 4:41 AM, PST | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Legendary film and theater director, writer and producer Mike Nichols has passed away. An Oscar winner for 1967′s seminal The Graduate, he also was nominated for such films as Working Girl, Silkwood and Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? For his stage work, he amassed 10 Tony Awards including as director for such plays as Barefoot In The Park, The Odd Couple, The Prisoner Of Second Avenue and Death Of A Salesman; and as producer of Annie and The Real Thing.

William Goldman said there were two great American film directors—Elia Kazan and Mike Nichols,” said Broadway producer Emanuel Azenberg, who co-produced Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing with Nichols, who also staged ythe play’s Tony-winning Broadway edition with Glenn Close and Jeremy Irons. “I think that’s true. He was a giant who could convince people to be better than they were.”

Nichols died suddenly late Wednesday night »

- The Deadline Team

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The Graduate director Mike Nichols dies, aged 83

20 November 2014 4:08 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director Mike Nichols has died at the age of 83.

Nichols won the Best Director Oscar for his 1967 comedy drama The Graduate, which starred Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft.

A note from president of ABC News James Goldston to staff confirmed that Nichols, the husband of former ABC World News anchor Diane Sawyer, died suddenly on Wednesday evening (November 19).

"In a triumphant career that spanned over six decades, Mike created some of the most iconic works of American film, television and theatre - an astonishing canon ranging from The Graduate, Working Girl, and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf to Closer, Charlie Wilson's War, Annie, Spamalot, The Birdcage, and Angels in America," Goldston said.

"He was a true visionary, winning the highest honors in the arts for his work as a director, writer, producer and comic and was one of a tiny few to win the Egot - an Emmy, a Grammy, »

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AFI Taps 13 Execs as Mentors for Women-Directors Workshop

7 October 2014 3:43 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The American Film Institute Directing Workshop for Women has created an “Executive Circle,” consisting of 13 execs who will act as mentors to filmmakers there.

The Executive Circle consists of Lauren Abrahams, VP, Sony; Amanda Brown, VP, Paramount; Daria Cercek, VP, Fox; Tonia Davis, director of development, Disney; Maradith Frenkel, VP, Universal; Niija Kuykendall, VP, Warner Bros.; Annie Laks, VP, Paramount Animation; Alana Mayo, Ce, Paramount; Anikah McLaren, VP, Universal; Chantal Nong, VP, Warner Bros.; Sara Scott, Director of Development, Universal; Alison Small, VP, Paramount/Paramount Insurge; and Erin Westerman, VP, Good Universe

They will provides mentorship to participants both in Dww and the AFI Conservatory. The women will offer guidance about the studio system, how projects are greenlit, advice on taking notes, and the role of the studio executive. This  program is part of an industry commitment to lessen the gap of female directors in film and TV.

Since the workshop’s inception, »

- Tim Gray

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AFI Taps 13 Execs as Mentors for Women-Directors Workshop

7 October 2014 3:43 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The American Film Institute Directing Workshop for Women has created an “Executive Circle,” consisting of 13 execs who will act as mentors to filmmakers there.

The Executive Circle consists of Lauren Abrahams, VP, Sony; Amanda Brown, VP, Paramount; Daria Cercek, VP, Fox; Tonia Davis, director of development, Disney; Maradith Frenkel, VP, Universal; Niija Kuykendall, VP, Warner Bros.; Annie Laks, VP, Paramount Animation; Alana Mayo, Ce, Paramount; Anikah McLaren, VP, Universal; Chantal Nong, VP, Warner Bros.; Sara Scott, Director of Development, Universal; Alison Small, VP, Paramount/Paramount Insurge; and Erin Westerman, VP, Good Universe

They will provides mentorship to participants both in Dww and the AFI Conservatory. The women will offer guidance about the studio system, how projects are greenlit, advice on taking notes, and the role of the studio executive. This  program is part of an industry commitment to lessen the gap of female directors in film and TV.

Since the workshop’s inception, »

- Tim Gray

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Sopranos Actress Bergen, the Movies' '1st Female President' of the United States, Dead at 84

20 September 2014 1:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Polly Bergen dead at 84: ‘First woman president of the U.S.A.,’ former mistress of Tony Soprano’s father Emmy Award-winning actress Polly Bergen — whose roles ranged from the first U.S.A. woman president in Kisses for My President to the former mistress of both Tony Soprano’s father and John F. Kennedy in the television hit series The Sopranos — died from "natural causes" on September 20, 2014, at her home in Southbury, Connecticut. The 84-year-old Bergen, a heavy smoker for five decades, had been suffering from emphysema and other ailments since the 1990s. "Most people think I was born in a rich Long Island family," she told The Washington Post in 1988, but Polly Bergen was actually born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, to an impoverished family in Knoxville, Tennessee. Her father was an illiterate construction worker while her mother got only as far as the third grade. The family »

- Andre Soares

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Gardner, Crawford Among Academy's Career Achievement Award Non-Winners

4 September 2014 3:08 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Award: Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth among dozens of women bypassed by the Academy (photo: Honorary Award non-winner Gloria Swanson in 'Sunset Blvd.') (See previous post: "Honorary Oscars: Doris Day, Danielle Darrieux Snubbed.") Part three of this four-part article about the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Award bypassing women basically consists of a long, long — and for the most part quite prestigious — list of deceased women who, some way or other, left their mark on the film world. Some of the names found below are still well known; others were huge in their day, but are now all but forgotten. Yet, just because most people (and the media) suffer from long-term — and even medium-term — memory loss, that doesn't mean these women were any less deserving of an Honorary Oscar. So, among the distinguished female film professionals in Hollywood and elsewhere who have passed away without »

- Andre Soares

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Faye Dunaway To Open France’s Lumiere Fest

27 August 2014 3:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Following in the footsteps of Jean-Paul Belmondo, Faye Dunaway will open France’s 6th Lumiere- Grand Lyon Festival, attending for an opening evening gala screening of Arthur Penn’s 1967 modern classic “Bonnie and Clyde,” where she stars with Warren Beatty and Gene Hackman.

Taking place Oct. 13, the opening gala will take place at Lyon’s massive Halle Tony Garnier, with a restored Warner Bros. copy of “Bonnie and Clyde,” and much of the crème of the French film industry and around 5,000 spectators in attendance.

In a brief statement Wednesday, Dunaway said she was very touched by the invitation to a festival for film-lovers. Run by the Lumiere Institute’s Bertrand Tavernier and Thierry Fremaux, the Lumiere Festival, which only screens restorations, revivals and re-issues, noted Dunaway’s “immense contribution” to the emergence of U.S. independent cinema in the 1960s and ‘70s, citing a swathe of titles that Dunaway went »

- John Hopewell

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AFI Expands Workshop for Women Directors

21 August 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The AFI Directing Workshop for Women will expand this year, with participants creating content for the web or streaming devices. This expands on the 40-year-old program, which has centered on the making of short films.

The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation has provided sponsorship for this year’s initiatives, along with NBCUniversal. The Wjsff will support a participant who has a diverse voice, to nurture and create opportunities for new female filmmakers.

AFI Dww offers a tuition-free training program to women who have established themselves in the arts. The program includes classroom learning, hands-on production experience and the opportunity to direct a project and advance their careers as visual storytellers.  This year, the program will accept a total of eight participants. The application is available at afi.com.

In making the announcement, AFI said, “While great strides have been made to lessen the gap of working female directors in the film community, »

- Tim Gray

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Film Review: ‘Marie’s Story’

14 August 2014 3:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Born five years after Helen Keller in Vertou, France, Marie Heurtin faced many of the same challenges, growing up deaf and blind in a society whose instinct was to institutionalize such girls. “Marie’s Story,” therefore, is not so different from Keller’s, amounting to a French “Miracle Worker” with the bonus miracle that it was a nun who accomplished the inspirational breakthrough. Acquired by Film Movement in advance of its Locarno Film Festival premiere, this compelling 19th-century drama offers slight but satisfying variations on one of American drama’s best-loved tales, spelling awards heft abroad and sleeper potential Stateside.

Whereas every American child knows how Keller learned to communicate, thanks to her autobiography and the 1962 film, Heurtin’s story isn’t widely known in France — nor is the unfortunate meme of off-color jokes schoolchildren make concerning Keller’s twin handicaps. That should make for a relatively pure viewing experience abroad, »

- Peter Debruge

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Gorilla at Large

5 August 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Talk about descriptive titles! This generic little indie, set in a Long Beach amusement park terrorized by an escaped gorilla, was one of only three 3-D productions released by 20th Century-Fox in the fifties. It benefits from an unusually good cast including Oscar nominee Lee J. Cobb (the same year he made On the Waterfront!) and contract player Anne Bancroft, who probably didn't include this one on her resume. George Barrows fills out the ape suit a year after playing the diving helmet-headed gorilla in Robot Monster.

The post Gorilla at Large appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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Famous Movie Posters

26 July 2014 7:35 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It would have been thrilling to have been around in the 70s to witness those foreboding billboards for the Exorcist, or the disconcerting adverts for Alien, at a time when a sense of ‘the other’ was probably more acute.

Let’s face it, movie posters constitute some of the most iconic art works of our times; formerly adorning the facades of picture houses and now propagated through endless multi-media channels due to cinema’s enduring presence at the heart of popular culture.

A good movie poster needs to invoke a sense of intrigue in the viewer. Modern horror movie posters often opt for disturbing images, which force the viewer to register the image rather than the way the Exorcist conveyed a sense of eeriness and subtlety, coercing the viewer into the films trap.

Remember some of those truly iconic billboards like Vertigo with the falling man inside the Spirograph. It »

- Guest Guest

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What's your favourite Sandra Bullock movie? Digital Spy staff picks

26 July 2014 1:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Many happy returns to Sandra Bullock, who celebrates her 50th birthday today!

The one-time action movie sidekick and Hollywood's favourite funny girl, Bullock has gradually refashioned herself as a bona fide A-lister thanks to her Oscar-winning turn in The Blind Side and last year's box office smash Gravity.

With such an eclectic back catalogue it's hard to single out any one movie. With that in mind, Digital Spy opened up the floor to staff to pose one simple question: What's your favourite Sandra Bullock movie? Here are the results...

Emma Dibdin, Features Editor - The Net

In the interest of full disclosure, I will say that it's been a good ten years since I last watched The Net. Viewing it now, in the cold light of the 21st century, it has not dated well. But aside from being hugely entertaining with a plot that falls just the right side of ludicrous, »

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These Actresses Were Way Too Young to Play Movie Mothers

2 July 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Here’s how rough Hollywood can be on older women: In the new comedy Tammy, Susan Sarandon is cast as Melissa McCarthy’s grandmother, despite the fact that only 24 years separate them in age. This isn’t the first time an actress has seemed way too young to sire her screen kin (in one classic case, Anne Bancroft was only eight years older than her The Graduate screen-daughter Katharine Ross), and it’s not even the most egregious example in Tammy, where McCarthy also cast the 11-years-older Allison Janney as her mother. This sort of thing happens all the time to actresses — once they reach a certain age, it's like they're filed away in a folder simply marked "old" — and it’s a problem their male counterparts rarely have to contend with. To prove it, we’ve rounded up some recent examples of age-inappropriate casting, then imagined what would happen »

- Kyle Buchanan

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Get into the Habit: The Top 10 Movie Nuns on the Big Screen

24 June 2014 1:53 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Spirituality in cinema has been expressed in various ways where the feel-good aspect of faith-based films are put to great use for emotional manipulation. The triumph and tragedy of religious themes in the movies have never been championed as much as when the protagonist at the helm is a loving nun. Film nuns come in all varieties: nurturing, helpful, complex, obstinate, crusading and flawed.

Get into the Habit: The Top 10 Movie Nuns on the Big Screen will take a look at some of the movies most colorful and notable women of the cloth. You decide…will these God-serving maidens give you a sense of uplifting forethought?

Get into the Habit: The Top 10 Movie Nuns on the Big Screen selections are (in alphabetical order according to film title):

1.)  Sister Agnes from Agnes of God (1985)

An unlikely religious murder mystery surrounds a novice nun in Sister Agnes (Meg Tilly) as questions »

- Frank Ochieng

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Can Sony Classics land two Best Actor nominations for 'Foxcatcher?'

20 May 2014 11:43 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I was glued to the Twitter application of my iPhone Sunday night waiting for the reactions to Bennett Miller's "Foxcatcher" to roll in as the film bowed in Competition at the Cannes Film Festival. It was interesting to watch the first wave of knee-jerks, all of them just a touch muted, I assume because Miller is not a filmmaker whose movies hit you right away. They kind of seep into you the more you spin away from them, and I got the feeling "Foxcatcher" is absolutely one such example. We were all more or less expecting something special out of Steve Carell here. From photos and that early trailer that slipped out last fall, it was clear he had undergone a transformation for the role of multimillionaire murderer John du Pont, both physically and professionally. And indeed, all indications are that it is a career-altering portrayal. Here's one juicy »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Mel Brooks discusses 'Blazing Saddles,' Brooksfilms, and the best screening ever

12 May 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

So the phone rings, and I answer it, and it's Mel Brooks. That's an actual thing that happened. That's now something I can say. And even better, the 40 minute conversation that followed me answering the phone is one of my favorites in recent memory. How often do you get to talk to a comedy legend about one of the pinnacle moments of not only their career, but of film comedy in general? I was told I'd have about 15 minutes originally. Time was tight. And if you get offered 15 minutes to talk to Mel Brooks about "Blazing Saddles," you take it, right? We ended up having a really fun back and forth about that film, about films he's produced, about his partnership with Gene Wilder, and about the ways Hollywood failed the great Richard Pryor. The only reason we wrapped it up is because we had to, and it would have »

- Drew McWeeny

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

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