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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

18 items from 2014


AFI Expands Workshop for Women Directors

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The AFI Directing Workshop for Women will expand this year, with participants creating content for the web or streaming devices. This expands on the 40-year-old program, which has centered on the making of short films.

The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation has provided sponsorship for this year’s initiatives, along with NBCUniversal. The Wjsff will support a participant who has a diverse voice, to nurture and create opportunities for new female filmmakers.

AFI Dww offers a tuition-free training program to women who have established themselves in the arts. The program includes classroom learning, hands-on production experience and the opportunity to direct a project and advance their careers as visual storytellers.  This year, the program will accept a total of eight participants. The application is available at afi.com.

In making the announcement, AFI said, “While great strides have been made to lessen the gap of working female directors in the film community, »

- Tim Gray

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Film Review: ‘Marie’s Story’

14 August 2014 3:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Born five years after Helen Keller in Vertou, France, Marie Heurtin faced many of the same challenges, growing up deaf and blind in a society whose instinct was to institutionalize such girls. “Marie’s Story,” therefore, is not so different from Keller’s, amounting to a French “Miracle Worker” with the bonus miracle that it was a nun who accomplished the inspirational breakthrough. Acquired by Film Movement in advance of its Locarno Film Festival premiere, this compelling 19th-century drama offers slight but satisfying variations on one of American drama’s best-loved tales, spelling awards heft abroad and sleeper potential Stateside.

Whereas every American child knows how Keller learned to communicate, thanks to her autobiography and the 1962 film, Heurtin’s story isn’t widely known in France — nor is the unfortunate meme of off-color jokes schoolchildren make concerning Keller’s twin handicaps. That should make for a relatively pure viewing experience abroad, »

- Peter Debruge

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Gorilla at Large

5 August 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Talk about descriptive titles! This generic little indie, set in a Long Beach amusement park terrorized by an escaped gorilla, was one of only three 3-D productions released by 20th Century-Fox in the fifties. It benefits from an unusually good cast including Oscar nominee Lee J. Cobb (the same year he made On the Waterfront!) and contract player Anne Bancroft, who probably didn't include this one on her resume. George Barrows fills out the ape suit a year after playing the diving helmet-headed gorilla in Robot Monster.

The post Gorilla at Large appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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Famous Movie Posters

26 July 2014 7:35 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It would have been thrilling to have been around in the 70s to witness those foreboding billboards for the Exorcist, or the disconcerting adverts for Alien, at a time when a sense of ‘the other’ was probably more acute.

Let’s face it, movie posters constitute some of the most iconic art works of our times; formerly adorning the facades of picture houses and now propagated through endless multi-media channels due to cinema’s enduring presence at the heart of popular culture.

A good movie poster needs to invoke a sense of intrigue in the viewer. Modern horror movie posters often opt for disturbing images, which force the viewer to register the image rather than the way the Exorcist conveyed a sense of eeriness and subtlety, coercing the viewer into the films trap.

Remember some of those truly iconic billboards like Vertigo with the falling man inside the Spirograph. It »

- Guest Guest

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What's your favourite Sandra Bullock movie? Digital Spy staff picks

26 July 2014 1:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Many happy returns to Sandra Bullock, who celebrates her 50th birthday today!

The one-time action movie sidekick and Hollywood's favourite funny girl, Bullock has gradually refashioned herself as a bona fide A-lister thanks to her Oscar-winning turn in The Blind Side and last year's box office smash Gravity.

With such an eclectic back catalogue it's hard to single out any one movie. With that in mind, Digital Spy opened up the floor to staff to pose one simple question: What's your favourite Sandra Bullock movie? Here are the results...

Emma Dibdin, Features Editor - The Net

In the interest of full disclosure, I will say that it's been a good ten years since I last watched The Net. Viewing it now, in the cold light of the 21st century, it has not dated well. But aside from being hugely entertaining with a plot that falls just the right side of ludicrous, »

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These Actresses Were Way Too Young to Play Movie Mothers

2 July 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Here’s how rough Hollywood can be on older women: In the new comedy Tammy, Susan Sarandon is cast as Melissa McCarthy’s grandmother, despite the fact that only 24 years separate them in age. This isn’t the first time an actress has seemed way too young to sire her screen kin (in one classic case, Anne Bancroft was only eight years older than her The Graduate screen-daughter Katharine Ross), and it’s not even the most egregious example in Tammy, where McCarthy also cast the 11-years-older Allison Janney as her mother. This sort of thing happens all the time to actresses — once they reach a certain age, it's like they're filed away in a folder simply marked "old" — and it’s a problem their male counterparts rarely have to contend with. To prove it, we’ve rounded up some recent examples of age-inappropriate casting, then imagined what would happen »

- Kyle Buchanan

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Get into the Habit: The Top 10 Movie Nuns on the Big Screen

24 June 2014 1:53 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Spirituality in cinema has been expressed in various ways where the feel-good aspect of faith-based films are put to great use for emotional manipulation. The triumph and tragedy of religious themes in the movies have never been championed as much as when the protagonist at the helm is a loving nun. Film nuns come in all varieties: nurturing, helpful, complex, obstinate, crusading and flawed.

Get into the Habit: The Top 10 Movie Nuns on the Big Screen will take a look at some of the movies most colorful and notable women of the cloth. You decide…will these God-serving maidens give you a sense of uplifting forethought?

Get into the Habit: The Top 10 Movie Nuns on the Big Screen selections are (in alphabetical order according to film title):

1.)  Sister Agnes from Agnes of God (1985)

An unlikely religious murder mystery surrounds a novice nun in Sister Agnes (Meg Tilly) as questions »

- Frank Ochieng

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Can Sony Classics land two Best Actor nominations for 'Foxcatcher?'

20 May 2014 11:43 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I was glued to the Twitter application of my iPhone Sunday night waiting for the reactions to Bennett Miller's "Foxcatcher" to roll in as the film bowed in Competition at the Cannes Film Festival. It was interesting to watch the first wave of knee-jerks, all of them just a touch muted, I assume because Miller is not a filmmaker whose movies hit you right away. They kind of seep into you the more you spin away from them, and I got the feeling "Foxcatcher" is absolutely one such example. We were all more or less expecting something special out of Steve Carell here. From photos and that early trailer that slipped out last fall, it was clear he had undergone a transformation for the role of multimillionaire murderer John du Pont, both physically and professionally. And indeed, all indications are that it is a career-altering portrayal. Here's one juicy »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Mel Brooks discusses 'Blazing Saddles,' Brooksfilms, and the best screening ever

12 May 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

So the phone rings, and I answer it, and it's Mel Brooks. That's an actual thing that happened. That's now something I can say. And even better, the 40 minute conversation that followed me answering the phone is one of my favorites in recent memory. How often do you get to talk to a comedy legend about one of the pinnacle moments of not only their career, but of film comedy in general? I was told I'd have about 15 minutes originally. Time was tight. And if you get offered 15 minutes to talk to Mel Brooks about "Blazing Saddles," you take it, right? We ended up having a really fun back and forth about that film, about films he's produced, about his partnership with Gene Wilder, and about the ways Hollywood failed the great Richard Pryor. The only reason we wrapped it up is because we had to, and it would have »

- Drew McWeeny

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Six of the Best: Ambiguous Movie Endings

2 April 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Cinema has a habit of putting us through a bout of emotional turbulence dependent on genre: quite understandably, horror films scare whilst comedy films make you laugh (if the film is successful in their intentions, mind). But every so often, there is one element which rears its head, regardless of genre, that is best deployed in the final scene… ambiguity. Capable of both blindsiding an audience or simply confusing them, opting to shroud a film’s climax with a cloak of uncertainty is a brave filmmaking decision, and one that can break everything that has come before it.

Below, I count through six examples of how an ambiguous final scene can prove an undoubted success, opening the ending up to countless interpretations that will be mulled over forever more.

And hey – be careful out there…

 Let’s kick off with The Graduate (1967)

Mike Nichols’ seminal 1967 classic sees Dustin Hoffman’s »

- Jacob Stolworthy

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The Definitive Religious Movies: 40-31

31 March 2014 8:11 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Part 2 of this list gets a bit more foreign. In fact, this may be the first full list that has more foreign-language films than English-language ones. Maybe English-speaking audiences aren’t as willing to watch religious films. Maybe films associated with religion come off as preachy or accusatory. Or maybe (most of) the films on this list have done it so well already that it doesn’t need to be done again.

courtesy of criterion.com

40. Marketa Lazarová (1967)

Directed by František Vláčil

The film often credited as being the best to come out of the Czech Republic, Marketa Lazarová was based on the novel by Vladislav Vančura and is an early, biting narrative about the chasm of difference between paganism and its shift into Christianity in the Middle Ages, as the daughter of a lord is kidnapped and becomes the mistress of one of her kidnappers, a robber knight. It »

- Joshua Gaul

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AFI Award Winner and One of Australia's Top Actresses Has Died: Wendy Hughes

8 March 2014 5:59 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Australian actress Wendy Hughes dead at 61 (photo: Wendy Hughes in ‘Newsfront’) Australian film, television, and stage actress Wendy Hughes, best known internationally for the big-screen dramas My Brilliant Career and Careful, He Might Hear You, died of cancer early today, March 8, 2014, in Sydney. Hughes (born on July 29, 1952, in Melbourne) was 61. Wendy Hughes’ film career kicked off in the mid-’70s, with Tim Burstall’s psychological drama ‘Jock’ Petersen / Petersen (1974), in which she plays the wife of a college professor who becomes romantically involved with a married student (Jack Thompson). "I spent a lot of the time naked and doing sex scenes," Hughes would later recall about her work in ‘Jock’ Petersen, "because in the seventies you all had to do that." In 1979, Hughes landed a key supporting role in the international arthouse hit My Brilliant Career, Gillian Armstrong’s late 19th-century-set tale of an independent-minded young woman (a Katharine Hepburn »

- Andre Soares

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Linksy

7 March 2014 7:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

TV Blend Mad Men Season 7 key art features a famous graphic designer - April 13th, y'all

My New Plaid Pants first pic of Dane Dehaan as James Dean in yet another bio of the actor

/Film gross... the proposed reboot of Zorro is going to be Dark Knight-esque. Good god, Hollywood, be smarter. Anyone interested in Zorro, its own brand which is why you're rebooting it, is going to expect light swashbuckling Fun.  

New Now Next Teen Wolf adding a third gay character for season 4. (Weird that they haven't expanded the opening credits sequence to feature the other regulars from the ever expanding show.)

Towleroad RuPaul teaches his Pit Crew to "Sissy That Walk"

Guardian Idris Elba providing the voice of Shere Khan in the new live action/CGI Jungle Book

Fashionista costume designer extraordinaire Janie Bryant on what's next for her after Mad Men wraps

i09 on 30 cult movies everyone should see once. »

- NATHANIEL R

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Watch: Katharine Hepburn, Olivia de Havilland, Grace Kelly & Anne Bancroft Present First 40 Years Of Oscar History

7 March 2014 1:55 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Following Sunday's Oscars, which was one of the highest rated shows in recent memory, we had a few suggestions on how things could be improved next year. And one of those ideas was killing the montages or basically anything extraneous that doesn't have any bearing on the matter at hand—handing out awards. And we doubt that will happen if only because the Oscar show is built on pageantry, celebration of its own achievements and more, and that was the case even way back in the day when Bob Hope was hosting. A newly released nine-minute reel takes us back to 1967 and the 40th Academy Awards, where Best Actress winners Katharine Hepburn, Olivia de Havilland, Grace Kelly and Anne Bancroft were brought in to share different portions of four decades of Oscar history. Each actress tackles a different decade, sharing the memorable films and performances that marked those years. So »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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News Nuggets: Is it Ok for Ellen to make jokes about slavery at the Oscars?

20 February 2014 5:59 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Steve Pond addresses an interesting topic regarding this year's Oscar ceremony: Is it Ok to joke about slavery? He mentions that BAFTA's Stephen Fry is the latest comedian/host to try and make light of the issue. Unfortunately, the "tricky lesson" he learned is that making jokes about "12 Years a Slave" is "at your own peril." He concludes with "the ball's in your court, Ellen DeGeneres," and that "you have to tread very, very carefully" as the next Academy Awards host on March 2. The Wrap. Pete Hammond looks back on the historic 50th anniversary of Sidney Poitier's Oscar win in 1964. He says "it is particularly appropriate to recall Poitier's win this year, as 2013 was significant for the number of acclaimed films revolving around the black experience." When Anne Bancroft opened the envelope and announced his name for the 1963 film "Lilies of the Field," it had already been 24 years since »

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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1

9 February 2014 9:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Well, we’ve finally reached the summit: the 10 most definitive romantic comedies of all time. Unlike the other sections of this list, there is not a movie here that approaches “bad.” As always, some are better than others, despite the order. But one thing is for sure: if you plan to have a rom-com binge-a-thon soon, this is where you start, no questions asked. In fact, after reading this, you should go do that and report back.

courtesy of reverseshot.com

10. Some Like It Hot (1959)

What’s funnier than men dressing in drag? Depends on who you ask. It’s Billy Wilder again with a fictional story of two musicians – Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) – who witness the St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Chicago and leave town. But, since the mob has ties everywhere, they need to disguise themselves as best they can: as women in an »

- Joshua Gaul

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86th Academy Awards: Streep Shatters Nominations Record

16 January 2014 3:56 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Meryl Streep breaks Oscar record: Oscar 2014 nominations (photo: Meryl Streep in ‘August: Osage County’) The 2014 Oscar nominations were announced earlier today at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs and Thor: The Dark World and Snow White and the Huntsman actor Chris Hemsworth — whose Rush was completely shut out — made the announcements, including that of Best Actress contender Meryl Streep, in the running for her performance in John WellsAugust: Osage County. Streep’s competitors are her Doubt and Julie & Julia co-star Amy Adams for David O. Russell’s American Hustle, Sandra Bullock for Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity, Judi Dench for Stephen FrearsPhilomena, and likely winner Cate Blanchett for Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine. (Emma Thompson’s absence from the Best Actress roster — for her performance in John Lee Hancock’s Saving Mr. Banks — was quite a surprise. »

- Steve Montgomery

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Ted Richmond, Producer of ‘Papillon,’ Dies at 103

6 January 2014 5:59 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Producer Ted Richmond, who produced more than 60 movies from the 1940s through the 1970s including 1973 thriller “Papillon” (pictured), died in Paris on Dec. 23. He was 103.

The 1973 hit “Papillon,” starring Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman, was one of Richmond’s most successful films.

For 40 years, working for Columbia Pictures and then Universal Intl., he produced movies in a variety of genres. There were Westerns such as “The Cimarron Kid,” starring Audie Murphy, and “Return of the Seven,” as well as comedies such as “Francis Joins the Wacs,” starring Donald O’Connor. Richmond was also an uncredited producer on the Elvis Presley pic “It Happened at the World’s Fair.”

In the 1950s he partnered with his close friend Tyrone Power to form Copa Prods. The company’s first movie, “Count Three and Pray,” introduced Joanne Woodward to films. In 1959, during the filming of “Solomon and Sheba,” Richmond was devastated when Power, »

- Carmel Dagan

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

18 items from 2014


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