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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

12 items from 2015


Ten Weddings and No Funerals: The Greatest Cinematic Nuptials

18 May 2015 5:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

There are few rituals in life more chaotic, confounding and magical than the wedding. Appropriately, marriages have provided the backdrop for many a story spun through the ages. Whether it’s sending out multitudes of wedding invitations, choosing the right dress, or whether to seat Aunt Mabel next to her second or fifth ex-husband at the reception, weddings both in life and on film are almost always guaranteed to bring forth a surge of emotions. Below are a few of our favorite cinematic nuptials:

1. The Searchers (1956)

John Ford’s western masterpiece is full of many iconic moments, not the least of which is one of the screen’s greatest knock-down, drag-out fights between Jeffrey Hunter and Ken Curtis for the hand of comely Vera Miles. Martin Scorsese loved this scene so much, he paid homage by having his characters watch it in Mean Streets (1973).

2. Rachel Getting Married »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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25 mainly forgotten Us number 1 movies from the 2000s

13 May 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Kevin Spacey, Steven Seagal and, erm, Kangaroo Jack: they all nabbed the box office top spot last decade...

By the end of the 2000s, getting number one at the American box office was a valuable marketing commodity. As such, studios pumped more and more money into making sure they at least had a great opening weekend for their product.

The consequence of this was that it was harder and harder for smaller and quirkier films to take a brief spot in the sun. Certainly towards the second half of the decade, it seems that the number one movie each week was pre-ordinained in a marketing meeting somewhere.

Still, there were some films that have since fallen out of public view that clawed their way to number one. How many of these do you remember?

Eye Of The Beholder

January 2000, one week

Based on Marc Behm's book of the same name, »

- simonbrew

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Time Machine: Oscar Winner-to-Be Bale with Wife on Red Carpet

9 May 2015 10:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale at the Oscars Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic on the Academy Awards' Red Carpet Eventual Best Supporting Actor winner Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale are seen above on the Red Carpet of the 83rd Academy Awards, held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The Welsh-born Bale took home the Oscar statuette for his performance as a boxer turned coach and junkie in David O. Russell's boxing drama and sleeper hit The Fighter. His co-stars were Mark Wahlberg (who also co-produced the film), Best Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo, and Best Supporting Actress nominee Amy Adams. Christian Bale movies The Fighter was Christian Bale's first Academy Award nomination. Among his other movie credits are: The Dark Knight (2008). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Christian Bale. Heath Ledger. Maggie Gyllenhaal. Aaron Eckhart. The Prestige (2006). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Hugh Jackman. »

- D. Zhea

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Why 1977 was the best year in movie history

28 April 2015 3:28 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. 1977 is the greatest year in film history. I'm positive. Why? It's the year that made you believe giant blockbusters could bring you state-of-the-art science fiction, modern (and enduring) takes on romance, compelling heroes, and a shrewd understanding of real people. It's the year that put us in touch with our most superheroic and most sentimental qualities, and that range alone is worth honoring. '77 is the year that gave us "Star Wars." I could go on about why that's a great movie, or we could just understand that every sci-fi blockbuster since "Star Wars" has had to deal with belittling comparisons to the greatness of "Star Wars." Sure, there've been other blockbusters with grandeur and special effects galore, but did they have C3PO's charisma? »

- Louis Virtel

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The Graduate Screens Friday Night at Webster University

14 April 2015 8:59 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Oh no, Mrs. Robinson. I think, I think you’re the most attractive of all my parents’ friends. I mean that!”

The Graduate  will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium Friday April 17th at 7:30pm.

The Graduate (1967), director Mike Nichols’ second feature after he debuted with Who’S Afraid Of Virginia Wolf? (1966), is still a delightful classic and a nostalgic piece of its time, to say the least. Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman, 30 years old at the time, convincingly playing someone a decade his junior) is fresh out of college, and comes back to his rich parents’ house in a California suburb. Bored and undecided about what to do with his life, Benjamin is seduced by a friend of the family, middle-aged Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft, who was actually only 36). When Mrs. Robinson’s daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross) shows up, Benjamin is forced to take her on a date. »

- Tom Stockman

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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Stop in the Name of Love: Top Ten Forbidden Romances in the Movies

13 March 2015 6:12 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Human beings and their affectionate vibes are something special. After all, we as individuals are going to love who we feel are worth loving. However, society demands that the protocol of loving should be straight-forward and “natural”. The rule of thumb: stick to your own kind! Whether it is being loyal to your own kind racially or culturally or either with your own age range the expectation of romance is defined…do not make waves and keep things safe and mainstream!

Well, human beings can be also unpredictable and live for going against the grain especially certain characters and personalities in the movies. Love and romance make for great film fodder but when the notion of such on-screen amorous activities takes its theme to a whole new challenging level then the gloves are off!

In Stop in the Name of Love: Top Ten Forbidden Romances in the Movies we will »

- Frank Ochieng

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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From Julie Andrews to Carrie Underwood, 50 Years of Solving a Problem Like Maria

6 March 2015 4:25 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

How do you solve a problem like Maria? For the producers of The Sound of Music, which hit theaters fifty years ago this week, the solution turned out to be Julie Andrews. Other actresses were considered for the part of the free-spirited nanny whose effervescence overcomes not only the grumpiness of Captain von Trapp but also the tyranny of the Nazis. Among those rumored to have been in the running for the role were Grace Kelly, Doris Day, Audrey Hepburn and Anne Bancroft. But in the end, even the producers who wanted a bigger, more marquee-friendly name agreed that Maria should be played by Andrews. »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Oscar No-Shows: 9 Winners Who Weren't There to Accept the Big Award

23 February 2015 4:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Oscars sum up Hollywood quite tidily: The most popular people get together to find out who has been selected as being especially notable, and then everyone claps. If you're the type who likes attention - and let's face it, most who excel in Hollywood do - getting that moment onstage is a dream come true. Every now and then, however, an Oscar winner isn't present to receive his or her statuette. It's Hollywood heresy - the thought that someone would have somewhere more important to be than onstage, receiving applause. But it happens, and when it does, there's usually a good story behind it. »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Can you ace HitFix's brutal 21-question Oscars quiz?

19 February 2015 4:26 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The Oscars are less than 96 hours away, so you only have a limited amount of time to brag about your insane knowledge of Academy Awards history. Ready for a brutal 21-question foray into Oscar's grisly past? Let's roll. (We give you the questions on the first page. Jot down your responses, then check the answers, along with the accompanying questions, on the next page. The videos embedded here aren't related to the questions. They're just fun!) 1. What ‘90s Best Actor winner gave the shortest onscreen performance ever nominated (and therefore awarded) in that category? This is measured by total minutes and seconds spent onscreen. 2. The first (and so far only) black female nominee in the Best Original Screenplay category was a co-writer of what biopic released in the 1970s? 3. From 1937 to 1945, the Academy guaranteed nominations in one particular category to any studio that submitted a qualifiable entry. What was the category? »

- Louis Virtel

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The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

30. Apollo 13 (1995)

Lost to: Braveheart

In 1995, director Ron Howard brought a true life story of hope in the face of peril and started sweeping up awards. He won the Directors Guild Award. He won the Producers Guild Award. He won the Screen Actors Guild Ensemble Award. He lost the Golden Globe Drama to “Sense and Sensibility,” though he was nominated. Nothing could beat “Apollo 13.” Oscar night came and the Academy decided to hand the award to Mel Gibson’s historical epic about William Wallace, whose only precursor award was a surprise directing win at the Golden Globes. I’m not saying “Apollo 13″ is a greater film than “Braveheart.” It’s just proof that even the mighty may fall if a charismatic actor/director is at the helm.

29. L.A. Confidential (1997)

Lost to: Titanic

Curtis Hanson’s neo noir wasn’t the only quality loser from 1997 (“Good Will Hunting, »

- Joshua Gaul

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

12 items from 2015


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