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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 26 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

Criterion's The Graduate, Plus Chaplin, Oshima, Troell, And More Coming In February

16 November 2015 6:00 PM, PST | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

And here's to you, Criterion Collection! The home video company just announced its February 2016 slate of releases, topped by Mike Nichols' The Graduate. Dustin Hoffman's star-making performance as recent college graduate Benjamin Braddock, who begins an affair with spiky family friend Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft) for lack of anything else to do except contemplate his future, may have marked a turning point in modern cinema, but it's also an immensely easy movie to enjoy as a comedy of manners. This edition includes a new interview with Hoffman, a new conversation between producer Lawrence Turman and screenwriter Buck Henry, and a new interview about editor Sam O'Steen. As usual, Criterion has gathered a host of interesting archival materials to go with the new 4K digital...

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Interview: Linda Gray of ‘Dallas’ on Larry Hagman & Her New Book ‘The Road to Happiness’

6 November 2015 7:19 AM, PST | | See recent news »

Chicago – In the summer of 1980, the whole nation was obsessed with one question – “Who shot J.R.?” J.R. was J.R. Ewing, portrayed by Larry Hagman, and the TV show that provided that question was “Dallas.” The role of J.R.’s long suffering wife on the show was portrayed by Linda Gray, who has written a new memoir.

Linda Ann Gray took a circuitous route to her most famous role, as chronicled in her new book “The Road to Happiness – Is Always Under Construction.” She was born in Santa Monica, California, and like many women of her generation, married at a very young age (that marriage lasted for 21 years). She sought fulfillment beyond that life, and began a modeling career in the 1960s – one of her most famous jobs was standing in for Anne Bancroft’s leg on the poster for the film, “The Graduate.”

Ms. Gray used »

- (Adam Fendelman)

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Is Doris Day Coming Out of Retirement for Clint Eastwood?

22 September 2015 1:04 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Classic movie fans were estatic when they heard director Steven Spielberg was trying to bring Gene Wilder out of retirement for an unnamed project expected to be Ready Player One. Now, another equally surprising due is rumored to be collaborating, as iconic actor and director Clint Eastwood attempts to woo Doris Day back to the big screen. Though, at this time, this news has not been confirmed by anyone directly associated with either party.

Doris Day, who is 91-years-old, retired from acting 47 years ago. The Calamity Jane star is reportedly in talks with Clint Eastwood. The two are neighbors in Carmel Valley California. It is believed that the director delivered the golden age actress a script on a recent visit. She is said to be quite delighted with the proposition.

The role that Clint Eastwood wants Doris Day to use in making her comeback has not yet been revealed. It »

- MovieWeb

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The Golden Girls' most bad-ass moments

14 September 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

"The Golden Girls," the superhero quartet of choice for people who found "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" not bad-ass enough, turns 30 years old today. The Miami-set series enjoys a huge following even today, which is no surprise when you consider that the show's four lead actresses all won Emmys for their work. To celebrate their awesomeness, let's pick the Golden Girls' best non-"Golden Girls" moments. Rue McClanahan in "Starship Troopers"   Look at Rue McClanahan owning that Blanche Devereux sauciness and absolutely terrifying Casper Van Dien and Denise Richards in "Starship Troopers." Her Karl Lagerfeld-like intensity is fantastic. Even Robert Heinlein couldn't have predicted how welcome McClanahan's presence would be in a sci-fi caper.   Estelle Getty talks feminism on "The Joan Rivers Show" Since everyone's bemoaning that Vanity Fair photo of the all-male late night hosting crew, let's take a moment to remember how kickass Joan Rivers' show was. »

- Louis Virtel

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Trends in 70's Cinema: Disaster Movies

13 September 2015 7:39 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Let’s face it, most of us have a soft spot for things blowing up in movies, and for a long time movies have been happy to feed our appetite for destruction. But it wasn’t always that way.

I know it’s hard to imagine, but there was a time when explosions weren’t so common in movies. Back then, big-budget movies had dancing and singing, and everyone had a merry time. After WWII though, things started to change. In newspapers and magazines, Americans were being exposed to terrible images of war-torn Europe and Japan. This imagery was haunting, yet it sparked some imaginations. At first, Hollywood was careful not to glamorize it. They figured out a way to show massive destruction and violence while making it fun and moderately profitable instead of soul-crushing and distasteful. The 50’s became known for its low-budget cheese-fests; sci-fi B movies featuring such »

- (G.S. Perno)

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Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? | Blu-ray Review

8 September 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Like many of Stanley Kramer’s once incredibly topical titles, the iconic Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? seems incredibly dated by today’s standards, even if the subject matter and representation of ‘interracial’ relationships and everything that antiseptic terminology implies hasn’t quite progressed as much as one would hope since this film thundered into cinemas in 1967. Sandwiched between two lesser beloved titles in his filmography, Ship of Fools (1965) and The Secret of Santa Vittoria (1969), this was Kramer’s third Oscar nod as Best Director and the last great hurrah (he’d direct a handful of other features throughout the next decade, and a 1975 television pilot version of this film).

Successful San Francisco newspaper owner Matt Drayton (Spencer Tracy) and his liberal minded wife (Katharine Hepburn) are about to have their progressive viewpoints challenged when their white daughter Christina (Katharine Houghton) brings home her fiancé of one week, a black, »

- Nicholas Bell

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A Unique Superstar: 20th Century Icon Garbo on TCM

26 August 2015 5:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Greta Garbo movie 'The Kiss.' Greta Garbo movies on TCM Greta Garbo, a rarity among silent era movie stars, is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” performer today, Aug. 26, '15. Now, why would Garbo be considered a silent era rarity? Well, certainly not because she easily made the transition to sound, remaining a major star for another decade. Think Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, William Powell, Fay Wray, Marie Dressler, Wallace Beery, John Barrymore, Warner Baxter, Janet Gaynor, Constance Bennett, etc. And so much for all the stories about actors with foreign accents being unable to maintain their Hollywood stardom following the advent of sound motion pictures. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer star, Garbo was no major exception to the supposed rule. Mexican Ramon Novarro, another MGM star, also made an easy transition to sound, and so did fellow Mexicans Lupe Velez and Dolores del Rio, in addition to the very British »

- Andre Soares

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More Than 'Star Wars' Actress Mom: Reynolds Shines Even in Mawkish 'Nun' Based on Tragic Real-Life (Ex-)Nun

23 August 2015 5:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Debbie Reynolds ca. early 1950s. Debbie Reynolds movies: Oscar nominee for 'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,' sweetness and light in phony 'The Singing Nun' Debbie Reynolds is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 23, '15. An MGM contract player from 1950 to 1959, Reynolds' movies can be seen just about every week on TCM. The only premiere on Debbie Reynolds Day is Jerry Paris' lively marital comedy How Sweet It Is (1968), costarring James Garner. This evening, TCM is showing Divorce American Style, The Catered Affair, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and The Singing Nun. 'Divorce American Style,' 'The Catered Affair' Directed by the recently deceased Bud Yorkin, Divorce American Style (1967) is notable for its cast – Reynolds, Dick Van Dyke, Jean Simmons, Jason Robards, Van Johnson, Lee Grant – and for the fact that it earned Norman Lear (screenplay) and Robert Kaufman (story) a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination. »

- Andre Soares

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Lily Tomlin and the generational feminism of her new film 'Grandma'

19 August 2015 3:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I don't keep a running list of all the people I have or haven't interviewed over the last 17 years. I think my first official Ain't It Cool interview was either with Brad Bird or maybe Neil Gaiman. Or was it Kevin Spacey? I have memories of many of the interviews I've done. Specific questions or reactions. But as many things as I remember, I'll bet I've forgotten five times more things, simply because of the sheer volume of all of the interviews I've done. There are people I know I've never spoken with, though, because if I had, those memories would not fade. And one of the people that I have always wanted to meet and talk to about their work was Lily Tomlin. I say "was" because as of last Friday, she is no longer on my "to do" list. We sat down to talk about her new film, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Neal Doesn't Stand Still as Earth Stops, Fascism Rises: Oscar Winner Who Suffered Massive Stroke Is TCM's Star

16 August 2015 4:55 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Patricia Neal ca. 1950. Patricia Neal movies: 'The Day the Earth Stood Still,' 'A Face in the Crowd' Back in 1949, few would have predicted that Gary Cooper's leading lady in King Vidor's The Fountainhead would go on to win a Best Actress Academy Award 15 years later. Patricia Neal was one of those performers – e.g., Jean Arthur, Anne Bancroft – whose film career didn't start out all that well, but who, by way of Broadway, managed to both revive and magnify their Hollywood stardom. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” series, Turner Classic Movies is dedicating Sunday, Aug. 16, '15, to Patricia Neal. This evening, TCM is showing three of her best-known films, in addition to one TCM premiere and an unusual latter-day entry. 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' Robert Wise was hardly a genre director. A former editor (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons »

- Andre Soares

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Film Review: ‘Paulette’

14 August 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A trash-talking French granny gradually warms to the world, thanks to the mellowing effects of marijuana in “Paulette.” Mind you, the bitter old spinster never smokes the stuff herself, but instead becomes the neighborhood’s unlikeliest new dealer in this French box office sensation, which finally arrives Stateside fully two years after the death of its leading lady, Bernadette Lafont. While the film is too simple-minded to take seriously, the pleasure of seeing an upstanding actress like Lafont (a New Wave fixture who made nine films with Claude Chabrol) deliver such a surprising role at the end of her career should work in any language — though the right American audience would sooner see it sans subtitles, and ideally with someone like Julie Andrews or Anne Bancroft in the role.

Following a home-movie opening-credits sequence that recalls happier days in Paulette’s life, the script immediately makes clear that the once-happy »

- Peter Debruge

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MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

10 August 2015 2:19 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than »

- Andre Soares

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Twenty Questions with Kristin West

10 July 2015 7:43 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

By Mike Thomas

Today we have the honor to speak with a very versatile performer. Fearless, she is adept in front of the camera as well as behind the scenes. She’s done shocking films, like Circus of the Dead, as well as cerebral projects like her Award-Winning Phoenix Song. We are honored to talk to Kristin West.

Thank you for taking the time to speak with us.

Mh: You have such an innocent face. How did you get connected with horror?

Kristin: Many of my opportunities have been in horror and as my mother always says, “Walk through the open door.” As to having an “innocent face,” I’ve been told that before and it always makes me chuckle. I’ve been called angel-faced, baby-faced, and cherubic—but then some find my eyes a bit sinister. I like playing with that.

Mh: What drew you to horror? »

- Mike Thomas

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Third Harry Potter Movie a Major Letdown. Is CGI Enough to Create On-Screen Magic?

6 June 2015 7:20 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban' poster. With Daniel Radcliffe. Rupert Grint. Emma Watson. 'Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban' quiz question: Does state-of-the-art CGI equal movie magic? (Oscar Movie Series) Alfonso Cuarón seems like an odd choice for director of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, the third installment in the Harry Potter movie series. That is, if one thinks only of Cuarón's pre-Harry Potter sleeper hit, the François Truffaut-esque Y tu mamá también, while ignoring two of his earlier efforts, the critically acclaimed A Little Princess and the moderately respected Great Expectations. This time around, working with a reported $130 million budget (approx. $163 million in 2015), state-of-the-art special effects, and the Harry Potter franchise, Cuarón surely could do no wrong. At the box office, that is. For although Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is stylistically superior to Chris Columbus' previous work in the series, »

- Andre Soares

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Ten Weddings and No Funerals: The Greatest Cinematic Nuptials

18 May 2015 5:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

There are few rituals in life more chaotic, confounding and magical than the wedding. Appropriately, marriages have provided the backdrop for many a story spun through the ages. Whether it’s sending out multitudes of wedding invitations, choosing the right dress, or whether to seat Aunt Mabel next to her second or fifth ex-husband at the reception, weddings both in life and on film are almost always guaranteed to bring forth a surge of emotions. Below are a few of our favorite cinematic nuptials:

1. The Searchers (1956)

John Ford’s western masterpiece is full of many iconic moments, not the least of which is one of the screen’s greatest knock-down, drag-out fights between Jeffrey Hunter and Ken Curtis for the hand of comely Vera Miles. Martin Scorsese loved this scene so much, he paid homage by having his characters watch it in Mean Streets (1973).

2. Rachel Getting Married »

- The Hollywood

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25 mainly forgotten Us number 1 movies from the 2000s

13 May 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Kevin Spacey, Steven Seagal and, erm, Kangaroo Jack: they all nabbed the box office top spot last decade...

By the end of the 2000s, getting number one at the American box office was a valuable marketing commodity. As such, studios pumped more and more money into making sure they at least had a great opening weekend for their product.

The consequence of this was that it was harder and harder for smaller and quirkier films to take a brief spot in the sun. Certainly towards the second half of the decade, it seems that the number one movie each week was pre-ordinained in a marketing meeting somewhere.

Still, there were some films that have since fallen out of public view that clawed their way to number one. How many of these do you remember?

Eye Of The Beholder

January 2000, one week

Based on Marc Behm's book of the same name, »

- simonbrew

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Time Machine: Oscar Winner-to-Be Bale with Wife on Red Carpet

9 May 2015 10:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale at the Oscars Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic on the Academy Awards' Red Carpet Eventual Best Supporting Actor winner Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale are seen above on the Red Carpet of the 83rd Academy Awards, held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The Welsh-born Bale took home the Oscar statuette for his performance as a boxer turned coach and junkie in David O. Russell's boxing drama and sleeper hit The Fighter. His co-stars were Mark Wahlberg (who also co-produced the film), Best Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo, and Best Supporting Actress nominee Amy Adams. Christian Bale movies The Fighter was Christian Bale's first Academy Award nomination. Among his other movie credits are: The Dark Knight (2008). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Christian Bale. Heath Ledger. Maggie Gyllenhaal. Aaron Eckhart. The Prestige (2006). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Hugh Jackman. »

- D. Zhea

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Why 1977 was the best year in movie history

28 April 2015 3:28 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. 1977 is the greatest year in film history. I'm positive. Why? It's the year that made you believe giant blockbusters could bring you state-of-the-art science fiction, modern (and enduring) takes on romance, compelling heroes, and a shrewd understanding of real people. It's the year that put us in touch with our most superheroic and most sentimental qualities, and that range alone is worth honoring. '77 is the year that gave us "Star Wars." I could go on about why that's a great movie, or we could just understand that every sci-fi blockbuster since "Star Wars" has had to deal with belittling comparisons to the greatness of "Star Wars." Sure, there've been other blockbusters with grandeur and special effects galore, but did they have C3PO's charisma? »

- Louis Virtel

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The Graduate Screens Friday Night at Webster University

14 April 2015 8:59 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

“Oh no, Mrs. Robinson. I think, I think you’re the most attractive of all my parents’ friends. I mean that!”

The Graduate  will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium Friday April 17th at 7:30pm.

The Graduate (1967), director Mike Nichols’ second feature after he debuted with Who’S Afraid Of Virginia Wolf? (1966), is still a delightful classic and a nostalgic piece of its time, to say the least. Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman, 30 years old at the time, convincingly playing someone a decade his junior) is fresh out of college, and comes back to his rich parents’ house in a California suburb. Bored and undecided about what to do with his life, Benjamin is seduced by a friend of the family, middle-aged Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft, who was actually only 36). When Mrs. Robinson’s daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross) shows up, Benjamin is forced to take her on a date. »

- Tom Stockman

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 26 items from 2015   « Prev | Next », Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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